Tag Archives: Pick-up

My Other Other Car’s a Fiat…

The Fiat 500 has been a runaway success across Europe. Over two million have been sold to date, despite the design remaining virtually unchanged in fourteen years of production.

Fiat, unused to building a car that people actually like, subsequently decided that literally everything they make should be a 500[something]. This has unfortunately led to hideous monstrosities like thiswhich have been about as successful as storming the U.S. Capitol building in the hope of overturning a legitimate election.

However unlike Fiat, LEGO’s ace 10271 Creator Fiat 500 set is proving not only a hit, but also one that can be used to create a range of other vehicles that don’t just look like a regular 500 has died at sea and washed up on a beach months later.

Cases in point are these two brilliant B-Models, each built only from the parts found within the 10271 Fiat 500 set, and each managing to successfully create something new and excellent from the recycled parts.

First up (above) is monstermatou‘s marvellous 1920s Citroen 5HP Trefle, which captures the real car so well you’d be hard pushed to know it’s an alternate (which explains why monstermatou very nearly won TLCB Lock-Down B-Model Competition with one of his past builds). Building instructions are available and there’s more to see on Flickr via the link above.

Today’s second 10271 alternate comes from a past official LEGO set designer no less, the incredibly talented Nathanael Kuipers, who has turned the little classic Fiat into a 1950s pick-up truck.

Cleverly using the Fiat’s interior pieces to make up for the shortfall in available bodywork bricks, Nathanael’s B-Model includes opening doors, hood and tailgate, and building instructions are available too.

Click the link above to check out more of Nathanael’s B-Model at his photostream, and if you own a 10271 Creator Fiat 500 set, perhaps see what you can create from it! You’ll easily do a better job than Fiat have managed with the real thing…

Dodgy Restomod

Despite the title this is not a badly-restored classic, ‘repaired’ in Billy-Bob’s garage in the hope of making a quick buck. No, restomods, when done well, are rather excellent, bringing modern tech (cooling systems, brakes, suspension etc.) to cars from a very different era of performance. Flickr’s Brick Flag has turned his very capable hand to restomoding his own ’60s Dodge A100 model, in the final of his five ‘forward-control’ classic vans. There’s more to see of Brick’s excellent creation on Flickr via the link above, and you can see all five brilliant classic vans side-by-side by clicking here.

Little Red Wagon | Picture Special

It’s 1965, and drag-racers Jim Schaeffer and John Collier have got their hands on a Dodge A100 ‘forward-control’ truck. The pair decided to install a 426 Hemi in the bed, and any non-essential items were removed. The resulting ‘Little Red Wagon’ was the world’s fastest 1/4 mile truck, setting an eleven second time at the first attempt. However, the modifications also tilted the weight bias rearward a bit…

The unintended consequences of this rear-biased weight distribution were a vehicle that proffered to drive only on its back wheels, and in fact the ‘Little Red Wagon’ could complete an entire 1/4 mile race without the front wheels ever touching the ground.

Such crowd-pleasing shenanigans caught the attention of Dodge, who not only used the ‘Little Red Wagon’ in commercials, they all arranged for its purchase by Super Stock Champion Bill Golden to use as the first ‘competition wheelstander’, a class it created single handedly.

Of course having your front wheels in the air limited steering somewhat, and the ‘Little Red Wagon’ crashed in 1969. And 1971. And 1975. That last wreck took the truck out of service, and Golden converted a new truck to continue his wheel standing antics, setting the Guinness World Record for the longest (at nearly 3/4 of a mile!) in 1977 and racing it until his retirement in 2003.

Today a recreation of the ‘Little Red Wagon’ tours alongside the wrecked original, whilst Golden’s own replacement wheel standing truck sold for over $500,000 in 2009.

Flickr’s Brick Flag, who is fast becoming one of our favourite builders here at TLCB, has converted his own Dodge A100 model into a ‘Little Red Wagon’ wheelstander, with his spectacular Model Team version amalgamating the different versions of the real truck that were built over the years.

Superb design, detailing, and decals are evident in abundance and there’s heaps more to see at Brick’s ’60s Dodge Little Red Wagon’ album on Flickr. Click the link above to head down the drag strip on just your back wheels, and here to see the real ‘Little Red Wagon’ in action courtesy of a glorious period video!

Orange Juice

Flickr’s Brick Flag has appeared here twice recently, with his excellent American 1960s ‘forward control’ vans, the Dodge A100 and Ford Econoline. We tend not to feature the same builder repeatedly in quick succession, but had we not today there would have been an Elven riot. Plus, – more importantly – we think this is bloody cool too.

The reason for the Elves’ excitement is obvious; Brick Flag‘s latest build is bright orange, features a racing stripe, wheelie-bar, ground-scraping stance, a huge rear wing, oh – and it has ‘some sort of turbo jet boat engine directly on its rear axle’, to quote the builder. This has also allowed for a bench seat to be fitted in place of the original two-seat set-up, which sounds safe.

Even Brick Flag admits this ‘makes no sense whatsoever’, but if you’re a TLCB Elf few things do, and that’s the way they like it. There’s more to see of Brick’s wildly modded ‘Pro Street’ ’60s Ford Econoline at his photostream – click the link above to fire up ‘some sort of turbo jet boat engine’ and become an orange blur.

Bone Crusher*

Inspired by a Hot Wheels toy, and named after an obese rapper or one of the giants in the BFG, this is Tim Inman‘s ‘Bone Crusher’; a V8-powered hot rod pick-up with a giant skull on the front. And on the rear deck. And with bones for seats. The Elves, predictably, think it’s the greatest vehicle of all time, and you can see more of Tim’s creation on Flickr via the link.

*Today’s title song. ‘Cause we’re street.

Econoline

From one simple, basic workhorse to another now, and possibly the most blandly-named vehicle in American history, the Ford Econoline.

Worried by Volkswagen’s assault on the budget van and pick-up market with the Type 2 Transporter, America’s domestic auto-makers began to build their own ‘forward-control’ pick-ups in the 1960s.

Ford based their design on the Falcon sedan which helped to keep costs low, as did leaf-spring suspension both front and rear, and a manual gearbox with just three speeds.

The Econoline did feature a racing stripe down the side though, and today we think it looks rather good, particularly as the Econoline had become a standard and far less interesting two-box van by the 1970s.

This superb Model Team recreation of the 1960s original comes from Brick Flag of Flickr, who has captured the 1961 Econoline pick-up wonderfully, including an excellent brick-built version of the ‘FORD’ stamped tailgate.

There’s more to see of Brick Flag’s model at his photostream – click the link above jump back to ’61.

Little Red Wagon

It’s a busy day here at TLCB, with several Elves vying for a meal token. The first lucky recipient returned to TLCB Towers with this, Tim Henderson‘s ‘Little Red Wagon’ mid-engined wheel-standing dragster. There’s not much room for stuff in the bed, and even if there was it would probably tip out anyway, but who cares when you can wheelie on the way to work. Head to Flickr via the link above for more!

My Other Bird is a Horse

Nothing says ‘America’ like voter fraud apparently*. A close second however, is the Ford F-150 pick-up, especially in Raptor specification and with stars-and-stripes FORD lettering across the front.

This fantastic recreation of America’s favourite uprated off-road pick-up comes from Master MOCer and vehicle-building legend Firas Abu-Jaber, who has created it entirely from the parts found within the official 10265 Ford Mustang set.

Despite the limitations of its parts-base, Firas’ F-150 Raptor not only looks superb, it features working steering, opening doors, a functioning sunroof, a dropping tailgate, and a detailed engine underneath the opening hood.

There’s much more to see of Firas’ 10265 B-Model at his ‘Ford F150 Raptor’ album on Flickr, where around twenty stunning images are available to view.

You can also find building instructions for the Raptor available at Firas’ excellent new website Bricks Garage, where instructions for over a dozen of Firas’ builds are available for download, including a range of set alternates. Find out more here!

*Yes we are taking the piss.

Pick-Up Electric

America really likes pick-up trucks. The best selling vehicles in the U.S. are the Ford F-150, Chevrolet Silverado, and Dodge Ram, followed by a pair of SUVs (the Toyota RAV4 and Honda CR-V respectively). In fact only two vehicles in the top eight are cars. Tump is (rightly) called out on his total disregard for CO2 emissions legislation, but it’s not like he’s going against the wishes of the American people, who – based on their vehicular choices – must all be lumberjacks during the week and tow boats at the weekend.

Of course the electric revolution will reach pick-up trucks one day, and until then Ford at least have taken a small step in the right direction by replacing most of their old V8s with smaller, marginally less environmentally catastrophic, turbocharged units.

Back to electricity though, and pick-ups are perfect for electrification, having loads of chassis space for batteries, and supposedly often doing tasks that would benefit from electric motor torque, like lumberjacking and towing boats…

The electrification of Lego pick-ups is the opposite however, seeing as there is no covered body to hide the battery box, and both it and the motors have to be squeezed inside a cabin full of cabiny things. That hasn’t stopped mktechniccreations though, who has built this superbly accurate Model Team/Creator Ford F-150 that would be bloggable on looks alone, and yet – by witchcraft and magic – has equipped his model with a perfectly-concealed full remote control drive system with Power Functions motors and a BuWizz bluetooth battery.

It’s quite a feat of engineering and if you’d like to have a go yourself MK has released building instructions so you can learn how he’s done it! There’s more to see of this remarkably packaged Ford F-150 at both MK’s Bricksafe gallery and at the Eurobricks forum, where you can see images showing how the motors are fitted and find a link to building instructions – take a look via links!

Hey Joe*

Joe (aka Tormund Giantsbane from Game of Thrones) has got himself a nice tow truck. Built by TLCB regular Andrea Lattanzio it’s also got some very nice parts usage going on. See if you can spot the swords, pirates’ hooks, meat cleavers, ice skates, and binoculars all cunningly deployed to different uses throughout the build. See more of ‘Joe’s Tow Truck’ at Andrea’s photostream via the link above.

*Today’s excellent title song

What’s the Matter? Chicken!

There’s clearly one vehicle that’s the most famous from the ‘Back to the Future’ movie franchise, even though it was actually a fairly poor car and one mired in one of the greatest auto industry scandals of all time.

Far less famous, but a far better car, was Marty McFly’s Toyota Pick-Up (that’s all they called it) SR5 in ‘Back to the Future – Part III’, which Eurobricks’ RM8 has recreated brilliantly in Technic form using his previously blogged Toyota Hilux as a base.

An XL motor powers all four wheels whilst a Servo controls the steering, with a third-party SBrick allowing the model to be controlled remotely via bluetooth. Solid axle suspension features front and rear, as do opening doors, hood and tailgate, working LED headlights, plus the model features a removable body and cargo bed.

There’s more to see of RM8’s superb SR5 at the Eurobricks forum by clicking here, and the obligator title reface can be found by clicking these words!

Stick a V8 in it

Ask the internet any car-related question and when the answer’s not ‘Miata’, it’s ‘Stick a V8 in it’. More specifically an LS. It seems that’s what builder Zux has done in creating his entry for the current Eurobricks Small Car Contest. Literally.

Before we get onto the engine, Zux’s Technic pick-up truck features some decent functionality, including working suspension front and rear, opening doors, hood and tailgate, and working steering.

Now that engine… It’s not a load that the pick-up is carrying in the second and third images you can see here, rather it is the pick-up’s engine, driven by the rear wheels and making the pick-up’s pick-up-ness completely pointless.

As such Zux has photographed his creation with and without its ridiculous cargo/power-plant, but you can guess which version the Elves preferred….

There’s more to see of Zux’s build on both Flickr and in the Eurobricks forum; ‘stick a V8 in it’ via the links!

More Kicks on Route 66

Dornbi’s ace vehicular Americana appeared here earlier in the month, and he’s now published the complete diorama in which his classic metal features. A collaboration with another builder, Dornbi’s brilliant ’40s and ’50s vehicles pass a charming rural desert gas station, complete with pumps, workshop and store, driving of course on the superb brick-built Route 66 itself. There’s more to see of this wonderful build on Flickr – click here to drive Route 66 for yourself!

Get your Kicks on Route 66*

It’s a bumper haul for an Elf today, with no less than five creations brought back to TLCB Towers. All come from Dornbi, who has – from left to right – created a Ford ’40 Coupe, Mercury Eight, Hudson Hornet, Ford F-100, and Mercury Eight convertible brilliantly in mini-figure(ish) scale. The collection forms part of Dornbi’s ‘Route 66’ diorama and there’s more to see of it and the cars shown here via the link to Flickr above.

*Today’s absolutely marvellous title song.

B-Model Building

You’re stuck inside, we’re stuck inside, build us a B-Model to win an awesome prize! Two more TLCB readers have done just that, building alternates from the Technic 42098 Car Transporter and Creator 10242 Mini Cooper respectively. First up (above) is cleansupgood‘s pick-up truck, shown here in digital form but also built for real. Opening doors, a dropping tailgate, a working V8 engine and functioning steering all feature and you can see more of Clean’s 42098 B-Model via Bricksafe at the link above.

This post’s second entry comes from newcomer Jan Geurts, who has repurposed the Creator 10242 Mini Cooper set to build another British classic, the MG Midget. Jan’s 10242 B-Model includes opening doors, an opening hood (with a detailed engine underneath), and an opening trunk complete with an external luggage rack. There’s more to see on Flickr via the link above, and if you’d like to enter your own B-Model into TLCB Lock-Down Competition you can read the contest details here.