Tag Archives: Pick-up

Fantastic Ford

The Lego Car Blog Elves are having a great day today. Previous bloggee Jakub Marcisz is back with this lovely Classic Ford F100 pick-up, which not only looks fantastic, there’s a complete Power Functions remote control drivetrain underneath too.

The Elves therefore, are riding around in the back. A few have inevitably been run over, but for the most part it’s good clean fun.

Jakub’s model conceals its remote controlness well, with the only clue visible being if the brown box is removed from the bed, and the model also features opening doors (revealing a beautifully constructed interior), dropping tailgate, opening hood, LED lights, working suspension, and a high/low gearbox.

It’s a top quality build that’s worth a closer look, and you can do just that via Jakub’s photostream at the link above, where more imagery and a link to a YouTube video can also be found.

404 Error: File Found

Ah Error 404. The Hypertext Transfer Protocol standard response code that indicates the browser communicated with a given server, but the server couldn’t find what was requested.

Which, as purveyors of a website with a million views a year, we of course knew without looking it up on Google… Honestly, it’s a miracle that this site functions at all.

Anyway, today 404 was found, as one of Elves brought back this rather lovely Peugeot 404 pick-up, as built by regular bloggee Jonathan Elliott.

Based on Peugeot’s 1960s large passenger car, the 404 pick-up was produced into the late ’80s in Europe, and until 1991 in Kenya, where it’s still a common sight thanks to its almost unbreakable toughness. Yup, we really did say that about a Peugeot.

Jonathan’s 8-wide recreation captures the 404 pick-up beautifully, and you can check out the build, along with his extensive garage of other Speed Champions scale vehicles, at his photostream on Flickr.

Click the link above to instruct your browser to communicate with the server. Or something.

LEGO Technic 42126 Ford F-150 Raptor | Set Preview

The Ford F-150 Raptor is the Mustang of off-roaders. By which we mean it’s a vehicle usually seen doing stuff like this. Or this. Or this. But enough gratuitous footage of Raptor driver incompetence, because now you can crash your very own Ford F-150 Raptor at home!

Yup, LEGO have added the be-stickered off-road ready version of America’s best-selling vehicle to the Technic line-up, and it looks absolutely fantastic!

Constructed from 1,379 pieces (many of which are in Porsche 911 GT3 RS orange), the new LEGO Technic 42126 Ford F-150 Raptor set faithfully recreates the crashiest of pick-ups in Technic form, with working suspension, a V6 engine, all-wheel drive, opening doors and hood, and functioning steering.

Continuing the trend for increased visual realism of Technic sets, 42126 includes a few System parts, a wealth of stickers (much like the full-size Raptor), delightfully knobbly tyres, and even the ‘HOG’ steering device is removable, so as not to affect the set’s aesthetics when it’s parked on a shelf.

Not that it should be parked on a shelf. It is a Raptor after all

The new LEGO Technic 42126 Ford F-150 Raptor set is expected to cost around $100 when it reaches stores later this year, and is – for reasons of which we’re little unclear – aimed at ages 18+. Perhaps it’s because LEGO know it’s going to spend much of its time doing things like this

Yel-Low

Today’s find is yellow and a hot rod, which – if you’re a TLCB Elf at least – is about as good as it gets. Regular bloggee 1saac W. owns the hands behind it and there’s more to see of his Chevrolet pick-up ‘show rod ‘at his photostream via the link.

My Other Car’s a Lamborghini

No really, it is.

This searingly green Technic Ford F150 is the work of TLCB Master MOCer Nico71, and it’s constructed only from the parts found within the LEGO 42115 Lamborghini Sian FKP 37 set.

Nico’s 42115 B-Model features four-wheel-drive, a V8 engine, an 8-speed sequential gearbox, adjustable suspension, and working steering, and best of all there are building instructions available so you can convert your own Lamborghini Sian set into a Ford F150 yourself.

There’s more to see at Nico71’s Brickshelf page by clicking here, you can watch a video of the alternate in action here, and you can check out how LEGO recently supersized the Lamborghini Sian set on which this creation is derived by clicking here.

Super Size Me

The Ford F150 is as American as a clown-based burger joint. However, unlike Ronald McDonald’s finest slices of cow*, it’s so enormous it isn’t available in TLCB’s home nation. It just wouldn’t fit.

Of course America can go one size larger than even the F150, or rather, a few hundred sizes…

This is the Ford F550, which by TLCB maths is 267% bigger than the already massive F150 pick-up. This is so it can tow boats, camper-trailers, and four-wheelers, although we suspect most F550s are used to drive to, well… a McDonalds, with absolutely nothing in the back beyond a ‘Keep America Great!’ bumper sticker.

The Technic recreation of the super-sized F150 you can see here is rather smaller than the real deal, but it’s still packed with functions. These include a working V8 engine, steering by both ‘Hand of God’ and the steering wheel, plus opening doors, hood and tailgate.

Flickr’s LoMaC is the builder, there are building instructions available, and lots more to see at LoMaC’s ‘Ford F550 Heavy Duty’ album. Click the link above to go super size.

*Even our regular Big Macs are much smaller than the American versions. That’s why fat kids buy two.

Get Your Bricks on Route 66

This wonderful vintage Route 66 scene was found by one of our Elves on Flickr, and it comes from the collaborative efforts of previous bloggee Dornbi and TLCB debutant Bricking Robo.

A gloriously evocative vignette, Dornbi and Robbo‘s build features a wealth of classic American metal, plus a brilliant motel, gas station, and auto shop, and there’s lots more to see at both builders’ photo streams via the links above.

Ditch Witch

From a science fictiony machine about which we know absolutely nothing to real world machine about which we know absolutely nothing. Yay!

This is a Witch Ditch JT520 and we genuinely have no idea at all what it’s for. Luckily the trailer it’s on is being pulled by a Ford F-150 crew cab pick-up, so blogging points are redeemed!

The Ford F-150, twin-axle trailer, and the aforementioned mystery contraption are all the work of Damian Z (aka Theitmaier), each is wonderfully detailed, and there’s more to see of all three models on Flickr. Click the link above to take a look.

[Hoonitruck]

Ken Block’s wild twin-turbo ‘Hoonitruck’ has appeared on these pages before, but today we bring you a rather smaller recreation of the Gymkhana icon. This one is the work of ianying616, who has captured the aesthetic of the drift-happy movie star brilliantly in Model Team form.  There’s a detailed interior, full roll cage, a realistic* engine, plus opening doors and hood, and there’s more to see of ianying’s build at his photostream via the link.

*Although not the right engine. V8’s are over.

Green Mean Machine

Being green is very fashionable these days, so here at TLCB we’re jumping on the green bandwagon with a V8-powered hot rod.

Built by TLCB regular SP_LINEUP, this ’41 Dodge hot rod pick-up is based on a real vehicle, in fact being constructed for the builder behind the full size version

There’s more of the model to see at SP’s photostream along with a host of other superb Speed Champions creations – click the link above to go green.

My Other Other Car’s a Fiat…

The Fiat 500 has been a runaway success across Europe. Over two million have been sold to date, despite the design remaining virtually unchanged in fourteen years of production.

Fiat, unused to building a car that people actually like, subsequently decided that literally everything they make should be a 500[something]. This has unfortunately led to hideous monstrosities like thiswhich have been about as successful as storming the U.S. Capitol building in the hope of overturning a legitimate election.

However unlike Fiat, LEGO’s ace 10271 Creator Fiat 500 set is proving not only a hit, but also one that can be used to create a range of other vehicles that don’t just look like a regular 500 has died at sea and washed up on a beach months later.

Cases in point are these two brilliant B-Models, each built only from the parts found within the 10271 Fiat 500 set, and each managing to successfully create something new and excellent from the recycled parts.

First up (above) is monstermatou‘s marvellous 1920s Citroen 5HP Trefle, which captures the real car so well you’d be hard pushed to know it’s an alternate (which explains why monstermatou very nearly won TLCB Lock-Down B-Model Competition with one of his past builds). Building instructions are available and there’s more to see on Flickr via the link above.

Today’s second 10271 alternate comes from a past official LEGO set designer no less, the incredibly talented Nathanael Kuipers, who has turned the little classic Fiat into a 1950s pick-up truck.

Cleverly using the Fiat’s interior pieces to make up for the shortfall in available bodywork bricks, Nathanael’s B-Model includes opening doors, hood and tailgate, and building instructions are available too.

Click the link above to check out more of Nathanael’s B-Model at his photostream, and if you own a 10271 Creator Fiat 500 set, perhaps see what you can create from it! You’ll easily do a better job than Fiat have managed with the real thing…

Dodgy Restomod

Despite the title this is not a badly-restored classic, ‘repaired’ in Billy-Bob’s garage in the hope of making a quick buck. No, restomods, when done well, are rather excellent, bringing modern tech (cooling systems, brakes, suspension etc.) to cars from a very different era of performance. Flickr’s Brick Flag has turned his very capable hand to restomoding his own ’60s Dodge A100 model, in the final of his five ‘forward-control’ classic vans. There’s more to see of Brick’s excellent creation on Flickr via the link above, and you can see all five brilliant classic vans side-by-side by clicking here.

Little Red Wagon | Picture Special

It’s 1965, and drag-racers Jim Schaeffer and John Collier have got their hands on a Dodge A100 ‘forward-control’ truck. The pair decided to install a 426 Hemi in the bed, and any non-essential items were removed. The resulting ‘Little Red Wagon’ was the world’s fastest 1/4 mile truck, setting an eleven second time at the first attempt. However, the modifications also tilted the weight bias rearward a bit…

The unintended consequences of this rear-biased weight distribution were a vehicle that proffered to drive only on its back wheels, and in fact the ‘Little Red Wagon’ could complete an entire 1/4 mile race without the front wheels ever touching the ground.

Such crowd-pleasing shenanigans caught the attention of Dodge, who not only used the ‘Little Red Wagon’ in commercials, they all arranged for its purchase by Super Stock Champion Bill Golden to use as the first ‘competition wheelstander’, a class it created single handedly.

Of course having your front wheels in the air limited steering somewhat, and the ‘Little Red Wagon’ crashed in 1969. And 1971. And 1975. That last wreck took the truck out of service, and Golden converted a new truck to continue his wheel standing antics, setting the Guinness World Record for the longest (at nearly 3/4 of a mile!) in 1977 and racing it until his retirement in 2003.

Today a recreation of the ‘Little Red Wagon’ tours alongside the wrecked original, whilst Golden’s own replacement wheel standing truck sold for over $500,000 in 2009.

Flickr’s Brick Flag, who is fast becoming one of our favourite builders here at TLCB, has converted his own Dodge A100 model into a ‘Little Red Wagon’ wheelstander, with his spectacular Model Team version amalgamating the different versions of the real truck that were built over the years.

Superb design, detailing, and decals are evident in abundance and there’s heaps more to see at Brick’s ’60s Dodge Little Red Wagon’ album on Flickr. Click the link above to head down the drag strip on just your back wheels, and here to see the real ‘Little Red Wagon’ in action courtesy of a glorious period video!

Orange Juice

Flickr’s Brick Flag has appeared here twice recently, with his excellent American 1960s ‘forward control’ vans, the Dodge A100 and Ford Econoline. We tend not to feature the same builder repeatedly in quick succession, but had we not today there would have been an Elven riot. Plus, – more importantly – we think this is bloody cool too.

The reason for the Elves’ excitement is obvious; Brick Flag‘s latest build is bright orange, features a racing stripe, wheelie-bar, ground-scraping stance, a huge rear wing, oh – and it has ‘some sort of turbo jet boat engine directly on its rear axle’, to quote the builder. This has also allowed for a bench seat to be fitted in place of the original two-seat set-up, which sounds safe.

Even Brick Flag admits this ‘makes no sense whatsoever’, but if you’re a TLCB Elf few things do, and that’s the way they like it. There’s more to see of Brick’s wildly modded ‘Pro Street’ ’60s Ford Econoline at his photostream – click the link above to fire up ‘some sort of turbo jet boat engine’ and become an orange blur.

Bone Crusher*

Inspired by a Hot Wheels toy, and named after an obese rapper or one of the giants in the BFG, this is Tim Inman‘s ‘Bone Crusher’; a V8-powered hot rod pick-up with a giant skull on the front. And on the rear deck. And with bones for seats. The Elves, predictably, think it’s the greatest vehicle of all time, and you can see more of Tim’s creation on Flickr via the link.

*Today’s title song. ‘Cause we’re street.