Tag Archives: 4-wide

Little Tow

You don’t need a billion bricks and a personal connection to the staff here at The Lego Car Blog to see you creation appear on this site. A few well-chosen bricks and excellent presentation are all you need. That and a TLCB Elf to wander onto your page, but they’re normally pretty good at finding models, otherwise they don’t get fed.

We have two small-scale examples to prove the case today, the first being this lovely Town-scale tow truck from previous bloggee de-marco. Great photography and a neat brick-built tow hitch count in its favour and there’s more to see of this and de-marco’s other builds on Flickr at the link.

Today’s second slice of simple building comes from fellow past bloggee Pixeljunkie with his gorgeous Datsun 2000 Roadster. More brilliant presentation is in evidence (and if you’re not sure how to take photos like these take a look here) with the model enhanced by some wonderful period-correct stickers. Head to Pixel’s photostream via the link above to see more of his top-notch build.

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Town Triple

It’s blue Smarties all round today as three Elves returned to TLCB Towers, each with a blue town-scale creation. It turns out all three are the work of the same builder, Flick’s de-marco, who is becoming a regular on these pages. Each has been constructed in LEGO’s classic ‘Town’ style (a favourite here at TLCB) and recreates a well known(?) real-world vehicle in mini-figure scale.

The first of de-marco’s build is perhaps the most true-to-life, a classic Dacia 1300 from a time when the Romanian brand was independent from Renault, but also simply built discontinued Renault products (and fairy badly at that…). It turns out that the Dacia 1300’s ugly blocky sloping shape is perfect for recreation from angular LEGO bricks and the result looks remarkably close to the real thing.

de-marco’s second Town vehicle is a classic Austin/Morris Mini in British police ‘panda car’ specification. LEGO’s ‘Maersk’ blue with white doors and a single blue light (using a piece from LEGO’s 9V lighting sets) works a treat, even if the car looks a little long for the famously small classic car.

Lastly de-marco has built something a little larger, in the form of this excellent Kamaz drop-side truck. As with all three creations the details are spot on, yet simple enough to fit into a Town scale build, and there’s more to see at de-marco’s photostream via the link. There are also video instructions available for each build – you can find a link to these under each image in de-marco’s photostream should you wish to jazz your own Town up with some iconic classics!

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Your Own UAZ

We’re not quite sure why anyone would want a communist crap-box like a UAZ truck, but nevertheless this mini-figure scale model of one by Flickr’s de-marco is rather a lovely thing, and he’s made video building instructions available too so that you can build your own. Click the link to make the jump.

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Mini-Fig-Vee-Dub

Volkswagen campers have long been a favourite vehicle to recreate in LEGO form. From the official 10220 set to life-size brick-built replicas, via TV stars, Technic, workshops and tenuous links to the worst music video ever made, the VW Transporter has appeared here in almost every shape, size and theme.

Today we can add a mini-figure camper to that impressive roster thanks to previous bloggee de-marco and this lovely 4-wide iteration of the classic van. Complete with a front mounted spare, surfer-dude mini-figure and the pre-requisite roof-mounted surf board there’s more to see of de-marco’s Volkswagen camper on Flickr, where there’s even a link to video instructions.

Take a look via the final link in the text above, plus you can click the other links that preceded it to read our past inane gibberish on the subjects of air-cooled Volkswagens, vloggers, and terrible ’80s synth-pop.

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Got Milk?

Lego Milk Float

Slow, quiet, and arriving in the dead of night, the humble electric milk float would be a spooky vehicle if it weren’t for the fact that it’s, well… a milk float.

Now sadly mostly replaced by boring (and not quiet at all) diesel vans, surely the time is right for the electric milk float to make a comeback. Stick a Tesla badge on it and the internet would love it at any rate.

This glorious homage to the silent dairy delivery knights comes from Flickr’s de-marco and there’s more to see of his brilliant milk float (and instructions too) at his photostream. Click the link above to bring the bottles in.

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Neat Niva

Lego Lada Niva

Lada have come in for some stick here at The Lego Car Blog. Now owned by the Renault-Nissan alliance they’ll be making good cars soon enough, but their legacy is one of reheating the leftovers from Fiat, badly. Apart that is, from one car…

The Niva was not built from bits of old Fiat, but was actually rather sophisticated. Launched in 1977 it was the world’s first mass-produced unibody car, featured independent suspension, and with permanent four-wheel-drive and locking differentials it was as good as a Land Rover off-road.

So good that the design is still being produced today, almost completely unchanged in over 40 years. Despite this it’s a car that doesn’t appear much in Lego form, so de-marco‘s brilliant 4-wide version of the iconic 4×4 makes a refreshing change from the usual Land Rovers and Jeeps. de-marco has captured the design superbly in mini-figure scale and there’s more to see of his little Lada on Flickr via the link above.

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Old Grey

Lego Vintage Truck

The vintage truck vibe continues here at TLCB with this, another wonderful build by the prolific de-marco of Flickr. Creating some of the finest Town scale vehicles around, de-marco has a huge back-catelgue of creations, many of which include free instructions so you can build them for yourself. There’s more to see of this one and de-marco’s past models at his photostream – click the link above to check them out.

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Organised Little Guys

Lego Town Garage

Hello TLCB Readers. The Elves have a riot or some kind of uprising/coup thing going on which requires proper supervision so I was invited to Guest Blog, impartially, and without condoning the Elves’ behavior. (Go, little guys!)

Organized Little Guys is the theme for this post as well. I wanted to share some work from Flickr friend and four-wide master kitt/jip. We’re invited to hang out in Kitt’s vision of a car-wrencher’s temple. The shop is immaculate, clean and well equipped, with good lighting for working on the cars well into sultry evenings. The many layers and vignettes throughout this build touch on the heart of what makes car culture so rich; it’s the connection and stories of the people who build, wrench, and share their experiences around their cars.

Lego Garage Workshop

The guys in red are also clearly very safety conscious, in full protective gear at the board table or in the lunch room…. I don’t really know, but this is probably what TLCB Elves look like (though I’ve also been explicitly asked not to speculate about that… honestly I think they’ll all basically little Stigs). Enjoy, Prototyp.

Lego Town Garage

Thanks to Prototyp for joining us as Guest Blogger here at The Lego Car Blog today, whilst we have our hands full…

There’s much more of kitt/jip’s brilliant Town-scale garage to see at his Flickr album via the link above, and you can check out Prototyp’s own creations by clicking here.

Lego Garage Workshop

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Tiny Tatra

Lego Tatra Fire Truck

You don’t need ten thousand bricks to appear here at The Lego Car Blog. Around sixty will do. At least that’s all Flickr’s František Hajdekr needed to build this lovely Tatra fire truck. See more via the link above.

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Built to Burn Rubber

Lego Ken Block Hoonicorn Mustang

We were busy getting drunk with your Mom at the weekend, but luckily for us one of our readers (and a previous bloggee here at TLCB) has stepped in to prove you don’t need a million bricks and an unlimited bank account to build something blog-worthy. Over to Nils O

4-wide cars, officially named ‘Tiny Turbos’, are like the Hot Wheels or Matchbox cars for Lego fans. I am a big fan of these tiny models and I’m always looking for new ones. Lots of them don’t really look like the original model, but every now and then comes a new model you can recognise at the first look. In this case it’s Ken Block’s heavily modified, 4-wheel driven 1965 Ford Mustang called “Hoonicorn”. The car is the star vehicle in Block’s Gymkhana 7 video and is mainly built to burn rubber. Flickr’s DerLuckyy is the builder of this ‘Tiny Turbo’ and the small thing really looks like the original, including custom-made stickers, big wheel houses and a huge diffusor. You can find these and some more pictures of the model on Flickr.

And for me the best thing about 4-wide cars is:
You only need a few bricks and a few good pictures to build your own version of the LEGO model… Vroom – Vroom!!!

Thanks to Nils for joining us today, and he’s absolutely right; a few well-chosen bricks and some good photography is all that’s needed to make a splash in the Lego Community. If you’re an observer here at TLCB and yet to try building for yourself, give it a go!

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Bricking Beige

Lego Hot Rod

Beige. The least sexy of all the colours. Not here though, were Flickr’s _Tyler has used the depressingly bland hue to brilliant effect. There’s more to see of his beige hot rod at his photostream – click the link above to make the jump.

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Johnni D Goode

jd-01

Dutch builder Johnni D’s Photostream is home to some great, small Lego cars. Recently it’s been filling up with comic style, 4-wide hot rods of all sorts of shapes. There are over 120 at the time of writing. They range from rat-rods (above) to custom Transit vans (below), via hatchbacks, campers and pick-ups. It’s well worth clicking this link to enjoy the variety of these builds.

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Micro Crane

g-crane

We love a good crane here at The Lego Car Blog. After supercars, cranes are one of the types of model that we seem to blog the most. Be they teeny tiny or monstrous, cranes are a favourite topic. Today’s crane comes from TLCB regular Galaktek. Many of the working features that you’d expect to see in a big Technic MOC have been included in this elegant 4-wide model. It also comes with its own back-up truck, which you can see in Galaktek’s Photostream.

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Tiny Lego Wonders – Book Review

Tiny Lego Wonders Review

‘Where can I get instructions / How do I build it?’. It’s the single most frequently asked question that we receive here at TLCB – so just how do you start ‘MOCing’?

It’s a question we raised in our review of the superb No Starch Press produced ‘Art of Lego Scale Modeling‘ book last year, and one that, since LEGO discontinued their brilliant Ideas Books, has gone unanswered. Now though, No Starch Press have created a book aimed squarely at fulfilling this need.

Tiny Lego Wonders, written by LEGO-Ambassador Mattia Zamboni, features 200 pages of clear instructions for 40 wonderfully realistic miniature vehicles, from cars to buses via trains, aircraft, construction equipment and more. The book is divided into sections that categorise these models according to where you might find them in the real world, for example the airport, the harbour, and the construction site.

Each location section features a double-page spread showing all of the vehicles within it in a large brick-built scene. It’s a simple yet brilliant addition that’s very reminiscent of LEGO’s old annual catalogues and it’s sure to provide a huge amount of inspiration.

Lego Instructions Book

Every set of instructions starts with a high quality image of the finished model, just as any official LEGO set does, along with a parts list and a difficulty level. The instructions themselves are beautifully clear and the build process will be familiar to anyone who has constructed an official LEGO set.

There are perhaps slightly fewer steps and marginally more complicated sub-assemblies than you’ll find in LEGO’s own work, but if anything LEGO have over-simplified their instructions in recent times and Tiny Lego Wonders seems to have struck a good balance between conciseness and difficulty.

Lego TGV Train Instructions

Where Tiny Lego Wonders scores huge points is with its inspiration potential. All of the models featured use common non-specialist parts, but even so it’s unlikely that most builders will have the exact part and colour combinations to recreate the model piece-for-piece as per the instructions. However the instructions are so good, and the models so thoughtfully designed, that changing the colours or design slightly is really easy. And once you’ve done that, you’ve started MOCing!

Some sections also include images of additional variations of the model detailed in the instructions, showing what can be done with a few simple changes. Again, these are really easy to replicate (even though they aren’t included in the instructions) and having a go yourself will instantly turn you into a ‘MOCer’.

Lego Car Instructions

Are there any disappointments? Nope, not really. Perhaps a few of the large double-page scenes look a little over-polished / too digitalised to these eyes, but other than that Tiny Lego Wonders might be the perfect MOCer’s book. Which gives us a bit of a dilemma in giving a rating because, despite the general ineptitude in TLCB office, there are some talented builders here who would have limited use for such a book. However, Tiny Lego Wonders isn’t aimed at the microscopic demographic of ‘Lego Blogger’, and thus we can ignore our usage and rate it accordingly;

Tiny Lego Wonders

Buy this book! Even at just £13 / $17 for the hardcover on Amazon, Tiny Lego Wonders is as beautifully produced as all No Starch Press publications, but for it to remain pristine on a bookshelf or coffee table would be a great shame. Tiny Lego Wonders needs to look dog-eared, shabby and worn out, because the value of this book is in its use; Tiny Lego Wonders could be the launchpad you need to start your MOCing journey.

From now on when anyone asks us ‘How do I build it?’ we’re going to give the same answer; You start here.

✮✮✮✮✮

No Starch Press

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2in1

Lego Dakar Truck

Much like shampoo & conditioner, some things are better when they’re two-in-one. And just like your Mom, Angka Utama’s tidy Dakar rally truck always has something inside it.

Secreted underneath the neat 4-wide truck bodywork is another Dakar racer, and the two vehicles fit together so beautifully you’d never know unless you saw the image below. You can see more of Angka’s truck, buggy, and the ingenious way they combine at both Flickr and MOCpages – click the links for double the action.

Lego Dakar Buggy Truck

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