Tag Archives: MAZ

MAZter Builder

OK, it’s not a car, but at least it’s not a bloody Thomas the Tank Engine on legs or a mechanised snail. This rather wonderful MAZ 537 and trailer are the work of colognebrick of Flickr, who has captured the Soviet military transport superbly in small scale. The build is packed with properly ingenious building techniques to add realism beyond the model’s size, including a cab with bricks pointing in almost every direction.

There’s much more to see of colognebrick’s MAZ truck at his photostream, where he hopes to add some cargo at some point soon. Take a look via the link whilst we issue the Elves an ultimatum that involves bringing back a car for us to blog or getting a free one-way ticket for the office catapult…

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Mazzive

This is a MAZ-535; massive, a little aesthetically challenging, and able to get really dirty. Just like your Mom. It comes from Lego-building legend Sariel (whose Build a LEGO Mustang book we reviewed here last week) and it’s a triumph of Technic engineering.

Underneath the wonderfully accurate Model Team exterior, complete with opening doors, engine hatches and LED head and tail lights, is a fully working replica of the MAZ’s incredible 8×8 drivetrain.

Four Power functions XL motors drive all eight wheels, the front four of which turn on separate radiuses. All eight wheels feature planetary hubs and are suspended via pendular axles, allowing Sariel’s model to go anywhere it is possible for a Lego creation to go, or to pull a chair across a wooden floor according to the accompanying video.

A working V12 piston engine is mounted inside, along with a pneumatically operated high/low gearbox providing the model with two speeds (slow, and really slow), and the motorised drive, steering, lighting and gearbox can all be controlled remotely thanks to a third-party SBrick bluetooth control.

There’s much more to see of this amazing creation at Sariel’s MAZ-535 Flickr album, on the Eurobricks forum, or via the video below. Click the links to take a look, plus you can read Sariel’s interview here at The Lego Car Blog by clicking here.

YouTube Video

 

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Russian Rubezh

The Cold War. A fantastically pointless game between two megalomaniacal superpowers that very nearly destroyed half the planet. Still, at least we won’t repeat that mistake again. What’s that? We are?!… Sigh. Better start storing tinned food.

Anyway, this hulk of Soviet terror is a ‘Rubezh’ coastal missile launcher, shown here in East German specification where it was deployed up until the fall of the Soviet Union and Germany’s reunification in 1990.

This expertly recreated mini-figure scale version comes from Ralph Savelsberg (also aptly known as Mad Physicist) of Flickr and there’s more to see of this Cold War monstrosity at his photostream via the link above.

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Dangerous Erection

Lego MAZ, RSD-10 Pioneer SS-20 Saber

This website has featured a few tenuously linked erection puns over the years, but today there’s no tenuousness at all, as this green phallus-on-wheels is actually called an ‘erector-launcher’.

This Cold War era Soviet RSD-10 ‘Pioneer’ ballistic nuclear missile and the amazing MAZ 547 transporter erector-launcher which carried it come from TLCB regular Ralph Savelsberg, and they’re terrifying.

Measuring over 54ft in length, weighing 37 tons, and capable of flying 7,500km whilst carrying up to three warheads by the end of its development, the RSD-10 was at the very forefront of pointless nuclear dick-waving.

Over 650 of the things were produced, but are now thankfully destroyed (bar a few decommissioned for display purposes) after the U.S and the Soviet Union signed an agreement in 1987 to stop being total morons*.

The Soviet Union though, being a model of responsibility, sold a few of the launchers to North Korea, because they’re trustworthy and accountable state nation. Sigh.

There’s more to see of this rather brilliant mini-figure scale recreation of the MAZ 547 and RSD-10 at Ralph’s Flickr album via the link above, and if you fancy seeing a real one you can do so at the Ukraine Air Force Museum in Kiev and at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C.

Or on the streets of Pyongyang in North Korea of course.

Lego MAZ, RSD-10 Pioneer SS-20 Saber*And if you think the U.S is any better, guess who this year pulled out of the agreement that ended the RSD-10 Pioneer’s use… Yeah, this guy.

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A-MAZ-ing

Lego MAZ537 8x8 Remote Control Truck

Last time we mentioned something about a vehicle belonging to Russia’s government forces we got in trouble (despite having been positive in the past too) so today there’ll be no backstory. However none is needed, because this MAZ537 8×8 soviet military truck is incredible.

Lego MAZ537 8x8 Remote Control Truck

Built by gkurkowski of Brickshelf this 3.3kg behemoth is one of the most beautifully recreated replica trucks that we’ve ever featured. With superb detailing both externally and inside, gkurkowski’s MAZ is certainly befitting of the ‘Model Team’ category here at TLCB. However, this creation is much more than a static display piece…

Inside that brilliant body is a full Power Functions remote control drivetrain with power going to all eight wheels shod in LEGO’s huge 42054 Claas Xerion tyres. Each of the four axles is suspended and the first two offer four-wheel-steering powered by a Medium Motor. There’s also a V12 piston engine, LED headlights, a suspended fifth wheel/trailer hitch and opening everything.

Lego MAZ537 8x8 Remote Control Truck

It’s an incredible build and one that definitely deserves a closer look. A full gallery of over thirty images is available to view on Brickshelf, including CAD drawings of the drivetrain and WIP shots, plus you watch gkurkowski’s amazing MAZ537 8×8 in action courtesy of the video below.

YouTube Video:

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Extreme Loggers

Lego MAZ 537 Truck

This monster MAZ-537 logging truck was discovered not by our Elves, who are now sulking, but by one of you. It’s been built by Pavol Vanek of Flickr, and it is quite simply one of the most impressive Technic models we’ve seen this year.

The MAZ-537 was designed for the soviet military (like pretty much everything else from Communist eastern Europe) and was manufactured from 1959 until 1990. It was powered by a 39 litre 12-cylinder diesel engine coupled with a three-speed hydromechanical transmission, featured 4-wheel-steering and 4-wheel-drive, and it could carry 50 ton loads.

Pavol’s superb Lego recreation features all of this (minus the crazy gearbox), plus some clever pneumatics that allow his MAZ-537 to fulfil its post-military civilian role.

There’s lots more to see at Pavol’s photostream – join in the extreme logging here.

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Mini-Fig Mazness!

Lego MAZ TruckThese beautifully built MAZ trucks come from Nexus7.1 on Flickr. Check out the full gallery of these and Nexus’ other creations at his photostream here.

Lego MAZ Truck

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MAZ to the Rescue

MAZ FiretruckFollowing the sinister MAZ 7907 featured earlier this year, the Elves have snaffled another, and this one performs slightly more friendly duties. Nexus7.1‘s MAZ 543 airport fire truck is a beautiful bit of kit, recreated by way of some fiendishly clever brickwork. See the full gallery on Flickr at the link above.

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Russian Monster

Lego Maz 7907This incredible vehicle is a MAZ 7907, built in the 1980s to transport Russian missiles. It was propelled by over 1200bhp, had 24 wheels (all driven), and was more than 28 meters long. Only two were ever built, and thankfully never used for their intended purpose. Only one of the two remains, with the other machine cannibalised to supply parts for the first.

The spectacular recreation of the MAZ 7907 in the picture above is the work of Polish builder Patryk Walerzak. Weighing in at 5.3 KG and at nearly 1.5 meters long,  Patryk’s version is one of the largest Technic creations we’ve ever seen. Inside the monster chassis are 6 Power Functions motors and over 100 gearwheels. Because this awesome machine really works. To find out more visit the Eurobricks discussion page or the Brickshelf gallery.

YouTube Video:

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