Tag Archives: Technic

Go Nuclear

Lego Technic Retrofuturistic Nuclear Car

The news is full of nuclear war hysteria at the moment, thanks to the orange leader of the free world and overweight North Korean despot Kim Jong-un. As a classy blog not interested in clickbait we’re seamlessly jumping on the bandwagon with this, Nico71‘s glorious Fallout 4 inspired retro-futuristic nuclear concept car.

Back in the ’50 and ’60s wild concept cars were all the rage, and were often powered by a variety of unusual fuels, including gas turbines, electricity and yes, even nuclear reaction.

Lego Technic Retrofuturistic Nuclear Car

Nico’s brilliant Technic concept car perfectly captures the ambitions of the age, and it’s clever too, featuring remote control drive and steering, electronically opening doors and a sliding roof canopy, plus working suspension and lights.

Control of the electrically-powered functions is taken care of thanks to a third-party BuWizz bluetooth unit, which allows graduated control via a bluetooth device and delivers up to 8x more power to the motors than LEGO’s own system.

Lego Technic Retrofuturistic Nuclear Car

You can see all of the build details and the full image gallery courtesy of Nico71’s excellent website by clicking here, and you watch the nuclear concept car in action (which is worth doing for the roof mechanism alone!) via the excellent video below.

YouTube Video:

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Towing Technic

Lego Technic Truck Trailer RC

We often feature Technic trucks here at The Lego Car Blog, but what they’re designed to pull less so. Even if a trailer is built, it’s often just a rolling slab of Danish plastic without any functionality whatsoever. Not so with Trawson21‘s latest creation, which packs realistic working features into both ends of the build.

Up front the truck includes remote control drive and steering, pendular suspension, and a working piston engine, whilst the huge trailer in tow includes pneumatically operated support legs and access ramps operated via a manual pump and pneumatic switch.

There’s more to see at Trawson’s Brickshelf gallery, where you can also find a link to a video of the model in action – click the link above to check it out.

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Elves in High Places

Lego Technic Remote Control Mercedes-Benz Crane Truck

The Lego Car Blog Elves are, thankfully, not very big. This unfortunately does make them quite susceptible to being run over, trodden on, and getting eaten by dogs and larger birds, but we never seem to run out of them so there must be procreation going on somehow (we don’t really want think about that though).

It’s therefore unusual to see an Elf anywhere above waist height, but today this TLCB staff writer was met by the forlorn gaze of an Elf sitting on mid-level book shelf when he entered the office. Sigh.

It became apparent that several other Elves were dotted around the building in similar situations, marooned by one of their number’s latest find.

This superb Mecredes-Benz Actros 8×4 crane truck is the work of TLCB regular Shineyu, and it is, as you may have guessed, fully remote controlled. That includes the drive, steering, outriggers, and a huge crane arm, which unusually folds in the middle via a rotating joint, much like your elbow does.

Unfolding this joint via the corresponding Medium Motor and then operating the boom extension makes Shineyu’s appendage surprising long*, and thus the perfect tool for some vertical Elven tomfoolery. See just how big it gets via the link to the Eurobricks forum in the text above.

Lego Technic Remote Control Mercedes-Benz Crane Truck

*Hah.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Death on Wheels

Lego Yamaha YFM 700 Quad Bike

Today’s news is full of the story of America dropping its largest ever non-nuclear bomb on some unsuspecting militants in Afghanistan. Weighing 9,800kgs and at over 3oft in length, the GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast Bomb sure is a devastatingly deadly bit of kit. But we suspect it’s not half as deadly as this, Yamaha’s YFM 700 quad bike.

Designed to roll over on top of you if you so much as look at it, the YFM 700 is the sort of machine that is way, way too fast for almost everyone that will ever climb atop it. But it sure is a cool way to go. This Lego recreation of the lethal Yamaha comes from Flickr’s André Pinto, and thankfully it’s much safer than its full size counterpart. See more at André’s photostream via the link above.

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Trucavator

Lego Technic Tatra Truck Excavator

We don’t see this type of vehicle in TLCB’s home nation, and we’re not really sure why. A hybrid of truck and excavator it seems like quite a useful design, being fast enough to drive on roads without annoying everyone and diggery enough to do some digging when it reaches its destination.

This pneumatically-powered Technic version is based on a Tatra 815 with a UDS excavator mounted to the rear. It’s been built by newcomer Ivan MOC and it features working steering, a V4 piston engine, suspension on all axles, pneumatic stabilisers and boom elevation, manual boom extension and 360° excavator rotation.

There’s more of Ivan’s build to see at Eurobricks and Flickr – click the links if you dig it.

Lego Technic Tatra Truck Excavator

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Double Decker

Lego MAN A95 Bus RC

This slab of cream and brown magnificence is a MAN A95 double decker bus, resplendent in Hong Kong’s KMB livery, and it’s been built by Hong Kong resident and previous bloggee ShineYu.

Lego MAN A95 Double Decker Bus RC

With eight Power Functions motors hidden inside the huge body, ShineYu’s incredible A95 double decker bus not only looks superb but it functions wonderfully too. Two XL motors drive the MAN, whilst two Servos turn the two steering axles. A further four Medium motors power the automatic doors, all of which are controlled remotely.

Lego MAN A95 Double Decker Bus Remote Control

There’s lots more to see of this seriously impressive build at the Eurobricks discussion forum, and you can see ShineYu’s KMB MAN A95 in action via the video below.

YouTube Video:

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

1,277 Days

Lego Liebherr LTM 1090 4.1 Crane Sarens

That’s how long it took builder Dirk Klijn to design, engineer and construct this utterly spellbinding Sarens-liveried Liebherr LTM 1090 4.1 crane, in full road configuration with boom extension and 14 tons of counterweight.

Lego Liebherr LTM Crane Remote Control

Seventeen working motorised functions are controlled by no less than five third-party SBrick devices, making the Liebherr one of the most advanced Lego models that this site had ever featured, and if that wasn’t enough the model also features all-wheel suspension, a manually folding boom jib and two highly detailed accessible cabins.

Lego Remote Control Crane

Dirk’s model is also one of the most visually realistic creations we’ve ever found too, with a wealth of superb detailing further enhanced by custom decals produced by previous bloggee JaapTechnic, and full LED lighting.

Lego Technic Liebherr LTM Crane

A suitably large gallery of stunning imagery is available to view now at Dirk’s Flickr photostream – click this link to jump to Liebherr LTM 1090 4.1’s full album – we’ll see you there.

Lego Liebherr LTM Crane RC

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Rolling a Six

Lego Mercedes-Benz G-Wagon 6x6

What’s better off-road than a four-wheel-drive vehicle? A six-wheel-drive vehicle of course. In fact by TLCB arithmetic it’s a whole two better.

Eurobricks’ KevinMoo also clearly favours the ‘more is more’ approach and has built his latest creation – loosely based on Mercedes-Benz’s nuts 6×6 G-Wagon – accordingly. With twin L motor drive going to all six wheels and all-round multi-link live axle suspension Kevin has constructed quite a capable machine, and – as a by-product of trying to reduce the stress on LEGO’s famously weak U-Joint pieces – a reasonably quick one too, as there’s little gearing-down at work in the drivetrain.

Lego Mercedes-Benz G-Wagon 6x6 RC

Remote control coupled with reasonable speed does of course mean a few of our Elves have been squished in the making of this blog post, but hey – blogging’s not without the odd sacrifice. It also meant that, once the Elf at the controls was found, fed, and then ejected from the building, we could take a good look at the internal workings of Kevin’s build.

Lego Technic 6x6 RC

As you can see from the image above, the 6×6 fully suspended drivetrain is a remarkably compact piece of engineering, and unlike the real 6×6 G-Wagon it’s made possible by the unusual step of not constructing a separate chassis, but rather a monocoque or ‘unibody’ whereby the body and chassis are designed as one unit.

Lego Technic Mercedes-Benz 6x6 RC

In addition to the clever drivetrain Kevin’s build also features LED lights front and rear, Servo steering, and opening doors, hood and tailgate. There’s lots more to see at the Eurobricks forum, plus you watch the 6×6 in action via the video below.

YouTube Video:

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Technic 42064 Ocean Explorer | Review

LEGO Technic 42064 Ocean Explorer Review

It’s review time here at The Lego Car Blog, as the first of 2017’s Technic sets is placed under the microscope. Reader and previous bloggee Nils O has got his hands on the new 42064 Ocean Explorer set, and he joins us here at TLCB Towers to let you know whether you should get your hands on it too. Over to Nils…

Worth a second look?

OK, this isn’t a car, but it’s Lego Technic and it’s a vehicle. So, who cares…? When I saw TLCB’s preview for the first 2017 Technic sets I was a little disappointed by the picture of the 42064 Ocean Explorer. It was already written in the blogpost that the model looked more like a City set than like a Technic model, and there weren’t many Technic functions visible on the photos.

Despite this, I really liked the look of the ship, so I thought that I’d give it a second look when the set became available in stores. When I finally saw the set I was pleasantly surprised; it really had enough functions to wear that Technic logo on the box. So I made a wish for my birthday and now I’ve got it!

Ok, so what do we get? We get quite a big ship with a clean, studless, almost LEGO City like look. We also get a small submarine and a small helicopter. Each of the three models has one or more Technic functions. The scale is more or less in line with LEGO City, so if you like you can use a crew of mini-figures with it.

First of all there is the ship, a big explorer vessel of the type you would expect to search for a sunken ship or to explore the deep sea fauna. There are three ‘hidden’ functions operated by ‘HOG’ gears on top of of the ship’s bridge. The first function is the steering of the ship. The model has four little wheels for smooth movement on the floor. The rear wheels have a steering function operated by the bigger gear mounted in the centre of the bridge. The steering is also connected to two steering rudders on the rear end of the vessel. The second and third function are for the operation of the crane. The crane can be rotated and lifted by turning the two smaller gears on the left and right side of the bridge. It works perfectly to drop the submarine into the ‘water’ and get it back on board.

The second model is a little deep sea submarine. It’s quite small, but it has two Technic functions built inside. One gear is connected to the rear propellers, so when you turn it, they turn too, whilst the second gear is connected to a mechanism that opens and closes the pair of robot arms like a pair of pliers. With a little practice you can grab ‘specimens’ and bring them back to the vessel.

The third model is a small helicopter. Even though it’s smaller in size than most LEGO City helicopters it has the typical Technic helicopter function of both rotors being connected to an ‘operation gear’ outside the model, allowing them to spin simultaneously. Both smaller models – the submarine and the helicopter – have a canopy big enough to carry a mini-figure, and by adding one or more ‘half pins with a stud’ you can even fix the figures inside.

So, after all, the 42064 Ocean Explorer is really worth a second look, and for me it really was worth buying it. My son loves it, too. For him it’s like his LEGO City models, just better. I think it could also be cool to see all the functions of the vessel motorised with Power Functions elements (hmm, I think I see a new project appearing on the horizon…).

Thanks to Nils O for joining us as a Guest Reviewer to add another set to the Set Review Library. If you’d like to write a set review as Nils has you can; simply get in touch with us via the usual channels.

LEGO Technic 42064 Ocean Explorer Review
Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Picking Fruit

Lego Technic Cherry Picker

We don’t think we can ever recall seeing a cherry picker actually picking cherries. Fixing light bulbs, telephone wires and cutting trees, yes. Picking cherries, not so much.

Lego RC Crane

Still, whatever the inaccuracies of the name, this remote control Technic cherry picker from Anto of Eurobricks is a very accomplished build. Remotely operable functions include the drive, motorised outriggers, a rotating turntable and an elevating crane boom, whilst mechanics take care of the steering and boom extension.

Lego Technic Cherry Picker

There’s lots more to see of Anto’s creation at the Eurobricks forum via the link above, plus you watch the cherry picker in action via the video below.

YouTube Video

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Orange Crush

Lego Technic Zil 130

Another day, another find, another Elven catastrophe to tidy up. Following this week’s earlier Elf squashing our workforce has been in a cautious but nevertheless vengeful mood.

And so one of the week’s earlier victims found itself at the controls of a vehicle capable of exacting a hit-and-run based revenge. With the Elves it doesn’t really matter if the perpetrator of a previous act is actually present when the revenge is served, just as long as someone gets squished. And squished they were.

Lego Technic Zil 130 MMZ Truck

The vehicle in question is this absolutely wonderful ZiL 130 MMZ 555 tipper truck, in perfectly-suited Porsche 911 GT3 orange, as built by previous bloggee Samolot. In a convenient metaphor for the communist economy that spawned it, the Zil was the ideal tool for crushing the people, or in this case, Elves.

Remote control drive with a remotely controlled four speed gearbox, and a novel linear actuator based steering system give this ZiL 130 a surprising turn of speed, certainly enough to catch out a few slower Elves, whilst all-wheel suspension allowed the truck to roll over them with ease. Unrelated to the smushing, but a cool feature nonetheless, Samolot’s Zil 130 also includes a remotely controlled dumping mechanism powered by a Medium Motor, taking the total motor-count to four.

Lego Technic Zil 130 MMZ Truck

Opening doors, a working steering wheel, and an opening hood all feature too, and Samolot has included a level of detail that’s now becoming typical with many Technic builds that moves the theme ever closer to Model Team in terms of aesthetics.

There’s a whole lot more to see of Samolot’s superb ZiL 130 dump truck via Brickshelf, MOCpages and the Eurobricks forum, plus you watch all the working features in action courtesy of the excellent video below.

YouTube Video:

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

BMW F700 GS Rallye

Lego BMW F700 GS Rallye

LEGO’s new partnership with BMW Motorrad has already produced a brilliant looking Technic set in the form of the 42063 R 1200 GS Adventure motorbike. Joining it in a matching scale is this superb F700 GS Rallye built by Flickr’s ianying616, who has recreated BMW’s mid-spec tourer wonderfully in the latest Technic style, adding some neat Model Team detail touches whilst retaining Technic functionality. Steering, shaft drive, and a two-cylinder boxer engine all feature, and there’s more to see at ianying’s photostream.

Lego BMW F700 GS Rallye

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Candy Crush

Lego Technic Volvo FMX 4x4 Crawler RC

It’s been a slow (read ‘hungry’) week for The Lego Car Blog Elves. However, with their empty stomachs ‘motivating’ them it was only a matter of time before we’d have a creation to share with you.

The hungry Elf responsible for today’s find was duly awarded a meal token and Smartie, upon which something remarkable happened… the Elf ate about half of its Smartie, and it then proceeded to break the rest into pieces. Were we about to witness the first ever moment of Elven compassion and sharing? Were we balls.

The aforementioned Elf scattered the Smartie pieces opposite a curtain in the office and then scurried off. Soon several of its colleagues had sniffed out the unguarded confectionary and landed on the abandoned loot like seagulls on an open bin.

But unguarded the confectionary wasn’t, and the curtains suddenly parted as a huge white truck powered through them. The nearest Elf had just enough time to point and scream before being squashed forcefully into the office carpet, before its scavenging colleagues met the same fate.

A jubilant Elf then re-emerged, scooped up the Smartie remnants, and ran off cackling madly. Sigh. We thought they were getting bored of this.

Still, kudos the Elf in question, which had deployed some remarkable inventiveness to overcome its find’s lack of speed – which normally would have left it unable meet out any smushings.

The vehicular weapon, whilst slow, is a mighty impressive bit of kit though. Based on a Volvo FMX truck, the build features five Power Functions motors that power the four-wheel-drive system, generate air pressure for pneumatically locking differentials, and drive the centrally-pivoted steering, whilst pendular suspension with simply ludicrous articulation and oversize tyres from the 42054 Claas Xerion tractor set take care of truck’s impressive rock-crawling ability.

The build is the work of TLCB debutant dgustafsson1317 and there’s an enormous gallery of high quality images available to view on Flickr. Click the link above to see all of the Volvo FMX Crawler photos, whilst we scrape some very flat Elves out of the office carpet.

Lego Technic Volvo FMX 4x4 Crawler RC

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Technic 40th Anniversary | Super Secret Set!

Lego Technic 40th Anniversary Car Chassis

Lego Technic is 40 years old this year! Launched in 1977 the Technic range took LEGO into a new world of technical detail, providing advanced construction for older children and adults alike, and bringing with it probably the largest range of new parts in the brand’s history.

It all kicked off with a simple car chassis, a ‘New Technical Set’, 853. The single most viewed page here at TLCB, 853 introduced rack and pinion steering, a working piston engine and an operable transmission to LEGO fans. Its success allowed LEGO to develop the theme and three years later the second generation car chassis was released, this time with LEGO’s first attempt at working suspension, 8860.

Despite being LEGO’s second Technic car chassis, 8860 is often thought of as the daddy of all Technic sets, paving the way for the series of Technic Supercars that followed (of which you can read more in the Set Review Library).

With the Technic theme turning 40 years old this year LEGO have decided to pay homage to one of their greatest products, giving builders the chance to recreate the iconic 1980 set using modern parts found in the 2017 Technic  range. Three sets, the superb-looking 42063 BMW R 1200 GS Adventure motorbike, the 42061 Telehandler and the 42057 Ultralight Helicopter provide the pieces required, and building instructions are now available* for free online.

Such is the way with the advancement of technology, LEGO’s modern take on the classic 8860 set packs all the functions of the original into a more compact package, and features working steering, a 4-cylinder boxer engine, an operable transmission (which may well be the first since the 1980s not to use purpose-built gearbox parts) and functioning rear suspension. The design uses straight-forward pieces too, so many builders may be able to build it from parts found within their existing collection.

You can read our previews of the three sets that supply the full parts list to build the 40th Anniversary 8860 set via the links above, our review of the original set here, and you can create your very own 40th Anniversary set by clicking the link to the building instructions below.

Download building instructions here!

Lego Technic 40th Anniversary Set

*Thanks to a reader for the tip!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

We Got Nukes, We Got Knives, Sharp Sticks…

Lego Aliens APC

…and a dropship containing an M577 armoured personnel carrier. The Weyland-Yutani Corporation’s APC was one of the earliest casualties in the 1986 sci-fi horror Aliens, destroying its transaxle to escape alien attack. Still, everyone else got out OK didn’t they?…

Lego Aliens APC Remote Control Sariel

This stunning recreation of the M577 APC from the Aliens movie comes from Technic legend, previous bloggee, and ‘Become a Pro‘ interviewee Pawel ‘Sariel’ Kmiec.

Sariel’s incredible creation packs in all the firepower of the original movie vehicle, with a 360° rotating, fully retractable sliding rear turret, twin roof-mounted opening missile pods, a rotating and elevating front turret, an electrically sliding cabin door, all-wheel-drive and all-wheel-steering with pendular suspension, and full LED lighting.

Lego Aliens APC

All of that can be controlled remotely thanks to a third-party SBrick bluetooth system, allowing the half-a-metre long APC to be operated via a smartphone.

To truly see what Sariel’s spectacular creation can do we highly recommend taking a look at the brilliant video below, plus you can see all the images of the M577 APC via both Flickr and MOCpages.

And whilst you’re checking out the video and those links, we’re going to take the APC’s controls and put the fear of God into our Elven workforce…

YouTube Video:

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: