Tag Archives: Technic

Elven Conundrum

This TLCB Writer uttered something containing such wildly offensive profanity when he entered TLCB Towers this morning that even this site, a cesspool of litany, is unable to publish it.

Elves (and Elven bodily fluids) were everywhere. Squashed into the carpet, slammed against walls, wandering round in circles being sick – clearly something had arrived into the halls of the building with a capability for Elven destruction unmatched in the history of this establishment’s existence.

At the end of the corridor, upside-down with a wheel missing, that ‘something’ was discovered. This is it, Kirill Mazurov (aka Desert Kirill / desert752)’s incredible ‘SUV Racer MK II’.

Sitting on top of LEGO’s enormous 42054 Claas Xerion 5000 tyres, powered by four hub-mounted Buggy Motors, with portal axles, independent suspension, and a pair of BuWizz bluetooth bricks delivering eight times the power of LEGO’s own system, Kirill’s creation takes Lego to a place where it probably shouldn’t be.

It’s also a model that the Elves would absolutely love, had they not been chased down and flattened by it. A racing stripe (in orange no less) and Rally Fighter-esque bodywork give Kirill’s model an unusually racy exterior for an off-roading machine, whilst the rear looks a bit like a 1980s Alfa Romeo GTV.

We have no idea where the Elf is that found it, as the culprit has disappeared after overturning their find in the corridor, but it’ll be back later to claim a meal token. Before then we have a lot of tidying up to do, and possibly a few visits to the Elf ‘Hospital’ to make too, so whilst we get on with that (this job absolutely does not pay enough) you can check out more of Kirill’s amazing creation at both his Flickr photostream and at the Eurobricks discussion forum.

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Retro Rampage

Whiiiir! Crunch. Whiiiir! Crunch. Elven Screaming. Whiiiir! Crunch.

Sigh. These are sounds we’ve heard too often here at The Lego Car Blog Towers before, and they usually mean we’re going to have to get the carpets cleaned again.

A weary trudge to the corridor outside the office revealed the cause, and to our surprise there wan’t just one, but three. Three Elves were each controlling three separate (and rather impressive) Technic Monster Trucks, bashing them into one another and occasionally adding variety to the proceedings by driving them at and over the Elves who had come to watch the spectacle.

It admittedly looked like great fun, so Mr. Airhorn was deployed to break up the ruckus, the injured were patched up with Pritt-Stick and plasters, and we’ve taken control of the trio of Technic trucks for ourselves.

Each truck comes from Technic building legend Madoca77 and wears a gloriously retro livery, including the famous Ford ‘Big Foot’ colours and Toyota’s wonderful ’80s ‘pick-up’ stripe, and the three models are all remotely operable via bluetooth thanks to two SBricks.

These control the four XL motors (one per wheel), the two Servo motors that steer both the front and rear axles, the Medium motor that switches between crab steering and normal steering modes (just like LEGO’s excellent 40254 Claas Xerion 5000 set), and the Medium motor that operates the clamshell bodywork lift.

Madoca’s builds also include LED headlights, opening doors and dropping tailgates, plus – most importantly – a mega suspension setup which includes portal axles. They easily make it into our favourite creations list of 2019, and if you like them as much as we do then head to the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above to read more about the builds and to watch a video of Madoca’s vintage monster truck design in action!

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T600

This might sound like a Terminator robot, but it is in fact a Kenworth truck, in this case recreated brilliantly in Technic form by anatolich aka Artur Volu. Artur’s Technic T600 not only looks the part, it’s absolutely packed with spectacular functionality, all of which can be controlled via bluetooth thanks to two SBricks. Remote control drive, steering, and a lockable fifth wheel all feature, as do suspended seats, a working V8 engine, and pendular suspension. That’s not all either, as Artur has constructed an enormous Michigan eight-axle trailer to accompany the T600 which also features a host of remotely controlled functions. Head to Artur’s Flickr photostream or the Eurobricks discussion forum to see images of the complete rig.

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Super Stratos Stradale

The Lancia Stratos was not a good road car. Uncomfortable, unreliable, and almost comically badly designed, there’s a reason that Lancia are barely around today (and so sad is their current single offering it’d probably be better if they weren’t. What’s going on Fiat?!). However, the Lancia Stratos rally car was a very different matter…

Powered by a mid-mounted Ferrari V6 the Stratos won three consecutive World Rally Championships, in ’74, ’75 and ’76. It might have won more too, were it not for parent company Fiat switching their focus (and therefore funding) to their own brand in ’77.

Such results have made the Lancia Stratos a hugely sought after car, despite the road variants being pretty rubbish. A better bet (and probably better built) is this Technic version from James Tillson, which recreates the Stratos brilliantly in Lego form.

Like the real car the front and rear bodywork opens, revealing the transversly-mounted V6 engine, working suspension, and functioning steering, with remote control delivered by Power Functions motors and a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery.

There’s more to see of James’ Technic Lancia Stratos in both Stradale and Group B specification on Flickr and at the Eurobricks forum – take a look via the links in the text above, plus you can read our review of the BuWizz bluetooth battery that controls and powers it by clicking here.

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Mazzive

This is a MAZ-535; massive, a little aesthetically challenging, and able to get really dirty. Just like your Mom. It comes from Lego-building legend Sariel (whose Build a LEGO Mustang book we reviewed here last week) and it’s a triumph of Technic engineering.

Underneath the wonderfully accurate Model Team exterior, complete with opening doors, engine hatches and LED head and tail lights, is a fully working replica of the MAZ’s incredible 8×8 drivetrain.

Four Power functions XL motors drive all eight wheels, the front four of which turn on separate radiuses. All eight wheels feature planetary hubs and are suspended via pendular axles, allowing Sariel’s model to go anywhere it is possible for a Lego creation to go, or to pull a chair across a wooden floor according to the accompanying video.

A working V12 piston engine is mounted inside, along with a pneumatically operated high/low gearbox providing the model with two speeds (slow, and really slow), and the motorised drive, steering, lighting and gearbox can all be controlled remotely thanks to a third-party SBrick bluetooth control.

There’s much more to see of this amazing creation at Sariel’s MAZ-535 Flickr album, on the Eurobricks forum, or via the video below. Click the links to take a look, plus you can read Sariel’s interview here at The Lego Car Blog by clicking here.

YouTube Video

 

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Czech Mate

We are SO BORED of Brexit. Every day, all day, people shouting at one another. Racism, classism, elitism… every ‘ism’ you could wish for in one painfully tedious and never-ending argument.

So whatever your political persuasion (and as Americans make up the largest nationality of our readership we suspect the answer is probably this), here’s a celebration of European achievement in the face of considerable adversity.

This is the Tatra T600 ‘Tatraplan’, an almost spectacularly futuristic design produced by Tatra from 1948 from within a country battered by war and then shackled by the yoke of Communism thanks to a coup d’état that took place in the same year the car launched.

Unfortunately Czech Communism lasted considerably longer than the T600 (right up until the Velvet Revolution of 1989), by which point Tatra had almost completely wound down car production to focus on its (excellent) heavy-duty trucks, but we look upon the quirky Tatra with considerably more favour than the Communist regime that ruled during its production run.

The T600 was a large (six seat) family car powered by a 2-litre flat-four engine, featuring a monocoque chassis and with a wonderful streamlined body. Just over 6,000 units were produced during its three-year production run and the whole TLCB team would take one over a typical modern family car (which are mostly as boring as Brexit) in heartbeat.

This lovely Technic recreation of the Tatra T600 comes from Kent Kashiwabara of Flickr, and not only has he captured the car’s beautiful lines rather well in Technic form, he’s also given his model a flat-four engine, working steering, and full suspension underneath. There’s more to see of Kent’s excellent T600 on Flickr via the link above, which is where we’ll be pretending we live somewhere else other than the UK right now….

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Two Boxes and Eighteen Wheels

This wonderful Technic Kenworth W900 with container transport trailer was discovered on Eurobricks today, and it might be the most understatedly cool truck of the year so far. It’s not Christmas-treed with lights, festooned with stickers, or even bedecked with chrome. What it is, is quietly brilliant.

Built by MajklSpajkl for his LUG’s Lego exhibition, the truck and trailer measure well over 100 studs long and include some superb functionality. The truck itself includes remote control drive (thanks to a single L Motor) and steering (via a Servo), with another L Motor operating the fifth-wheel lock. A battery box hidden inside the cab provides the power whilst LEGO’s own IR Receiver or a BuWizz bluetooth brick allow the functions to be controlled remotely.

The trailer isn’t devoid of functions either, with its own concealed battery box providing power to raise and lower the support legs via a Medium motor. Pendular suspension features on the both the truck and trailer, and the Kenworth W900 truck also includes opening can doors, plus a moderately detailed interior and engine.

There’s more to see of this superb creation at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, and you can read our review of LEGO’s own container truck set, the enormous 42078 Mack Anthem, by clicking here.

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Ride-On LEGO

Every Lego fan has wanted to do it. We’ve all imagined what it would be like, dreaming that one day, if we tried hard enough, it might just be possible. And some have even got close. No, we’re not referring to talking to a girl, but building a real, ride-on, controllable Lego creation.

That unrealised dream has now become a reality for the guys at third-party bluetooth brick builders BuWizz, who have built an actual ride-on go-kart (OK, ‘mobility scooter’ might be a better description…) from seven thousand LEGO pieces!

Thirty-two Large Power Functions motors power all four wheels (via individual in-wheel motors actually, meaning their creation could feature torque vectoring!), with eight BuWizz bricks providing the power and control via the BuWizz mobile app. They’ve even managed to talk to a girl and convince her drive it.

You can watch their amazing creation in action via the video below and read more about it at the BuWizz website, plus if you’d like to learn more about the little bluetooth battery control that allows a creation like this to happen you can read our review of the BuWizz brick here.

YouTube Video

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Scania S730

Every so often one of our Elves finds a creation that makes us all go ‘whoa’. This is one of those times. This spectacular Scania S730 comes from mpj of Eurobricks at it’s beautiful. One of the finest looking Technic trucks we’ve seen, helped by some brilliant custom decals, mpj‘s Scania also features remote control drive and steering, SBrick bluetooth control, pneumatic rear suspension and a highly detailed cab interior. There’s more to see of this superb build at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above or at the Brickshelf gallery here – click the links to make the jump.

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Ghostly Creation

It’s nearly Halloween!* The unique time of year when kids can pressure the elderly into giving them chocolate, girls can make literally any outfit sexy, and we find a tenuous link between the season of spookiness and an almost completely unrelated Lego model…

This is an almost completely unrelated Lego model. Created by Master MOCer and Technic building legend Paul Boratko (aka Crowkillers) it’s called the ‘Copia’ and has been built in homage to the Swedish rock band ‘Ghost’, of whom we have never heard but who have enabled this year’s tenuous Halloween link.

With all-wheel-drive, working steering, a mid-mounted V10 engine, D-N-R gearbox with functioning steering wheel paddles, independent suspension, and opening doors, hood and engine cover, Crowkillers’ latest creation checks every Technic ‘Supercar’ box and a few more too. Although it does have very little to do with Halloween (and Swedish rock bands as far as we can tell).

Suggested to us by a reader there’s much more to see of Crowkillers’ ‘Copia’ supercar tribute to ‘Ghost’ at his Bricksafe album and on Brickshelf, plus you can watch a video demonstrating the model’s features complete with a ‘Ghost’ soundtrack on YouTube by clicking here.

*Or – as a one-off for 2019 only – Brexit-geddon

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Sand’s Going to Get Everywhere…

If you think sand gets everywhere at the beach, try driving one of these things. Fifteen minutes in a sand buggy and there’ll be sand in places you didn’t know you had.

This excellent Technic rendition of a skeletally-framed sand-insertion device comes from Dicky Laban of Flickr, and includes front and rear suspension as well as working steering thanks to LEGO’s x136 wishbones and new wheel hub pieces. See more to see via the link.

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Plus Size

LEGO’s new Control+ app has finally brought bluetooth control to LEGO sets. Available on the new 42100 Technic Liebherr R 980 excavator set, the largest set LEGO have ever produced, the Control+ app allows all seven motors to be operated, and programmed, via a mobile device.

But what if the new app was used to control something a bit… larger?

Weighing 890 tons and with around 4,000 bhp the real Liebherr R 9800 excavator is the third largest excavator in the world and it has, courtesy of LEGO and TLCB Master MOCer Sariel, been turned into the world’s largest remote control toy.

With a suite of ingenious motorised Technic mechanisms installed in the cab the real Liebherr R 9800’s controls could be operated remotely through the new LEGO Control+ app, allowing it to drive, steer and excavate via a mobile phone just like the 42100 set. Only on a much much bigger scale.

Take a look a video above to see how the team did it, and get some ideas for how to control your annoying neighbour’s Honda Odessey through your phone…

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Honey, I shrunk the 42100

LEGO’s 42100 Technic Liebherr R 9800 is the largest Technic set ever produced. With over 4,100 pieces, seven electric motors, bluetooth control and a $450 price tag, we’re fairly sure that most MOCs will be quite a lot smaller than LEGO’s latest Goliath. Cyberdyne Systems hasn’t let that stifle his ambition though, building this tiny mechanical version of the mighty 42100 set and equipping it with all* the functionality of its much bigger brother.

The bucket arm can swing, raise and extend mechanically via linear actuators (and much finger twiddling we suspect), whilst the bucket itself can both tilt thanks to a worm gear and open by pulling on a string.

There’s more to see of Cyberdyne’s 42100-in-miniature at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above where you can also find a video of it in action.

*Kinda.

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Tanky Picker

This is a Foremost Chieftain R, a high-speed rubber-tracked personnel and cargo carrier, and it looks like a cherry picker and a tank have had one hell of an accident.

This amazing Technic version of Foremost’s bizarre tank-cherry-picker-thingy has been built by Thesuperkoala of Flickr who has packed it with incredible mechanised functionality.

Like the real Chieftain R, Koala’s Technic version features four powered tracks separated front to rear by a central articulated pivot. LEGO’s linear actuators operate the steering of Koala’s model whilst Power Functions motors provide the drive for these and the four tracks.

Mounted upon the rear section of the Chieftain is a large motorised cherry picker crane, with further linear actuators driving the boom raising/lowering and extension. The crane superstructure can also rotate, with four motorised stabilisers ensuring the Chieftain doesn’t tip over whilst it’s, er… picking cherries(?).

Koala’s creation is a hugely impressive build and one well worth a closer look. Head to Thesuperkoala’s Foremost Chieftain R album on Flickr via the link above to view the full gallery of excellent imagery.

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Dozing Dozers

‘Twas a night nowhere near Christmas, when all through the house, not a creature was stirring…

Until a remote controlled bulldozer powered through the Elves’ cages. Elven screaming, fleeing and smushing followed, until the jubilant Elf at the controls was apprehended and removed from TLCB Towers. Annoyingly we’ll have to give it a meal for its mischief too.

Until then, let’s take a look at the cause of the ruckus; this superb fully remote controlled Technic bulldozer built by damjan97PL / damianple. With twin XL motors, one powering each track, and a motorised front blade and rear ripper courtesy of two Medium motors, damjan’s ‘dozer is a simple yet very effective machine.

A third-party SBrick allows the model to be operated via Bluetooth and it also includes opening cabin doors and a suspended driver’s seat. There’s much more to see of the RC bulldozer at both the Eurobricks forum (where a video can also be found) and via Brickshelf – click the links to make the jump.

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