Tag Archives: Technic

Paint the Roof Red

We tend not to publish models that don’t use LEGO bricks here at The Lego Car Blog. After all, the clue is the our name. However modifying LEGO bricks is grey – or in the is case red – area, as proven by Steph Ouell‘s brilliant ‘Raven’ Technic Supercar.

The nerdier Lego fans among you will know that those curvy Technic panels on the roof and fenders aren’t available in red yet (although we’re sure they will be one day), so Steph has resorted to Chinese knock-offs to complete the Raven. And it looks fantastic.

A working V8 engine, 4-speed gearbox, steering, and independent suspension make up the mechanicals and there’s more to see of Steph’s ‘Raven’ Supercar on Flickr via the link.

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Steam Powered Velocipede

The current craze for e-bikes shows that mankind’s propensity to make literally everything lazier continues unabated. However we’re not new in our quest to eradicate all forms of exercise, as back in the late 1800s our forebears had the same idea, first creating the ‘steam powered velocipede‘ which we want based upon its name alone, and later strapping a steam engine to a penny farthing, to eliminate all that inconvenient pedalling. Remarkably they worked too.

Cue TLCB Master MOCer and all-round Technic-building genius Nico71, who has created his own ‘steam’ powered bicycle (or velocipede as we shall now call it), equipped with a single cylinder Lego Pneumatic Engine, that – when fed with ‘steam’ (compressed air) – powers the velocipede through a two speed gearbox.

Every element of Nico’s machine is LEGO, including an ingenious design that genuinely ‘throttles’ the amount of air entering the engine controlled via a handlebar-mounted lever, a flywheel for maintaining the engine’s smoothness, and a working rear brake.

It’s all preposterously clever and best of all Nico has made instructions available so that you can build you very own Steam Powered Velocipede at home, which we genuinely might do! Head to Brickshelf to see all the imagery, Nico’s excellent website for full details and building instructions, and you can watch this remarkable contraption in action via the video below.

YouTube Video

 

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C-Plane

The prizes from TLCB’s Lockdown B-Model Competition are winging their way to the winners, but we haven’t seen the end of B-Model building. Tomas Vic (aka Tomik) entered several high-scoring models into the competition and has added another to his excellent back-catalogue of alternate creations.

His latest is technically a ‘C-Model’, seeing as the 42106 set upon which it’s derived already has a B-Model, but we call all alternates ‘B-Models’ here at TLCB so we don’t end up with a list as non-sensical as Mercedes’ model range.

Tomik’s rather splendid aircraft looks good enough to be a Technic set in its own right, and uses the donor set’s Pull-Back Motor to simultaneously drive both the landing gear and the propellors.

Instructions for Tomik’s build are available and you can find a link to them along with the complete image gallery on both Flickr and at the Eurobricks forum. Click the links above to take off.

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Racy Orange

No, not another tenuously linked Trump post* (we said racy orange, not racist orange), rather previous bloggee Zsolt Nagy (aka kodlovag)’s exceedingly orange remote control racer.

Utlising LEGO’s new Control+ bluetooth components, Zsolt’s ‘WTCC Race Car’ features two XL motors to drive the rear wheels and L motor to steer, whilst the front wheels also turn an inline 4-cylinder engine, true to most real-world WTCC racers.

All-wheel suspension plus an opening hood and doors are also included, and there’s more to see of Zsolt’s orange racer at both his ‘WTCC Race Car’ album on Flickr and at the Eurobricks discussion forum – click the links to take a look.

*We suppose it is another one now. Never mind.

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Hot and Steamy

Now that the title has pulled in a few people expecting to see something rather different, here’s a traction engine. This Case steam tractor comes from Nikolaus Löwe (aka Mr_Kleinstein) of Flickr, and not only does it look rather wonderful (unless you’re here hoping to see something else of course), it features remote control too, thanks to LEGO’s ace Power Functions system. Head to Nikolaus’ ‘Case Steam Tractor’ album via the link above to see more.

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Lego Land Cruiser 76

The Toyota Land Cruiser is the world’s infamous off-roader. Which means in some corners it’s very probably the most infamous vehicle of any kind. This is the 70-Series, produced since 1984 and which is still being manufactured today, specifically the medium-wheelbase ’76’ passenger version, recreated brilliantly in Technic form by previous bloggee Kevin Moo.

Wonderfully accurate on the outside, Kevin’s Land Cruiser is packed with remote control functions too, allowing the model to navigate the wilds of his back garden with ease. A third-party SBrick provides the 76 with programmable bluetooth control, with all-wheel-drive, steering, and LED lights, plus the build includes working suspension, and opening doors, hood and tailgate.

Full details of Kevin’s awesome Toyota Land Cruiser 76 can be found at the Eurobricks forum by Eurbricks discussion forum, where a link to building instructions can also be found so you can build your very own! Click the link above to take a look, or below to see Kevin’s brilliant build in action.

YouTube Video:

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Lego Land Rover

This TLCB Writer is starting to see the new Land Rover Defender all over the place and, egh… he’s still not sure about it. As a cantankerous old goat he would rather have this one, from back before the Defender was even named as such, the Land Rover Series II.

This superb Technic recreation of the classic 4×4 comes from Kent Kashiwabara of Flickr, who has not only replicated the iconic look beautifully, his soft top ’90’ Landy also includes all-wheel-drive, working steering, an inline-four engine, and live-axle suspension.

There’s more to see of Kent’s model at his ‘Series II’ album via the link above, and with LEGO now having a partnership with Land Rover, perhaps an official classic Land Rover set is in the making…

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The Osprey is Dead

Like the Dodo, and those pointy-beaked flappy dinosaurs that killed everyone in Jurassic World, the Osprey is dead. At least LEGO’s version is. Following a petition by the German Peace Society, the new 1,636 piece set due for release in 2020 has been cancelled, on the grounds of it being a military vehicle (which we suppose it is), a category that LEGO have steadfastly tried to avoid in the past.

LEGO’s statement on the cancellation reads;

The LEGO Technic Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey was designed to highlight the important role the aircraft plays in search and rescue efforts. While the set clearly depicts how a rescue version of the plane might look, the aircraft is only used by the military.  We have a long-standing policy not to create sets which feature real military vehicles, so it has been decided not to proceed with the launch of this product.

We appreciate that some fans who were looking forward to this set may be disappointed, but we believe it’s important to ensure that we uphold our brand values. 

Which probably means if you managed to get hold of a LEGO Technic 42113 Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey set before the cancellation it’ll soon be worth at least $1 billion to those nerdy collectors who never take the bricks out of the box.

We’re not sure what we think about this one. We were rather surprised that LEGO released a military aircraft as a set (even one with no weapons), but we’re more surprised that they’ve now cancelled it, given the huge amount of work (and money) that will have gone into developing it for sale.

We guess we’ll stick to firing the machine guns on the 10262 Aston Martin DB5 007 set or the cannons on a LEGO pirate ship to get our LEGO violence fix instead.

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Seeing Red


Another day, and another Elf returned to the dilapidated hovel that is TLCB’s office.

Triumphantly we might add, for it was riding atop this superb SBrick-controlled RC trophy truck by offroadcreations of Eurobricks. Whereupon it immediately went on the rampage and squashed as many of its colleagues as it could. Because of course it did.

Servo steering and XL drive combined with independent front and live axle rear suspension made the Elves on the floor easy pickings, so whilst we tidy up and possibly take a few of the casualties to ‘Elf Hospital’ you can see more of offroadcreations’ Technic trophy truck at the Eurobricks forum via the link above.

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Shafted

Motorbikes, like pedal bikes, tend to use a chain to transfer power from the engine to the rear wheel. However they’re usually (but not always) slightly more powerful than the average human, so the chain is often the weak point. Plus it can eat trouser legs and flick oil all over the place, thus the shaft-drive was developed.

Working in the same way a car’s driveline does, the chain is replaced by a rotating shaft and a gear assembly, which makes a shaft-drive more expensive and heavier than a chain, but better in pretty much every other respect. Plus it sounds a bit rude.

Flickr’s František Hajdekr has chosen the latter option for his Technic BMW-esque motorcycle, a brand that has used shaft-drive designs for much of their range (including the R 1200 GS Adventure immortalised in the ace 42063 Technic set). Working steering, rear suspension, and a seat made from Batman’s chest also feature, and you can see more of František’s shaft-driven bike at his photostream via the link.

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Making the Grade

Slow, ponderous, usual looking, yet servicing the needs of countless motorists*, road graders are always the bridesmaid when it comes to LEGO. They have appeared as B-Models several times over the years, but we don’t think that they’ve ever made it onto the front of the box. Which is shame really, as they’re more technically complex than much of what drives on the roads they help to build.

Helping to rectify this is Jundis of Eurobricks, who has built this amazing Technic Caterpillar 120M2 motorgrader with an enormous array of functions.

Pneumatics allow the front blade and rear ripper to raise and lower, whilst the middle blade can move up, down, sideways and tilt, thanks to three separate pneumatic cylinders. The model features a variety of mechanical functions too, including working steering (both via the front wheels and central articulation), plus blade turning, pitch, and lateral movement.

It’s a properly clever creation and one that’s definitely worth a closer inspection. Head to the Eurobricks forum via the link above to read the Caterpillar’s full build details and watch a video of all those functions at work.

*Just like your Mom.

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B-Buggy

TLCB Lock-Down B-Model Competition judging is in progress, with around forty different creations making the shortlist. Our contest partners at SBrick are adding their votes, after which we’ll announce the Winner and Runner-Up (each of whom will receive some fantastic prizes!), but in the meantime here’s a bonus B-Model build, created by offroadcreations of Eurobricks.

Built only from the parts found within the 42039 Technic 24 Hours Race Car (apart from the wheels and tyres, which have been swapped for more off-road appropriate items), offroadcreations’ buggy alternate includes working independent front and trailing-arm rear suspension, steering, and a V8 engine.

There’s more to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum, including a link to building instructions so you can convert your own 42039 set. Click the link above to make the giant off-roady jump.

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Sir Mix-a-Lot

LEGO’s 2020 Technic line-up includes, for the first time, a cement mixing truck. And it looks rather good too. However it does cheat a bit by having a single purpose-built drum piece.

Not so Kirill Mazurov (aka Desert Eagle / desert752), whose own Kamaz-based concrete truck features a brilliant brick-built rotating drum, which spins either as the truck moves along or via a hand crank mounted on the side, depending on which option is selected.

A host of other mechanical functions feature too, including pendular suspension on the rear two axles, steering on the front two, and a working V8 engine underneath the tilting cab.

Around 2,500 pieces are used in Kirill’s creation, and you can recreate this excellent concrete mixer truck yourself as instructions are available. Head to Eurobricks to find the link along with full build details and a video of the truck’s features, and Flickr for the complete image gallery.

*Today’s title song. Obviously.

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Purple Haze

The Honda Acty is not a fast car. In fact, in second generation 35bhp 550cc form, it is a very slow one. We therefore very much appreciate the mildly deranged mind of someone who decides to turn the 1980s kei van into a dragster. Cue Michael217, who has done just that, equipping his Model Team recreation of the Acty with dragster wheels, a wheelie bar, and a LEGO Buggy Motor – which explains the requirement for the first two items. Plus it’s purple.

There’s more to see of Michael’s brilliant remote control Honda Acty dragster at both Eurobricks and Bricksafe, and you can find today’s awesome title song by clicking here.

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Japan’s First Supercar

This is the Toyota 2000GT, Japan’s first supercar, and surely one of the most beautiful cars ever made. Produced from 1967 to 1970, the 2000GT was developed in collaboration with Yamaha, a relationship the two firms have maintained ever since. Only a few hundred units were built, including two special convertible versions for the James Bond movie ‘You Only Live Twice’, and the car was raced extensively, setting multiple speed and endurance records in the late 1960s.

Toyota 2000GTs command an enormous sum today, but thanks to Matthew Terentev you could still get your hands on one, as his stunning Technic version is currently on LEGO Ideas vying to become an official LEGO set. Matthew has recreated the GT’s incredible bodywork superbly too, with his model every bit as swoopily gorgeous as the real thing. Working steering, the coolest pop-up headlights on a car ever, and a detailed engine and interior also feature, and there’s more to see at Matthew’s ‘Toyota 2000GT’ album on Flickr here, where you can also find a link to vote for it on LEGO Ideas.

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