Tag Archives: Technic

Buy This Pagani Huayra!

We get asked a few particular questions more than any others here at The Lego Car Blog. ‘Will you blog my [insert creation]?’ (no), ‘Can I have instructions?’ (probably not), and ‘Where can I buy this?’.

As we’re here to publicise people’s own builds, there answer is usually ‘sorry, you can’t’. But not today, because you really can buy this one.

This incredible car is a Pagani Huayra, as featured here a few weeks ago. It was designed by Technic-building legend Jeroen Ottens as a gift to another builder, an amazing man by the name of Grum64.

Mr. Grum was involved in a motorcycle accident aged 19 in which he broke his neck, paralysing him from the chest down. Despite having no hand movement Grum builds with LEGO, using his teeth to construct sets over the course of many weeks which is – to all of us here at TLCB – a simply mind-blowing achievement.

Grum decided that rather than accepting Jeroen’s spectacular model for himself, that they would auction it for charity – in particular the amazing charity Fairy Bricks which provides LEGO sets to sick children in hospital and hospices. In fact Fairy Bricks provide around £5,000-worth of LEGO every single month to brighten the lives of children who may feel a very long way from home.

From April 19th Jeroen’s beautiful Pagani Huayra Technic Supercar will listed on the auction site catawiki, where you can bid to own this stunning one-off creation (which features an 8-speed sequential gearbox, all-wheel cantilevered suspension, steering, active aero, a V12 engine, custom chrome and much, much more).

Not only that but Pagani have donated two huge Huayra computer blueprint drawings signed by Horacio Pagani himself to the auction, so the winning bid will receive a piece of hypercar history as well as one of the finest Technic Supercars ever built.

You can read full details of the build (and the story behind it) and Jeroen’s website, and you can see our original post of his superb Pagani Huayra by clicking here.

The Catawiki auction for Fairy Bricks commences on April 19th and remains open until April 24th, with 100% of the proceeds going to the Fairy Bricks Charity.

Click here to visit the auction

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Technic Towing

Huge, ungainly, and a regular picking up truckers. No, it’s not your Mom, but this enormous fully remote controlled Technic Kenworth tow truck by TLCB debutant Anatolich.

With twelve Power Functions motors, a 70cm length plus another 70cm of boom, and a 5kg weight, Anatolich’s Kenworth is one of the largest models of the year so far.

Those motors power a range of functions, with four taking care of the 8×4 drive, a Servo the steering, and the axle lift, outriggers, boom lift, boom extension, two winches and towing fork powered by a motor each.

If that wasn’t enough there’s also a V8 engine, working suspension, and no less than ten openable doors and compartments.

There’s lots more to see of Anatolich’s hugely impressive creation at both Eurobricks and on Flickr. Click on the links above to call for a tow.

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Nice Niva

Lego VAZ Niva

We’ve often mocked Russian vehicles here at The Lego Car Blog, and rightly so – they’re largely crap. However modern Ladas are essentially just Renaults and Dacias, making them now perfectly respectable, if thoroughly boring.

That said we probably wouldn’t trade a modern Renault with a Lada badge on the front for one of their old catastrophes, apart that is, for one car. Launched in 1977 the VAZ (now Lada) Niva was a superbly capable off-roader, more sophisticated than a comparable Land Rover of the era, likely more reliable, and a fair bit cheaper too.

The Niva is still being built today too, and is infinitely better than the monstrosities that the G-Wagon and Range Rover have become. This most excellent Technic version of Russia’s iconic off-roader comes from TLCB favourite Horcik Designs, who has recreated it in Technic form, both with and without Power Functions components.

It’s the remote control version we have pictured above, complete with suspension, all-wheel-drive via an XL Motor, Servo steering, a Li-Po battery, and third-party tyres.

There’s more to see of Horcik’s Technic Niva at both Flickr and Bricksafe – take a look via the links.

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The Tortoise & The Hare

Lego Hot Rod Tortoise

The story of the Tortoise and the Hare is nature’s most famous race, designed to teach kids about… we dunno, perseverance or something? Anyway, the bunny seems to have won in the end, claiming all the chocolatey glory of Easter. Out of the two it’s the tortoise that actually lays eggs though (although eating them is probably illegal), so perhaps it should be the anthropomorphic representation of Easter instead.

We’re not sure where we’re going with this.

It’s nearly Easter, and the two protagonists in the aforementioned race have returned to duke it out once more courtesy of Kale Frost of Flickr, who has certainly upped the stakes by equipping each with a Technic hot rod. Pick your Easter winner via the link above!

Lego Hot Rod Hare

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Knight in Shining Armour

Lego Batman Batpod

We all know Batman only works in black (and sometimes very very dark grey). After the extravagant campness of his appearances in the ’60s this is something of a relief, but if he were to pick a new colour the Dark Knight could do well to take advice from ianying616 of Flickr.

ianying616 has recreated the amazing Batpod from The Dark Knight trilogy and given it an exterior somewhat shinier than the mat-black original. The result is spectacular and there’s more to see of ianying’s all-chrome Batpod at his photostream. Click the link in his name above to see all of the stunning imagery.

Lego Batman Batpod

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Purchase a Pagani

Lego Technic Pagani Huayra

This is a Pagani Huayra, one of the fastest, most aerodynamically clever, exclusive and expensive cars ever to reach production. Unobtainable then, but not this one. This is Jeroen Ottens’ incredible Technic recreation of the Pagani hypercar, and you could own it as the model is due to be auctioned for charity.

With working cantilever suspension, gull-wing doors, steering, an eight-speed sequential gearbox, highly detailed V12 engine, and even the Huayra’s active aerodynamics, Jeroen’s Technic Supercar is one of the most technically advanced yet. Just like the real car.

There are more images to see at Jeroen’s Pagani Huayra Flickr album by clicking here, where you can also find details on the charity action date and a link to the complete build specs.

Lego Technic Pagani Supercar

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BuWizz Train Pull!

Yes you read that right. The guys over at BuWizz, who have designed a rather clever fully LEGO-compatible bluetooth control/battery, have decided to showcase the power of their little brick by a pulling train! With standard LEGO motors (and only three of them!). Don’t believe us? Take a look via the video above!

If you’d like to see how you can use the power of BuWizz yourself (even if you don’t have an old-timey train carriage handy) you can read our review of the BuWizz device by clicking here.

BuWizz

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Front Loaded

Lego Technic Volvo L120H Front Loader

No, not your Mom’s Tinder pictures, but this rather neat Volvo L120H front loader from newcomer Kio Liex. Similar in look to LEGO’s own excellent 42030 Volvo L350F Technic set (which became even more excellent when we fitted it with an SBrick bluetooth brick) but a bit smaller (just like the real L120H), Kio’s model is packed with Power functions goodies.

An XL Motor delivers the drive (also turning a 6-cylinder piston engine), whilst a Medium Motor powers the articulated steering and another the bucket tilt. Lastly a Large Motor raises and lowers the bucket arm with enough power to raise the whole model off the ground.

There’s much more of Kio’s remote controlled Volvo L120H front loader to see at the Eurobricks forum here, where a link to videos can also be found in the discussion thread. Click the link above to check out the complete gallery of images and join the discussion.

Lego Technic Volvo L120H Front Loader

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Mile High Club

Lego Technic Aircraft

Aircraft are not often created in Technic form. Now we’re a car blog so that’s really a problem for us, but it is a shame, as their technical features are perfect for the principles of Technic. A case proved by previous bloggee Lipko, who has constructed this wonderful two seat light aircraft and packed it with ingenious technical functions.

Lego Technic Plane

Lipko’s plane features realistic working ailerons, tail rudder, elevators and flaps, each controllable via the cockpit and/or a Hand of God mechanism. Up front is a flat-4 engine with propellor pitch control, there’s retractable landing gear with a steering front wheel, an opening canopy and engine cover, and a clever ‘manual propeller drive’ that allows the propellor and engine to be spun.

There’s much more to see of Lipko’s excellent aircraft via both Eurobricks and Brickshelf, plus you can watch all those features in action courtesy of the YouTube video below. Take a look and join the Mile High Club via the links in the text above.

YouTube Video

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Whitesnake*

Lego Technic Dodge Viper ACR

America has mixed form when it comes to supercars. The excellent Ford GT is at one end, the Corvette is in the middle, being now pretty good but mostly fairly hopeless, and the Dodge Viper… yeh, that’s still crap.

But that doesn’t mean we wouldn’t want a go in one. Especially this variant, the mad ACR edition. With the Viper’s V10 engine tweaked to 645bhp, carbon ceramic brakes, and a seriously extreme aero package the ACR was… well, still nowhere near as good as anything from Europe or Japan.

That didn’t stop it heading to the Nurburgring with aim of claiming the road legal lap record though. Three attempts ended with a wrecked ACR and no record, but it was the fastest road-legal-American-rear-drive-manual-transmission-car to lap the Nurburgring. Possibly because it was the only one to do it.

No matter, because this fully remote controlled Technic Dodge Viper ACR designed by previous bloggee Lachlan Cameron (aka Lox Lego) and photographed by Jeff McClain is every bit as good as the real car isn’t. Alongside the remote control drive and steering are working suspension, LED lights, a V10 engine underneath a flipping clamshell hood, and opening doors and tailgate.

There’s more to see of Lachlan’s amazing ACR at his Flickr photostream – click the link above to attempt the lap record…

Lego Technic Dodge Viper ACR

*Today’s title song. Don’t pretend you don’t like it.

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The Anti-Hummer

Lego Technic Suzuki Jimny

Some of our least favourite cars are SUVs. The Hummer. The Cadillac Escalade. The Chevrolet Suburban. And, despite its depth of engineering and wonderfully utilitarian roots, the latest Mercedes-Benz G-Wagon can probably be added to the list, seeing as these days it seems to be driven entirely by insufferable douchebags. There is a shining exception though, a leafy oasis in a brash and ostentatious desert that seems to be expanding every year. The utterly wonderful Suzuki Jimny.

Lego Technic Suzuki Jimny

Recently updated for the first time in almost twenty years the new Jimny is an excellent looking thing, far more charming than its predecessor anyway, yet just as brilliant off-road. A 1.5 litre engine drives all four wheels via locking differentials and tiny overhangs make the humble Suzuki a veritable mountain goat when the going gets rough.

Lego Technic Suzuki Jimny

This excellent Technic homage to probably our favourite recent off-roader comes from damianple of Brickshelf, and it’s every bit as marvellous as the real thing. With remote control all-wheel-drive and steering, suspension on all wheels, LED lights, and opening doors and hood we think it would make a most excellent official Technic set. Take a look via the link above and see if you agree, where damianple’s Suzuki Jimny Brickshelf album includes photos on-location off-road plus some neat chassis imagery too.

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[HOONIGAN]

Lego Ford Mustang Gymkhana Ken Block Hoonicorn

Ken Block might be a less-than-successful racing driver, but he makes one hell of YouTube video. DC Shoes owner Block’s ‘Gymkhana’ series has become an internet phenomenon, with views in the hundreds of millions and major corporate backing from the likes of Monster Energy and Ford.

The seventh film in the ‘Gymkhana’ series took the formula to the sheets of Los Angeles, and with it brought a new car into the Gymkhana garage; very probably the wildest first generation Ford Mustang ever built. With twin-turbos, almost 900bhp, and all-wheel-drive, Block’s ‘Hoonicorn’ Mustang is a very different proposition to the lovely but (let’s be honest here), rather comfy cruiser that was the original.

Lego Ford Mustang Gymkhana Ken Block Hoonicorn

The results are as spectacular as you would expect, and have inspired previous bloggee Lachlan Cameron to build his very own Gymkhana 7 ‘Hoonicorn’ Mustang in Lego Technic form.

With accurate decals, wide arches, and wheels from the official 42083 Bugatti Chiron set, Lachlan’s Mustang certainly looks the part, and with a full remote control Technic ‘Supercar’ chassis, including all-wheel-drive, all-wheel-independent suspension, and a beautifully chromed V8 engine (complete with two turbos), it goes the part too.

Lego Ford Mustang Gymkhana Ken Block Hoonicorn

There’s much more to see of Lachlan’s incredible creation at his Ford Mustang Hoonigan album by clicking here, and you can watch the real car tearing up the streets of Los Angeles in ‘Gymkhana  7’ by clicking this link, which will absolutely be the coolest thing you’ll watch all day!

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Mantis

Lego Technic RC Mantis Supercar

The mantis is surely one of Nature’s weirdest creations. Only not terrifying because they’re pretty small, if you saw a picture of one with no concept of scale you’d undoubtedly flee to the hills convinced mankind was about to be enslaved by a superior alien race.

Car makers love naming their vehicles after odd animals though, and the mantis is no exception, being used on Marcos’s early-’70s sports car that looked every bit as horrific as the insect which gave its name.

Fortunately their mid-’90s sequel was – if still not brilliant – far more palatable, but neither were as good to look at as this concept supercar from Flickr’s R. Skittle. Suggested to us by a reader, Skittle’s ‘Koncept Mantis’ is an interesting looking thing, with a full remote control drivetrain hidden under the unusual bodywork.

A pair of Power Functions motors drive the rear wheels whilst another controls the steering, there’s clever pushrod suspension, and an even cleverer automatically deploying airbrake that raises when the car ‘brakes’.

There’s much more to see of R. Skittle’s ‘Mantis’ Technic supercar on Flickr – click here to see the complete gallery and a video of the car in action.

Lego Technic RC Mantis Supercar

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Grindr

Lego Technic Red Alert Grinder Tank

It’s been a while since the last act of outrageous Elven violence here at TLCB Towers, but fear not readers, the little scumbags were back in business today. This is Desert752 aka Kirill Mazurov’s ‘Grinder’* tank from the classic video game Red Alert 3, and it’s nuts.

Controlled via bluetooth thanks to no less than three SBricks, Kirill’s Grinder* features ten Power Functions motors, six alone just for drive. A seventh powers the articulated chassis steering, the eighth the boom lift, and a ninth the huge rotating cutter on the end of it.

But what about the tenth you say? Well the lucky Elf that discovered this remote control monstrosity kept that one secret for a bit.

Driving it through the halls of TLCB Towers, Kirill’s Grinder* was frustratingly slow, certainly much too lethargic for the Elf in question to mow down any of its brethren. The other Elves in the office quickly got cocky, taunting the Elf at the controls by standing in front of the approaching tank with its whirling cutter, before jumping out of the way at the last second to much cackling and – we suspect – Elven profanity.

But that tenth motor had yet to be used, and after lulling its colleagues the Elf in control deployed motor No.10. With the secret high-gear engaged the Grinder’s* speed instantly trebled, and the taunters simply couldn’t get out of the way quickly enough.

Fed under the wheels by the cutter, then squashed by the Grinder’s* huge tyres, before being rolled flat by the tracks that followed thereafter, there has probably never been a worse machine to be run over by than this.

We were quite impressed by the Elf at the controls’ subterfuge too, and it’s now enjoying a blue Smartie whilst we have a go with the Grinder* ourselves.

There’s more to see of Kirill’s remote control behemoth at the Eurobricks discussion forum, the complete Red Alert Grinder* gallery can be viewed on Flickr, and you can watch the machine in action via the video below.

YouTube Video

*No, not that Grindr.

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Flight Risk

Lego Technic Boeing Stearman Kaydet PT-17

From the depths of the ocean to the clouds in the sky now, although the route there may have been a little wobbly. This is a Boeing Stearman Kaydet PT-17, the U.S military’s default training aircraft of the 1930s. Flight was a risky business back then, and even more so with a seventeen-year-old student at the controls. This marvellous Technic recreation of the aeronautical equivalent of a driving school car is the work of Flickr’s Mihai Dreve and it’s been built as part of a competition currently underway at Eurobricks. Click here to find out more, and the link above to view the Kaydet PT-17’s complete album.

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