Tag Archives: Technic

Creamsicle

Porsche and Volkswagen have history as long as the two companies’ existence. A shared dark past links the Beetle and the 911, the 1980s 924 was powered by a VW van engine, and more recently Volkswagen have bought Porsche outright, adding the brand to their ever-increasing and possibly slightly evil empire.

But before ‘dieselgate’, some of the largest fines and lawsuits in corporate history, and an ongoing criminal investigation, Volkswagen and Porsche collaborated to create something rather more charming than breathing difficulties and lung cancer. This is that collaboration, the slightly odd but utterly wonderful VW-Porsche 914/916.

Launched in 1969 the VW-Porsche 914 was produced until 1976, with 120,000 made during that run. A flat-4 engine powered the Volkswagen version, whilst it was joined by an optional flat-6 in the Porsche, giving the two ‘914/4’ and ‘914/6’ names depending upon the engine specified, with power ranging from 75 to 110bhp.

This gorgeous Technic recreation of the Porsche 914 comes from newcomer Wilbert Engels who has built the ’70s oddity beautifully in Lego form. Wilbert’s model includes working suspension, steering with Ackermann geometry, pop-up head-lights, a removable roof, adjustable seats, a gearbox, and a choice of both the flat-4 and flat-6 engines that powered the real cars.

There’s much more to see of Wilbert’s brilliant Porsche 914 at both his Flickr album and at the Eurobricks discussion forum, including a full gallery of images and build specifications.

Take a look via the links in the text above, and cross your fingers that Volkswagen and Porsche can return to making cars like this, rather than an ever expanding range of depressingly identikit SUVs.

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Game of Bricks – Light Kit (42078 Mack Anthem) | Review

The Lego Fan Community is a marvellous thing. Like all the best products, LEGO has the scope – and the adaptability – to allow for improvement, with bluetooth remote control, custom decals, and even bespoke mini-figures available through third party providers to help builders to personalise their own creations and official sets.

One area that LEGO themselves dabble in is LED lights, with a pair available through their Power Functions range. But what if you want more? Like, lots more?

That’s where Game of Bricks come in, a new start-up offering tailored lighting kits for existing LEGO sets. The guys at GoB contacted us to see if we’d like an early test of a one of their kits, and a box for the huge 42078 LEGO Technic Mack Anthem set duly arrived here at TLCB Towers. So how did it fair? Read on to find out!

Packaging & Product

First impressions were excellent, with the Game of Bricks Mack Anthem kit arriving in a secure and rather nice box, with a mass of wires and lights neatly packaged within it. Unpackaging it undoes much of that neatness unfortunately, as a lot of lights means a lot of wires, but more on that in a bit.

The wires themselves are extraordinarily thin, so much so we feared breaking them, but it turns out they’re remarkably robust, and their slim profile allows them to (mostly) fit between bricks without issue. Attached to these are the lights themselves, each glued inside a non-Lego brick that replaces the non-functional light pieces on the model. These non-LEGO replacements are a good match, although their clutch power is slightly variable, and each has a hole drilled through it to allow the ultra-thin wires to pass through.

Power comes from a battery box (or two in the case of our kit) that takes AAA batteries and plugs into the wires via a USB connection. This makes disconnecting the battery boxes to change them an easy process, plus you can plug your lights into a USB port should you wish. So far, so good.

And then we got to the instructions… Continue reading

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Indian Summer

This beautiful motorcycle is a JAWA 350, built by the historic bike company founded in Czechoslovakia in way back in 1929. After the Second World War JAWA became one of the world’s largest motorcycle manufacturers of the time (even inventing the automatic centrifugal clutch that Honda copied for its world-conquering Cub), exporting their bikes to over 120 countries by the 1950s. India was one such country, where JAWA motorcycles quickly gaining a cult following the bike-loving country.

Gradually JAWA’s home markets shrank, but the brand lives on in India where it was bought by Mahindra and continues to produce its classic designs to this day. This gorgeous recreation of the marque’s most famous product comes from Flickr’s _spacehopper_ who has recreated the iconic motorcycle in wonderful detail, mixing both Technic and Model Team techniques to great effect. There’s lots more to see of _spacehopper_’s brilliant model at his JAWA 350 album on Flickr – click the link above to go for a ride.

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Starship Trooper

This is an Isuzu Trooper, a robust, reliable, bland, Japanese 4×4 from the 1990s. But it is a rather good Technic model and it also allows us to tenuously link to a movie trailer where everything blows up, so there’s that.

This neat Technic version of the Trooper comes from Kent Kashiwabara of Flickr, features working steering, suspension, and opening hood, tailgate and doors, and there’s more to see via the link above.

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Bending Bricks

The Elves are happy today. Firstly this huge remote control truck is orange, so it’s already off to a winning start, and secondly it can fit a gaggle of them in the back to ride around the office, and only a few got run over.

This unique machine comes from Waler of Brickshelf, who designed and built it for his engineering diploma thesis. Waler’s design allows his truck to articulate in the middle in two dimensions, both left/right and up/down. To accomplish this Waler’s truck includes a cleverly-constructed pivoting differential, kind of like a helicopter’s swash plate, that can deliver power whichever way the the two halves of the truck are pointing.

The truck is steered by two linear actuators that swing the chassis around a central pivot point which – as it can also pivot vertically – allows for insane articulation. All-wheel-drive, a remotely operable gearbox, all-wheel-suspension, and custom 3D-printed differentials complete the drivetrain, upon which a simple removable body is mounted.

There’s a whole lot more to see, including the clever central pivot design, custom diffs, and on-location photos showing the truck off-road, at Waler’s Brickshelf gallery. Click the link above to make the jump.

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Lamborghini Aventador SV | Picture Special

Following Charbel’s superb Technic McLaren 720S published here earlier in the week we now have Italy’s answer. Or one of them at least, as the country is fortunate enough to b home to a pair of top quality supercar makers. The is the Lamborghini Aventador SV, and it’s been recreated to near perfection by TLCB newcomer mihao/lego_bee.

Suggested by a reader and pictured here digitally (we think?), but built for real, mihao’s Aventador replicates the famous supercar’s aesthetic brilliantly in Technic form. Underneath accurate the 1:12 scale exterior is a complete remote control drivetrain formed by two L Motors driving the rear wheels with a Servo controlling the steering. All four wheels feature independent suspension, the head and tail lights work, and the scissor doors, front trunk and engine cover all open.

mihao/lego_bee’s Lamborghini can be seen in more detail at the Eurobricks forum and you can watch a video of the brick-built creation on YouTube by clicking here. You can also vote for mihao’s design to become an official LEGO set via the LEGO Ideas platform, which we think would make an excellent addition to LEGO’s officially licensed (and mostly brilliant) Technic line-up. Find links to add you vote at Eurobricks and YouTube above.

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Proper PROFA Off-Road

This is a Tatra T813 8×8 PROFA trial truck and it’s epic. Yes, we just dropped the most over-used word on the internet, but we’re sticking with it.

These amazing machines can traverse just about anything, with this one being run by Team Jansa in European Truck Trial events. Well not this one, because this is a fully functional remote control recreation of the real deal, powered by a total of nine motors, two SBricks and with some of the coolest suspension we’ve ever seen.

It comes from Technic-building legend Madoca 1977 whose work has appeared here numerous times over the years. His latest truck evolves a previous design with more power, more weight, and more off-road capability. Six L Motors drive all eight wheels, whilst two Medium Motors pivot the front four. A third Medium Motor operates a high/low range gearbox, with all of that controllable via bluetooth thanks to a pair of SBricks.

Finally there’s a V12 piston engine mounted under the cab, which is accessible through opening doors and front hatch. It’s an incredibly well engineered creation and there’s more to see of Madoca’s Tatra T813 8×8 (including a video of it in action) at the Eurobricks forum and on ReBrickable, where a parts list and yes – instructions – are available!

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Buy a Porsche, Get a Datsun Free

Yup, because if you own the 42056 LEGO Technic Porcshe 911 GT3 RS set you could also own this lovely Datsun 240Z. Just not at the same time.

Builder pleasedontspammebro has created the classic Japanese sports car from the parts only found within the 42056 set, and has made instructions available so you can repurpose your own Porsche too. The Datsun features steering, a straight-6 engine, opening doors and bonnet, a 5-speed gearbox, independent suspension, and wheels that are – coming from the Porsche set – a little too large… but you can fix that.

Head to Flickr for the image above or ReBrickable to see the full specs and to get hold of the instructions.

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McLaren 720S | Picture Special

McLaren are one of the ever expanding list of vehicle manufacturers to partner with LEGO, in probably the best move LEGO has made in, well… ever. From life-size replicas to small scale Speed Champions sets, there’s a LEGO McLaren for everyone. Except for Technic fans.

Eurobricks member Charbel aims to rectify this, with his stunning Technic McLaren 720S. Two years in the making Charbel’s 720S forgoes Power Functions motors in favour of some serious mechanical functionality, including an 8-speed sequential gearbox, independent suspension, a working V8 engine, opening butterfly doors, active rear wing, and working steering.

Charbel’s creation is also adopts a completely modular construction and there’s a whole lot more to see at the Eurobricks forum at the link above, or via Charbel’s beautifully presented video below.

YouTube Video

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Trucking Fast

Racing trucks are, to our eyes, completely pointless. Totally unsuited to motorsport and hampered by regulations that state they still need a fifth-wheel (as if they’re ever going to tow anything!), they’re only really worth watching for the inevitable crashes. But that’s not to say they aren’t impressive, because they are. Hugely so, with upwards of a thousand horsepower.

Equally impressive (maybe) is this, Lucio Switch’s ‘Race Truck MkII’, a spectacularly smooth Technic replica of a European racing truck, complete with some serious power of its own. LEGO’s discontinued buggy motors are the most powerful the company has ever made and Lucio’s creation has two of them. And two BuWizz bluetooth bricks, each multiplying that power by a factor of eight.

A Servo Motors controls the steering, and model also features working suspension front and rear, opening doors, a tilting cab, and an inline six-cylinder piston engine. It’s also, as you can see here, presented beautifully – giving a perfect demonstration of how to photograph and edit a Lego build. There’s much more of Lucio’s brilliant model on Flickr, including images of the chassis and drivetrain, at the Eurobricks forum where there is also a video of the model in action, and at Lucio’s own website.

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They See Me Crawlin’

This is a remote control 4×4 rock crawler and it comes from previous bloggee Technic BOOM. If you’re a regular reader of this dilapidated corner of the ‘net you might now be expecting a tale of mass Elven destruction, corridor smushings, and even a trip to the ‘Elf Hospital‘.

However the clue is in the title with this post, as Technic BOOM’s creation is one of the slowest that we’ve ever encountered. This inevitably enraged the Elf that discovered it, unable as it was to inflict mayhem on its fellow Elves, but it also means that BOOM’s model is ridiculously capable off-road.

With gearing of 9:1, enormous non-LEGO RC tyres, remote control drive, steering, and differential lockers, Technic BOOM’s rock crawler can inch its way over almost anything. Very slowly.

There’s more to see of this superbly engineered machine on both Flickr and at the Eurobricks discussion forum, where you can also watch a video of it doing its thing on-location off-road.

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Squashed in Space

After today’s earlier build we’re back to the usual TLCB nonsense and mayhem with this, a ‘multi-purpose all-terrain vehicle’ built by LXF and found by one of our Elves on Brickshelf. Despite the mini-figure in the cockpit LXF’s model is a Technic one, with a suite of remote control goodies inside too. Each track is powered by a separate LEGO Buggy Motor, whilst the single rear wheel steers via a Medium Motor. Those three motors are hooked up to a third party BuWizz brick, allowing not only Bluetooth control but also delivering eight times the power of LEGO’s own Power Functions battery.

If you’re thinking that sounds like a recipe for Elves getting squashed you would be right, as those caught at ground level stood no chance once this came hooning down the corridor. Thanks BuWizz…

We’ve now got to get some Elves (and their various bodily fluids) out of the carpet, so whilst we do that you can check out all the images of LXF’s mad creation on Brickshelf via the link in the text above.

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Chevrolet Silverado K30 Crew Cab | Picture Special

Here at The Lego Car Blog we’re not usually fans of American pick-up trucks. This is because they are, by and large, complete crap. However – and we appreciate there is little logic to this whatsoever – old American pick-up trucks, even though they’re still complete crap, are somehow becoming rather cool. This is one such ageing pick-up, the Chevrolet Silverado K30, in dually crew cab specification.

Perhaps it’s because as vehicles get older we’re willing to overlook their shortcomings, but we really want this truck. The Elves do too, seeing as it’s a giant tasteless 4×4. Fortunately for one of them, it did get its grubby little claws on this, as it found this rather impressive Technic recreation of the classic(?) Silverado K30 crew cab by previous bloggee filswagood on Flickr.

A few of the other Elves in TLCB Towers soon got to experience it too, but not in the way they hoped, as it ran them down in the corridor. Power Functions remote control drive and steering combined with bouncy suspension enabled filsawgood’s Chevy to comfortably squash a couple of our little workers before we took the controls away to take a look for ourselves.

And look we did, because filsawgood’s Silverado is a brilliantly-engineered build, not only featuring the aforementioned (and excellent) remote control drivetrain, but also opening doors, hood (under which is a detailed engine), tailgate, and toolbox (battery compartment), plus the model includes LED lights and a detailed interior too.

There’s much more of filsawgood’s superb Chevrolet Silverado K30 crew cab to see at his Flickr album by clicking here, and you can check out filsawgood’s other Technic 4x4s to appear here at The Lego Car Blog by clicking this bonus link.

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Black Mirror

We continue yesterday’s chrome theme with, well… even more chrome. This is ianying616‘s ‘Black Onyx’ hot rod, and it’s really very shiny indeed. It’s also two cylinders short of the engine usually fitted to a hot rod, but ianying has made up for this with a delightfully impractical (and enormous) vision-restricting supercharger. Both it and the V6 engine underneath it turn, plus there’s working steering and suspension too. Head over to Flickr for the full gallery.

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The Martian

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing. The world no doubt thought following NASA’s incredible achievement in 1969 that lunar exploration would become routine. As it turned out man last visited the moon just 3 years later, leaving a vast 47 year wait (and still counting) for a return.

Space it seems, is now pretty boring (we suppose it is mostly empty anyway), only utilised in 2019 to enable aubergine emojis to be sent around the world and to allow drivers to completely ignore road signs.

Hollywood however hasn’t forgotten the romanticism of a proper space adventure, and in 2015 ‘The Martian‘ showed us via incredible attention to detail how a manned mission to Mars might look. It even had it’s own star car, the funky and yet very probable-looking Mars Rover.

This is that vehicle, albeit in Technic form, as built by Samolot of Eurobricks. Underneath the movie-realistic exterior Samolot had included an array of clever remote control functionality, all of it powered by LEGO’s own Power Functions motors and controlled via the third-party SBrick bluetooth brick and mobile app.

Each of the rover’s four enormous wheels is powered independently by a separate L Motor which – due to their size – are ingeniously housed inside the wheels themselves. All four wheels steer too, courtesy of a Medium Motor, whilst independent suspension allows the model to traverse the rocky martian landscape.

Finally two more Medium motors power the rover’s winch and rear crane (switchable via a gearbox) and an on-board compressor that feeds air to the crane’s pneumatic cylinders and those that open the cockpit doors.

Samolot’s creation is superbly accurate to the ‘real’ vehicle that starred in the movie and there’s loads more to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, including a video of the model in action. Click the link above to make the trip, and remember that help is only 140 million miles away…

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