Tag Archives: Technic

Sand’s Going to Get Everywhere…

If you think sand gets everywhere at the beach, try driving one of these things. Fifteen minutes in a sand buggy and there’ll be sand in places you didn’t know you had.

This excellent Technic rendition of a skeletally-framed sand-insertion device comes from Dicky Laban of Flickr, and includes front and rear suspension as well as working steering thanks to LEGO’s x136 wishbones and new wheel hub pieces. See more to see via the link.

Advertisements
Tagged , , , ,

Plus Size

LEGO’s new Control+ app has finally brought bluetooth control to LEGO sets. Available on the new 42100 Technic Liebherr R 980 excavator set, the largest set LEGO have ever produced, the Control+ app allows all seven motors to be operated, and programmed, via a mobile device.

But what if the new app was used to control something a bit… larger?

Weighing 890 tons and with around 4,000 bhp the real Liebherr R 9800 excavator is the third largest excavator in the world and it has, courtesy of LEGO and TLCB Master MOCer Sariel, been turned into the world’s largest remote control toy.

With a suite of ingenious motorised Technic mechanisms installed in the cab the real Liebherr R 9800’s controls could be operated remotely through the new LEGO Control+ app, allowing it to drive, steer and excavate via a mobile phone just like the 42100 set. Only on a much much bigger scale.

Take a look a video above to see how the team did it, and get some ideas for how to control your annoying neighbour’s Honda Odessey through your phone…

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Honey, I shrunk the 42100

LEGO’s 42100 Technic Liebherr R 9800 is the largest Technic set ever produced. With over 4,100 pieces, seven electric motors, bluetooth control and a $450 price tag, we’re fairly sure that most MOCs will be quite a lot smaller than LEGO’s latest Goliath. Cyberdyne Systems hasn’t let that stifle his ambition though, building this tiny mechanical version of the mighty 42100 set and equipping it with all* the functionality of its much bigger brother.

The bucket arm can swing, raise and extend mechanically via linear actuators (and much finger twiddling we suspect), whilst the bucket itself can both tilt thanks to a worm gear and open by pulling on a string.

There’s more to see of Cyberdyne’s 42100-in-miniature at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above where you can also find a video of it in action.

*Kinda.

Tagged , , , , , ,

Tanky Picker

This is a Foremost Chieftain R, a high-speed rubber-tracked personnel and cargo carrier, and it looks like a cherry picker and a tank have had one hell of an accident.

This amazing Technic version of Foremost’s bizarre tank-cherry-picker-thingy has been built by Thesuperkoala of Flickr who has packed it with incredible mechanised functionality.

Like the real Chieftain R, Koala’s Technic version features four powered tracks separated front to rear by a central articulated pivot. LEGO’s linear actuators operate the steering of Koala’s model whilst Power Functions motors provide the drive for these and the four tracks.

Mounted upon the rear section of the Chieftain is a large motorised cherry picker crane, with further linear actuators driving the boom raising/lowering and extension. The crane superstructure can also rotate, with four motorised stabilisers ensuring the Chieftain doesn’t tip over whilst it’s, er… picking cherries(?).

Koala’s creation is a hugely impressive build and one well worth a closer look. Head to Thesuperkoala’s Foremost Chieftain R album on Flickr via the link above to view the full gallery of excellent imagery.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Dozing Dozers

‘Twas a night nowhere near Christmas, when all through the house, not a creature was stirring…

Until a remote controlled bulldozer powered through the Elves’ cages. Elven screaming, fleeing and smushing followed, until the jubilant Elf at the controls was apprehended and removed from TLCB Towers. Annoyingly we’ll have to give it a meal for its mischief too.

Until then, let’s take a look at the cause of the ruckus; this superb fully remote controlled Technic bulldozer built by damjan97PL / damianple. With twin XL motors, one powering each track, and a motorised front blade and rear ripper courtesy of two Medium motors, damjan’s ‘dozer is a simple yet very effective machine.

A third-party SBrick allows the model to be operated via Bluetooth and it also includes opening cabin doors and a suspended driver’s seat. There’s much more to see of the RC bulldozer at both the Eurobricks forum (where a video can also be found) and via Brickshelf – click the links to make the jump.

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Pick-Me-Up

After this week’s earlier incident we’re a bit light on Elves at the moment, and thus when another ridiculously capable remote controlled creation was found by one of our smelly little workers we feared another violent event.

Fortunately the creation in question was much too slow to meet out any vengeance (much to the Elf at the controls’ annoyance), but it is no less excellent for that, which has cheered TLCB office immensely.

Built by Attika of Eurobricks it’s entitled ‘Ultimate Pick-Up’, which is a bold claim, but a potentially accurate one.

A raft of Power Functions motors provide all-wheel-drive through planetary hubs, whilst a high/low range gearbox allows Attika’s truck to climb gradients in excess of 50 degrees.

A full compliment of LEDs light the head and tail lamps whilst a third-party SBrick enables all of that to be controlled via Bluetooth, plus there are opening and locking doors, hood and tailgate and adjustable seats.

There’s a whole lot more to see of Attika’s ‘Ultimate Pick-Up’ at the Eurobricks forum, where you can also find photos showing the chassis and driveline construction and a video of the truck in action. Click the link above to take a look.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Mechanical Mehari

Citroen are not known for their off-roaders. Ok, these days all they seem to make are – like every car company – SUVs, but they’re about as good off-road as Kim Kardashian is at plumbing.

However Citroen’s roots are far more off-roady than you might think; one of the 2CV’s key objectives was to cross a field without breaking any eggs.

And that’s where this comes in; the delightful 2CV-based Mehari.

Produced from the late ‘60s the Mehari was designed as a utilitarian two-wheel-drive off-roader (although four-wheel-drive versions followed) for civilian and military use, and – just like the models we have here – it was made out of plastic.

The models we have here come from TLCB favourite Nico71, who has recreated the Mehari beautifully in Technic form.

Nico’s design features steering, a removable roof, opening doors, hood and tailgate, and – most importantly – an accurate recreation of the Mahari’s superb suspension system.

There’s loads more to see of Nico’s wonderful build at his website by clicking here, where full details, an extensive image gallery, and building instructions are all available.

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Extinction Rebellion

What the…?

This TLCB Writer stepped into the office this morning to find a scene from a horror film.

Well, if you’re an Elf at least. For humans it just looked like someone had dealt with a rodent problem via one of those comedy mallets. Squashed Elves were everywhere; on the floor, against the walls, even on top of shoes left in the corridor. But what could cause such total Elven carnage?

The answer was to be found in the office where – lying crashed on its side – a tracked buggy lay dormant.

Marxpek’s Technic recreation of the Howe & Howe Ripsaw EV1 had caught and smushed almost every single Elf on the floor of TLCB Towers, methodically running them down until it finally overturned in the office, whereupon the Elf at the controls had fled into the night.

Powered by eight Buggy Motors and four BuWizz Bluetooth control bricks, we have never featured a creation as powerful as this one. Ever.

A trick suspension and a track tensioning system allow that ludicrous power to be deployed on any surface, making Marxpek’s Ripsaw the most capable off-road Lego creation yet.

The Elf responsible for last night’s mass extinction attempt will be back for a meal token later, giving us some time to patch up the wounded. In the meantime you can check out more about this incredible machine at the Eurobricks forum here, and you can get an idea of how it managed to dispatch so many Elves last night in the video below.

YouTube Video

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

KAMAZ Flatbed

Another day, another Elf returns to TLCB Towers with a find in the hope of getting fed. It has been too, as this Technic KAMAZ 43118 truck is thoroughly excellent. The Elven happiness has extended beyond the discoverer of this creation too, as there are currently several Elves riding around in the back of it.

Built by ArsMan064 (is there a theme with today’s builder names?) this KAMAZ 43118 flatbed includes a remote control drivetrain courtesy of LEGO’s Power Functions motors and a third-party SBrick bluetooth control. An XL motor provides the drive whilst two Medium motors power the steering and the front winch.

ArsMan has also given his model some brilliant suspension, with all six wheels able to articulate over rough ground or any Elf that gets in the way today, as well as opening cab doors and drop-sides for the truck’s flatbed.

There’s loads more to see of ArsMan’s KAMAZ at the Eurobricks forum via the link above, where a complete gallery of images, video of the model in action and a link to building instructions can all be found.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

On Wings of Gold

This a Honda Gold Wing GL 1800, and it has – despite quite clearly being a motorcycle – an engine twice the size and with twice the cylinders of the most popular cars in TLCB’s home nation.

The Gold Wing first arrived in 1974, being aimed squarely at the American touring market. In continuous production since, apart from in 2011 when production moved from the U.S. back to Japan, almost 650,000 Gold Wing motorcycles have been built, with the latest versions such as this GL 1800 featuring cruise control, a stereo, a reverse gear and even an airbag.

This brilliant Technic recreation of Honda’s fattest motorcycle comes from Fanylover of Eurobricks and like the real bike it’s packed with features, including a flat-6 piston engine, front and rear suspension, steering, and a two-speed gearbox.

Build details and more images, including photos of the frame construction, can be found at the Eurobricks forum. Click the link above to go touring.

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Cowdi

We shouldn’t like the Audi RS7. Driven by douchebags and often poorly modified, they’re usually found an inch from the rear bumper of the car in front wearing stupid blacked-out lights and a blackboard wrap. But, as Audi RS models go, the RS7 is actually quite subtle. OK, not subtle, but it’s not the bloody SQ7 and for that it should be celebrated.

This Technic example wearing RS7-appropriate mods has been built by terryli of Eurobricks and comes wrapped in a cow-esque paint job with chrome-red rims. Whilst not exactly to our tastes (although the Elves love it…), terryli’s RS7 is superbly accurate underneath, with the Audi’s swooping outline very well replicated in Technic form.

There’s a lot going under under that cowhide too, as the model is equipped with remote control drive and steering, LED lights, opening doors, hood and tailgate, independent and remotely adjustable suspension, and a brilliant motorised deployable rear spoiler.

There’s more to see of terryli’s Cowdi RS7 at the Eurobricks forum – click the link above to take a closer look.

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

Blow Me

Mixing Technic, Model Team, and a little bit of spray paint, this gorgeous Bentley 4.5 litre ‘Blower’ was found by one of our Elves on Eurobricks today. Built by newcomer BC Lego it includes working ‘worm gear’ steering, an opening bonnet under which lives a brick-built replica of the 4-cylinder supercharged engine, and one of the most detailed chassis we’ve seen in some time. See more at the Eurobricks forum via the link above where you can find a link to the full gallery and build details.

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

LEGO Technic 42100 Liebherr R 9800 Excavator | Set Preview

There’s been one hole remaining in our reveal of the H2 2019 LEGO Technic line-up. It turns out it was a very big hole indeed. This is the 42100 Liebherr R 9800 Excavator, the largest and most expensive Technic model ever released.

With over 4,100 pieces, seven electric motors, and two of LEGO’s new ‘Smart Hubs’ which allow for remote control via Bluetooth thanks to the recently released LEGO Control+ App, the 42100 set is the most advanced Technic set yet, and it has a price tag to match, costing $450/£400.

That is seriously expensive for a toy, but LEGO are hoping that the set’s enormous array of programmable functionality will make it an attractive purchase. The officially-licensed Liebherr (joining such sets as the Volvo L350F, Mack Anthem and Claas Xerion 5000) can drive, skid-steer, rotate the superstructure, extend and raise the boom, and open and tilt the bucket, all remotely via a phone.

Those functions can be programmed too, thanks to the new Control+ App, with realistic sound effects and real-time feedback available. It’s a modern interpretation of the brilliant plug-and-play 8479 Barcode Truck from twenty-two years ago, only with the up-to-date control programmability afforded by today’s intuitive touch devices.

The new LEGO Technic 42100 Liebherr R 9800 Excavator set will reach stores in October of this year, instantly becoming the flagship of the Technic range. Will the intuitive control, easy programmability and amazing multiple motorised functions offset that huge price? We’re willing to bet that if it does then a $500+ Technic set isn’t too far away…

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Get Fork-D

The LEGO Technic 42082 Rough Terrain Crane has the highest piece count of any Technic model so far (although check back here later to see what’s about to eclipse it…) including multiple motors, linear actuators and gearbox parts, making it the perfect set for repurposing into something new. LEGO offer this themselves via the ‘B-Models’ that can be built from most Technic sets, and TLCB Master MOCer Nico71 has gone two steps further by designing both ‘C’ and ‘D’ Models from the parts found within the 42082 inventory.

Nico’s 42082 ‘C-Model’ appeared here last year and he’s now designed a further ‘D-Model’ that can be built solely from the parts found within the Rough Terrain Crane set.

Nico’s heavy duty forklift includes as many functions as the set from which its parts are taken, including a motorised tilting and raising/lowering fork, powered adjustable fork width, a tilting cabin, V6 piston engine, pendular suspension and working steering.

It’s a brilliant build, made even more so by the parts restriction inherent with being built from an existing set, and you can see full details, the complete gallery of images, and find building instructions at Nico71’s website by clicking here.

YouTube Video

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Cable Container

The TLCB Elves are excited today. Not only is this find bright orange, it’s also remote control and large enough for a several to ride in it at once whilst being too slow to run them over.

It comes from designer-han who has a doctorate in advanced mechanical engineering. OK, we don’t know that for sure, but we assume he does because his latest creation is so complicated it makes our brains hurt.

An SBrick provides bluetooth control to the drive and four-wheel-steering, plus a motorised tilting cabin (under which sits a V8 piston engine), twin cable winches, a tilting container platform, and front and rear power-take-offs onto which a snowplow and salt-spreader can be attached.

There’s more to see of designer-han’s orange masterpiece at Eurobricks via the link above where a link to the full image gallery, building instructions and a video can be found.

Tagged , , , , , , ,
Advertisements
Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: