Tag Archives: rally car

Sliding Citroen

Lego Remote Control Citroen DS3 WRC

Dogs on hardwood floors. The masters of indoor drifting. Until now.

This angry-looking creation is a Citroen DS3 World Rally Car, as driven by nine time World Champion Sébastien Loeb, who has now switched to the World Rallycross series.

Underneath the shopping-car-on-steroids bodywork would normally be a trick all-wheel-drive system powered by a monster turbo engine. However builder Anto has taken a different route…

Lego Remote Control Citroen DS3 WRC

Driving the rear wheels only are two Large Power Functions motors, whilst a servo takes care of the steering. The steering has a clever caster angle built in, meaning that when it’s turned the stiff chassis unloads a rear wheel. In principle this means Anto’s Citroen could drift, if only LEGO motors had a bit more power…

With the addition of a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery brick however, they do. A lot more. The BuWizz system delivers up to eight times more power than normal to the LEGO motors, and that is easily enough to spin the rear wheels on a not just a hardwood floor, but pretty much anything.

There’s more to see of Anto’s drifting DS3 WRC on Eurobricks, where there are also instructions available so you can build it yourself, and you can watch what the car can do courtesy of the brilliant video below…

YouTube Video:

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Supermarket Special Stage

Lego Technic Rally Car

The World Rally Championship has a long association with humble hatchbacks. This is probably because of the sport’s grass-roots origins, when cars really were just road-going shopping appliances, and where the tightness of the rural European roads on which the stages were held favoured the small and nimble.

These days the WRC is used primarily as an advertising tool for mass-market products. If a car can deal with a Swedish forest, it’ll probably be alright in the supermarket carpark. The current crop of works WRC cars include the Ford Fiesta, Skoda Fabia, Hyundai i20, Citroen C3, and Toyota Yaris, and they are becoming increasingly (and gloriously) nuts.

Lego Technic Rally Car

Previous bloggee Horcik Designs has decided to construct his very own WRC contender to join in the fun, and it’s a beautifully packaged bit of kit. A three-cylinder piston engine is mounted transversely under the hood, delivering the power to the independently-sprung wheels via a four-speed gearbox. Working steering, opening doors, hood and trunk, and a roll cage all feature too, and the body panels can be easily removed to reveal the internal construction.

A full gallery of images is available at Horcik’s Flickr photostream – click the link above to the make the jump.

Lego Technic Rally Car

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Three Wheels on My Wagon

Gene 3S’s 1966 Mini Cooper S has run into a problem on its way to Monte Carlo. Fortunately the car is well equipped with tools and a spare wheel on the roof. There are some nice details on this conventional, studs up car, plus the neat simply styled scene. The car is based on an actual Mk.1 Cooper S, LBL 6 D. The car is currently up for sale and you can see loads of photos by following this link, which is a great resource for building your own Mini Cooper or modifying LEGO’s official 10242 set.

Sadly Gene 3S’s model was TWOKed by a team of TLCB Elves just after the spare wheel was put on.  Apparently they were muttering something about stealing a gold shipment

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Plan B

Lego Peugeot 205 Turbo 16

We rarely feature digital creations here at TLCB. Today though we’re going to break our own rule, because this virtual Peugeot 205 Turbo 16 Group B rally car is an absolute delight.

Built in the mid-1980s to race in the World Rally Championship, Peugeot’s monster mid-engined all-wheel-drive 205s won the final two Group B World Championships in ’85 and ’86, before the formula was banned.

This wonderful recreation of one of the most fearsome WRC cars ever is the work of newcomer Fabrice Larcheveque, who has replicated Peugeot Sport’s famous 1980s livery brilliantly in digital form, and has absolutely nailed the car that wears it too.

Fabrice has built several other iconic cars in LEGO’s Speed Champions style and you can see more of these, plus the Peugeot 205 Turbo 16 featured here, via MOCpages, plus you can also vote for the Peugeot to become the next officially-licensed car in the Speed Champions range via LEGO Ideas.

Lego Peugeot 205 Turbo 16

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High Five

Lego Renault 5 Turbo Group B

Renault are finally on a bit of a roll at the moment, after years of making rubbish. Back in the ’80s they were on a bit of a roll too, and this was the highlight, the mad Renault 5 Turbo Group B rally car. This one’s been built by Jonathan Elliott of Flickr and you can see more at his photostream here.

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Deadliest Delta

Lego Lancia Delta S4

This is a Lancia Delta S4, and even by 1980s Group B WRC standards it’s a terrifically ugly thing. Ugly, but astonishingly effective. With all-wheel-drive powered by a mid-mounted 1.8 litre engine with both turbo and super charging (the first ever example of twin-charging), the space-framed and composite-shelled Delta S4 could produce as much as 500bhp.

If that sounds like a dangerous combination you’d be right, and tragically Henri Toivonen and his co-driver were incinerated when their S4 left the road in 1986. Group B was immediately banned, and with it the maddest of all the World Rally Cars ended its motorsport career.

Senator Chinchilla hasn’t forgotten the Italian monster though, and has ensured the Delta S4 lives on in Lego form with his exquisite Model Team replica. See more on Flickr.

Lego Lancia Delta S4

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Plan B

Lego Technic Group B Rally Car

Back in the mid-’80s world rally cars were a very different animal to those racing today. With only the loosest affiliation to their road-going counterparts, the racers of Group B took rallying (and then rally-cross, after they were banned from the WRC in 1987) to a whole new level or speed, and – unsurprisingly – risk. Formula 1 had mostly cleaned up its safety record by the mid-’80s, however Group B rallying ensured that professional motorsport continued to send people home in boxes.

A series of fatalities in 1986 prompted the FIA to act, and it was to be Group B’s last WRC season. The cars were not forgotten though, with many transferring to rally-cross, whilst Peugeot updated their monstrous 205 T16 to run in the Paris-Dakar rally, winning in ’87. ’89 and ’90.

Previous bloggee and Technic legend Nico71 hasn’t forgotten either, paying homage to the insanity of Group B with his latest creation, this superb Technic Group B rally car. Based on no particular model Nico’s model looks a bit like an Opel Astra to us (if Opel has created a Group B challenger), and it’s packed with mechanical Technic functions. These include a mid-mounted V6 engine, all-wheel-drive with three differentials, working steering both by the wheel and Hand-of-God, opening doors and rear engine bodywork, and fully independent suspension on all wheels.

As the time of writing Nico’s latest build isn’t on Brickshelf or the other main creation-sharing websites (big points for the Elf that found it!), but you can see all the details, a huge gallery of high quality images, and access instructions to build this model yourself at Nico’s own website. Click the link above to head to a forest in 1985.

Lego Technic Group B WRC Nico71

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Lancia Stratos – Picture Special

Lego Lancia Stratos

We like the Lancia Stratos very much here at TLCB. Styled by Bertone, powered by Ferrari, and winner of three back-to-back World Rally Championship titles, few cars can match the pedigree of Lancia’s incredible 1970s sports car.

Lego Technic Lancia Stratos Rally Car

The two gorgeous models shown here both come from James Tillson, and they’re amongst our very favourite creations of the year so far. Underneath the wonderfully replicated bodywork is a full mechanical Technic Supercar chassis, featuring all-wheel independent suspension, working steering, opening doors and front and rear clamshells, a transversely-mounted V6 engine, a working 4-speed gearbox and pop-up headlights. There’s also some absolutely beautiful decal-work giving the models fantastic period authenticity.

Lego Technic Lancia Stratos

There’s lots more to see of both the Alitalia and +1 Racing Stratoses at the Eurobricks discussion forum and via James’ Flickr photostream – making the trip to view the Lancias’ full gallery is recommended hugely! We’ll see you there…

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Turbeot

Lego Peugeot 205 Turbo 16

TLCB has a long-standing apathy for Peugeot, but it hasn’t always made unreliable, ugly euroboxes. Back in the 1980s Peugeot made some seriously cool cars, and this is one of their highlights; the insane Group B Peugeot 205 Turbo 16.

Flickr’s _zux_ has recreated one of the finest cars of the ’80s in both WRC and Pikes Peak specification, each with all-wheel-drive, steering, suspension, and the mighty mid-mounted four-cylinder turbocharged engine. There’s lots more to see on Flickr – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Technic Peugeot 205 Turbo Group B

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Ice Cool

Lego Lancia Stratos

Lancia may be a shadow of its former self reduced to making ugly Chrysler knock-offs, but there was a time when owning a Lancia was seriously cool. The legendary Stratos was one of the brand’s highlights, winning the World Rally Championship three times and remaining a rally winner until the mid 1980s, a full decade after its launch. This neat remote control Lego ice-racing version comes from Flickr’s Peter Blackert and was suggested to us by a reader – see more at the link above.

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All Four

Lego Audi S1 Quattro Rally Car

A modern Audi might just be an overpriced Skoda driven by a sunglasses-wearing, tail-gating douchebag, but there was a time when to drive an Audi was the understated choice.

All that changed in the 1980s though, when the Ingolstadt firm decided to pair a revolutionary all-wheel-drive system with a brilliant turbocharged five-cylinder engine. Audi weren’t actually the first manufacturer to insert all-wheel-drive into a production performance car (that title goes to Jensen and their fantastic FF), but they were the first to do it for the masses(ish).

Audi entered their new car into the World Rally Championship’s recently formed ‘Group B’ category, winning two world championships and rendering all two-wheel-drive competitors obsolete overnight. No car without all-wheel-drive has ever won the championship since.

The Technic replica of that championship-winning Audi S1 quattro pictured here comes from Eurobricks’ dokludi, and it’s as brutally ugly as the real thing. It’s accurate on the inside too, with working steering, all-wheel-drive, gearbox, inline five-cylinder engine, suspension and a full roll cage.

You can see all the images and read full details of the build at the Eurobricks discussion forum – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Technic Audi Quattro

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Wild Horse

Lego Ferrari 308 Rally Car

Cars wearing the prancing horse badge are usually found only on the smoothest of tarmac. Or stored un-driven in an investor’s garage, which is even worse. TLCB regular Angka Utama isn’t having any of that though, as his Ferrari 308 has been built for the gravel and mud of the forests. We like this approach very much.

You can see more of Angka’s Ferrari 308 rally car on either MOCpages or Flickr, and if you think an off-road Ferrari is about as realistic as Kim Kardashian winning the nobel prize for physics, take a look at the links below…

A Ferrari 288 GTO getting muddy, a Ferrari Enzo getting muddier, and a Ferrari Mondial banger racer!

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A Tiny Turbo

Lego Renault 5 Turbo

Nope, not an annoyingly generic 4-wide Lego creation, but Renault’s remarkable early ’80s R5 Turbo.

Downsized turbocharged engines are all the rage now, but Renault had the formula nailed more than thirty years ago. The little R5 was powered by a dinky 1.4 litre motor, one that in rally-tune kicked out over 200BHP. America couldn’t get that much power from a V8 four times the size

The downside of all that power from such a small engine was chronic fragility, and the road-going R5 Turbo quickly gained a reputation for not working a lot of the time – which meant that it nicely set the tone for the next three decades of French automotive production.

However, unreliable though it was, the R5 Turbo is still regarded as one of the greatest motoring achievements of the 1980s, winning four WRC events and pioneering turbo-charging for the masses.

This brilliantly-built Model Team recreation of the 1982 Tour de Corsa winning rally R5 Turbo comes from MOCpages’ REGIS Michel, with Power Functions remote control drive, working lights, and some of the nicest decal-work* we’ve blogged. There’s more to see at his MOCpage via the link above.

*This particularly excited our Elves for some reason.

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Delta Force

Lego Lancia Delta HF Integrale

Lancia might be almost dead now, reduced to making Chrysler knock-offs (but uglier) for the domestic Italian market, but the company was once one of the most advanced car manufacturers in the world.

The Lancia back-catalogue is amongst the most impressive of any car maker, which makes their current situation even sadder. So rather than dwelling on the present we’re going to take a trip back to one of Lancia’s greatest hits, the incredible Delta HF Intergrale.

Based on the humble Delta hatchback, the HF Intergrale became one of the most formidable rally cars of all time, and because the rules of the time stated that WRC cars must have a road-going equivalent it meant that a lucky few were able to buy their very own version of the championship-winning rally car.

It’s the production-version that Daniel Helms has chosen to build in Lego form, and a brilliant job he’s done too. His recreation of the Italian icon was suggested to us by a reader and you can see the full gallery of his Delta HF Integrale on MOCpages by clicking the link above.

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Dirty Datsun

Lego Technic Datsun 1600

Lego is designed to be used. Chewed. Dropped down the stairs. And, in this case, rally-driven through autumnal woods. VKTechnic is the builder, the 1970 Safari Rally winning Datsun 1600 is the car, and Power Functions motors are the propulsion. See more of Lego being used as it should be on Flickr or Brickshelf.

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