Tag Archives: Turbo

Rally to the Maxi

Lego Renault 5 Maxi Turbo

It’s the early 1980s, and everything has gone ‘Turbo’. Sunglasses, deodorant, razors… all of them could be found in ‘Turbo’ form, thanks to cars such as this one; the nuts Renault 5 Maxi Turbo.

Based on Renualt’s road-going hot hatch, the Maxi Turbo made almost 350bhp from its tiny 1.4 litre engine in rally form, enough to win the Monte Carlo Rally in its first outing in the World Rally Championship in 1981.

Ultimately the Renault 5 Maxi Turbo was quickly surpassed by the arrival of all-wheel-drive machines from Audi, Lancia and Peugeot, but it had left its mark, and a good road-going 5 Turbo is a sought-after car today.

This Speed Champions recreation of the Maxi Turbo comes from Fabrice Larcheveque who has recreated the car rather neatly in 6-wide form. Resplendent in an authentic livery courtesy of custom decals (and a bit of paint) there’s more to see of Fabrice’s 5 on both MOCpages and Flickr. Click the links to don your Turbo sunglasses and take a look.

Lego Renault 5 Maxi Turbo

Advertisements
Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Brabham BMW BT50

Lego Brabham BMW BT50

This is a Brabham BMW BT50 and it was – frankly – a bit shit. Powered by a tiny four-cylinder 1.5 litre turbo the BT50 was hugely forward thinking for 1982, but also catastrophically unreliable. The Bernie Ecclestone owned team retired cars from 17 out of 22 race starts in 1982, although the car did prove fast when it worked, securing a race win at Canada.

Not one of Formula 1’s greats then, but nevertheless a car that pioneered the technology that almost all top-flight racing cars use today. This superb recreation of the Brabham BT50 comes from previous bloggee Greg 998, and it includes working steering, suspension, a well-replicated BMW Motorsport engine and a wealth of rather lovely decals. There’s more to see of the build at Greg’s Flickr album or via MOCpages – click the links to make the jump.

Lego Brabham BMW BT50

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Teutonic Turbo

Lego Porsche 911 Turbo

Certain cars are synonymous with the technology with which they popularised. Early on in the SUV’s meteoric rise they were all called Jeeps, whether or not they were made by the Jeep Company, and until recently all vans in the UK were known as Transits, regardless of their actual model name.

And then there’s ‘Turbo’. Back in the ’80s everything was a turbo. Turbo bags, turbo aftershave, turbo sunglasses. Turbo became a synonym for ‘fast’, and everyone wanted to cash in. There was however one car that defined the turbo era. The Porsche 911 Turbo.

Produced from 1975, first with a turbocharged 3.0 air-cooled flat-6 and then a 3.3, the Porsche 930 series was indeed simply badged as ‘Turbo’ in some markets. It was also terrifying. With up to 330bhp on offer – all of which would arrive some considerable time after the driver pressed the accelerator peddle – 930s became the second largest killer of stockbrokers after cocaine.

We’ll stick with this one then, which looks far easier to pilot than the real thing. Built by previous bloggee Dornbi, who’s better known for his superb Lego aircraft, this brilliant Model Team mid-’80s Porsche 911 930-series perfectly captures the real Turbo. It’s even in 1980s white! There’s much more to see at Dornbi’s photostream – take a look via the link above. Just be careful with the throttle.

Lego Porsche 911 Turbo

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Forced Induction

Lego Renault RS10 Formula 1 Car RoscoPC

This is a 1979 Renault RS10, and it was the first turbocharged car to ever win a Formula 1 race. It’s been faithfully recreated in Lego form by Master MOCer Luca Rusconi aka RoscoPC, whose recently re-uploaded creations have featured heavily here over the past few months. This is Luca’s first entirely new build, allowing him to take advantage of LEGO’s latest parts to brilliant effect.

Powered by a tiny 1.5 litre twin-turbocharged V6 engine the Renault RS10 produced over 500bhp… when it worked. Which to be honest it didn’t all that much, but when it did the RS10 was phenomenally fast. Renault’s single 1979 win with the new turbo engine forced every other front-running F1 team to hastily begin turbo engine development, and if it weren’t for F1’s constantly changing (and pointless) restrictions banning turbocharged engines by the late-’80s (when they were producing as much as 1,400bhp), we doubt any naturally-aspirated engine would have won an F1 championship again. Of course those same pointless restrictions now mandate the use of 1.6 litre turbocharged V6 engines, so the sport has come full circle…

Lego Renault RS10 Formula 1 Car RoscoPC

Renault never won a Formula 1 Championship with the technology they pioneered though (although they did earn some excellent results), but the RS10 can be credited with completely changing the landscape of F1, ushering in the wonderful insanity of the ’80s turbo-era until forced induction was outlawed in 1989.

There’s more to see of this stunning recreation of one of Formula 1’s most game-changing cars at RoscoPC’s Renault RS10 Flickr album – click the link to make some boost.

Lego Renault RS10

Tagged , , , , , , , , ,

High Five

Lego Renault 5 Turbo Group B

Renault are finally on a bit of a roll at the moment, after years of making rubbish. Back in the ’80s they were on a bit of a roll too, and this was the highlight, the mad Renault 5 Turbo Group B rally car. This one’s been built by Jonathan Elliott of Flickr and you can see more at his photostream here.

Tagged , , , , , ,

Technic Turbo

Lego Technic Porsche 911 Turbo

If there’s one car that sums up the wide-boy 1980s best, it could well be this – the Porsche 911 Turbo. We must confess we’re not really fans of the 930-series 911 Turbo. Compared to the elegance of Porsche’s earlier models the 930 was a bit brash, and – to be honest – a bit crap too. When a car with, er… let’s be polite and say ‘interesting’ handling, has 130bhp – as the original 911 did – then it’s not too much of an issue. Give that car over 300bhp, which also arrives suddenly a few seconds after you’ve pressed the throttle, and people die. Which they did.

Anyway, whilst the 1980s 911 Turbo was not a very good Porsche, it has been turned into a very good Technic model. This one is the work of Blaž Dlopst aka blaz62, making his TLCB debut, and it has working steering, suspension, a 4-speed gearbox, and the famously lethal flat-6 piston engine slung way out the back.

There’s lots more to see of Blaz’s 911 Turbo at his Flickr photostream, Brickshelf gallery, or via the Eurobricks discussion forum, where it has – like many of the recently featured Porsches here at TLCB – been built for the latest LEGO ReBrick competition.

As a result of the current competition our Elves are finding lots of Porsches worth blogging (this one meant an orange Smartie reward, and they’re the best kind), so if you’re not a fan of Porcshe – sorry! However if you do like Porsches there are lots to see! – You can view all of those featured by using the Search bar at the foot of every page, or by clicking on the ‘Porsche’ tag under this post.

Lego Technic Porsche 911 Turbo

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Group C Finale

Lego Nissan R92CP Racing Car

In the 1980s the World Rally Championship was at its most spectacular. Space-framed, wildly unstable and sometimes downright dangerous all-wheel-drive monsters raced through the world’s forests and deserts as part of the lethal Group B experimental class. Not to be outdone World Endurance Racing mirrored the WRC’s turbo-charged excess with its own ludicrous Group C class, where cars like this incredible Nissan R92CP produced over 1,200bhp in qualifying specification.

Like WRC’s Group B, the Group C endurance class was axed after a few short years, but the cars it created have lived on much longer in racing legend. Previous bloggee Greg998 has an impressive catalogue of historic racing cars and his latest is one of the final Group C greats. His stunning 1992 Nissan R92CP is available to view on MOCpages, Eurobricks or Flickr.

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Turbeot

Lego Peugeot 205 Turbo 16

TLCB has a long-standing apathy for Peugeot, but it hasn’t always made unreliable, ugly euroboxes. Back in the 1980s Peugeot made some seriously cool cars, and this is one of their highlights; the insane Group B Peugeot 205 Turbo 16.

Flickr’s _zux_ has recreated one of the finest cars of the ’80s in both WRC and Pikes Peak specification, each with all-wheel-drive, steering, suspension, and the mighty mid-mounted four-cylinder turbocharged engine. There’s lots more to see on Flickr – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Technic Peugeot 205 Turbo Group B

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

A Tiny Turbo

Lego Renault 5 Turbo

Nope, not an annoyingly generic 4-wide Lego creation, but Renault’s remarkable early ’80s R5 Turbo.

Downsized turbocharged engines are all the rage now, but Renault had the formula nailed more than thirty years ago. The little R5 was powered by a dinky 1.4 litre motor, one that in rally-tune kicked out over 200BHP. America couldn’t get that much power from a V8 four times the size

The downside of all that power from such a small engine was chronic fragility, and the road-going R5 Turbo quickly gained a reputation for not working a lot of the time – which meant that it nicely set the tone for the next three decades of French automotive production.

However, unreliable though it was, the R5 Turbo is still regarded as one of the greatest motoring achievements of the 1980s, winning four WRC events and pioneering turbo-charging for the masses.

This brilliantly-built Model Team recreation of the 1982 Tour de Corsa winning rally R5 Turbo comes from MOCpages’ REGIS Michel, with Power Functions remote control drive, working lights, and some of the nicest decal-work* we’ve blogged. There’s more to see at his MOCpage via the link above.

*This particularly excited our Elves for some reason.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

For Your Eyes Only

Lego Lotus Esprit James Bond 007

The James Bond movie franchise is back to its very best at the moment, being dark, slightly brutal and a bit lonely. Which is exactly as it should be.

In the late ’70s to early ’80s though, the movies were an altogether different proposition, and had become almost a parody of themselves. The one bright spot in this ’70s ridiculousness was Bond’s car; the glorious Lotus Esprit Turbo.

There’s no way the British secret service would have ever selected Lotus as a provider of government vehicles of course, seeing as Bond would have spent more time fixing his Esprit than going anywhere in it, but it made for a very cool movie car. Especially when it was fitted with a few nautical modifications from Q-Branch.

This lovely mini-figure recreation of the iconic ’80s sports car complete with 007 himself comes from TLCB regular ER0L and you can join him on a secret mission on Flickr by clicking the link above.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Downsizing

Lego Technic New Ford GT Ecoboost

America. Bigger is better. Guns, meals (and waistlines) and – of course – cars. But what if there’s another way?

It was actually America, remarkably, that put the first turbo-charged production car on the market, way back in the 1960s. Turbo-charging was then promptly forgotten about, and the U.S auto makers went back to their tried and tested method of humungous and spectacularly inefficient V8s.

But the world has moved on, and with European and Japanese manufacturers making huge power from small capacity forced-induction engines, and saving weight, fuel and cost too, it’s finally time for America to get with the programme.

All of the Big Three are now championing turbo-power, using technology from their European divisions to bring smaller-capacity engines to the U.S market. Arguably the most successful so far have been Ford, with their excellent Ecoboost engine range. Unfortunately though, there are still customers in America who live in 1974, and they don’t trust this brave new direction one bit, so how does Ford prove to them that smaller equals better? A 600+bhp Ecoboost supercar ought to do it…

Only a handful of people even within Ford knew that the 2017 GT was being developed, so it came as a total surprise to the motoring press when the GT was revealed in concept form at the 2015 Detroit Auto Show. Powered by the 3.5 litre Ecoboost V6 that Ford would like to see replace the V8 across the range, the GT’s engine is around half the size of its American competitors. And it’s twice as good.

MOCpages’ Rage Hobbit thought so too, and he’s built a stunning Technic replica of the Ford GT before the real car has even gone on sale. Rage’s Lego recreation includes the mid-mounted V6 – hooked up to an eight speed remotely operated gearbox, remote controlled drive and steering, a motorised rear wing, double wishbone independent suspension and opening butterfly doors.

There are more images and full details of the build available at Rage Hobbit’s MOCpages account – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Technic Ford GT Ecoboost V6

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Godzilla’s Grandad

Lego Nissan Skyline 2000 GT-R

Nissan’s current GT-R (previously called the ‘Skyline’) is a seriously impressive supercar killer. But we don’t particularly desire it. We’d like to have a go, sure – but to own… it’s just a bit… dull.

Not so the original Skyline 2000, which we want so much that it hurts. Even more so if it’s like this one. Davanchi M has retro-fitted his gorgeous retro Skyline with an RB26DET twin-turbo straight-six engine from a late ’90s Skyline GT-R, meaning it would go as good as it looks. Which is to say, very well indeed.

Davanchi has uploaded a full gallery of images to both MOCpages and Flickr – click the links to spool up your turbos.

Lego Nissan Skyline GT-R 2000

Tagged , , , , , , ,

Turbo Triple

Lego Technic Super Car

Turbocharged three-cylinder engines are all the rage at the moment, thanks to tightening emissions regulations, high fuel prices, and the advancement of forced induction technology. Ford, Volkswagen, Peugeot, BMW and many more have recently downsized by a cylinder, but it was the Japanese who first explored the idea of a small capacity turbo triple as early as the 1980s.

TLCB regular Horcik Designs has paid homage to the forced-induction pioneers with his generic small Japanese coupe. There’s a three-cylinder turbocharged engine mounted transversely up front, independent and live-axle suspension, working steering, opening and locking doors, and lots more besides. You can see all of Horcik’s photos on Flickr – click the link above to make some boost.

Tagged , , , ,

Twin Turbocharged Toyota T-Top

Lego Toyota MR2 Turbo

We have a well documented love of things with racing stripes here at TLCB. We also like turbos. Big ones that go ‘fushififish’ off-throttle. This creation is therefore ticking all of our boxes as it has not one, not two, but three racing stripes, as well as a pair of turbochargers.

Rhys Pieces is the builder, and you can see more of his excellent heavily-modified mark 1 Toyota MR2 on both MOCpages and Flickr. Fushififish!

Lego Toyota MR2 T-Ba

Tagged , , , , , ,

Blow Me

Lego Polonez Turbo

We’re not fans of Eastern Europe’s communist automotive efforts. Like, at all. But if there’s proof that forced induction, wide arches, and racing stripes can make anything cool, this is it. Raphael Granas‘ ’80s Polonez twin turbo is one of the coolest Lego cars we’ve ever seen. Click above and get ready to want it.

Tagged , , , ,
Advertisements
Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: