Tag Archives: Honda

On Wings of Gold

This a Honda Gold Wing GL 1800, and it has – despite quite clearly being a motorcycle – an engine twice the size and with twice the cylinders of the most popular cars in TLCB’s home nation.

The Gold Wing first arrived in 1974, being aimed squarely at the American touring market. In continuous production since, apart from in 2011 when production moved from the U.S. back to Japan, almost 650,000 Gold Wing motorcycles have been built, with the latest versions such as this GL 1800 featuring cruise control, a stereo, a reverse gear and even an airbag.

This brilliant Technic recreation of Honda’s fattest motorcycle comes from Fanylover of Eurobricks and like the real bike it’s packed with features, including a flat-6 piston engine, front and rear suspension, steering, and a two-speed gearbox.

Build details and more images, including photos of the frame construction, can be found at the Eurobricks forum. Click the link above to go touring.

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Bolt from the Blue

Those of you with good memories will known that Simon Przepiorka‘s excellent slighlty-larger-than-Speed-Champions-scale Honda S2000 has appeared at The Lego Car Blog before. Back in March Simon’s model featured here sporting an Amuse bodykit, about which we wrote “Whether you like that addition or not will be a matter of taste (TLCB Elves and TLCB staff differ somewhat here…)”.

Simon has now updated his AP1 S2000 for those of us who aren’t TLCB Elves (or aged seven), by removing the aforementioned bodykit, lightly modifying the fenders, and fitting a great looking black hardtop.

As before Simon’s Honda includes opening doors and an opening hood, under which sits an easily removable F20C engine, famous for its bolt-activated high-lift cam system and 9000rpm redline. He’s also made instructions available should you wish to build your own version of his design and you can find the link to them, plus see all of the superb imagery, at Simon’s Flickr photostream. Click the link above to take a closer look.

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Rocket Bunnied NSX

When tuning companies take their hammers to supercars they usually get it very wrong (see here, here and here, and try not to be sick), but there is one exception; Rocket Bunny. Founded in Japan by Tops Racing Arts Kyoto, Rocket Bunny kits are produced in a humble little workshop, with careful attention to detail and a few of very ordinary cars parked outside – the very opposite of the flashy (and hideous) European tuners above. The results have become world-renowned, and there are few tuning brands cooler than Rocket Bunny anywhere right now.

This brilliant Lego recreation of a Rocket Bunnied Honda NSX comes from TLCB regular Simon Przepiorka, who has not only captured the brand’s signature look to near perfection, he’s made instructions available so that you can too. Head to Simon’s photostream via the link above for the full gallery and to find the all-important instructions link.

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Civ-sick Type R

Honda’s Civic Type R was never a particularly good looking car, but it was fine as hot hatches go we suppose. The latest FK8 version though, is surely one of the most hideous vehicles ever to reach production. Looking like a cross between a badly modified tuner and a child’s drawing, the current Type R makes us want to projectile vomit immediately upon sighting it*. Which is a shame, because it’s a superbly engineered machine underneath the revolting exterior.

Capturing the current FK8 generation Civic’s look in Lego form is therefore an incredibly difficult task. Firstly because it means looking at images of the real car, and no-one* wants to do that, and secondly because recreating its stupid, fussy, ridiculous exterior in brick-form is surely an impossible feat. Not so for TLCB regular Simon Przepiorka though, who not only steeled himself to look at pictures of the real Honda, he’s managed to turn them into an outstanding approximation of the car in Lego.

A wealth of properly clever building techniques have been deployed to recreate the Civic FK8’s shape in Lego form, including more diagonally clipped-on pieces than we think we’ve ever seen at this scale. Head to Simon’s photostream via the link above to take a closer look at how he’s done it – it’s gotta be better than looking at the real thing…

*Except TLCB Elves who, of course, absolutely love it. Which is all the more reason for any sane person to find it a visually offensive abomination.

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Party Like it’s 1990

Few cars of the 1990s had as much impact as this one. Honda’s NSX shocked the world upon its launch at the start of the decade. A mid-engined supercar from the makers of the Civic, priced at just over half that of a comparable Ferrari 348. Sure it made ‘only’ 270bhp – a figure beaten by a Hyundai i30 these days – but it weighed little, being the first mass-produced car with all-aluminium bodywork, and the V8-powered Ferrari only had 30bhp more.

Honda continued building the NSX right up until 2005, although only around 18,000 were made in that entire production run. Today the NSX is worth substantially more than the Ferrari it undercut at the time, making it, and many other Japanese icons from the ’90s, properly profitable investments.

Fortunately for those of us who can’t afford the real thing serial bloggee Simon Przepiorka has a brick-built solution in the form of this superb small-scale Lego recreation. Simon has captured the NSX’s aesthetics brilliantly, and there’s even a detailed interior and engine behind the opening doors and engine cover.

There’s more to see of Simon’s fantastic Honda NSX at his photostream – click the link above to make the jump to when Honda were at the very top of their game…

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Honda S2000 | Picture Special

Honda’s S2000, built from 1999 to 2009 during the company’s peak, was a gloriously unhinged machine. Its 2-litre engine made an astonishing 240bhp without turbocharging, and it took Ferrari to finally beat the S2000’s highest-output-per-litre record for a naturally aspirated engine with the 458 Italia, a full decade after the S2000’s launch.

Honda achieved this engineering witchcraft through the most Japanese of approaches; revs. The S2000’s F20C engine could rev to 9000rpm, with VTEC only engaging well above 6000rpm. It engaged with a bit go a bang too, and as the S2000’s handling wasn’t quite up to Porsche levels it meant that more than a few cars ended up travelling backwards through hedges.

This wonderful Technic recreation of Honda’s legendary sports car comes from previous bloggee and TLCB Master MOCer Nico71, who has done an incredible job replicating the AP2 series S2000 inside and out.

Not only does Nico’s model look the part (helped by 3D-printed wheels and a few well chosen custom stickers), it’s packed with technical detail too, including working steering, accurate double-wishbone suspension, a replica F20C 4-cylinder engine driven by the rear wheels, opening doors, hood and trunk, and a working convertible roof.

There’s lots more of Nico’s superb Technic Honda S2000 AP2 to see on Brickshelf or at his website by clicking here, including the complete image gallery, full build details and yes – instructions! Click the link above to feel VTEC kick-in yo!

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Honda Civbrick Type R

Life-Size LEGO vehicles have been popping up all over the place of late. From a Bugatti that really drives to a McLaren Senna you can sit in, Chevrolet pick-ups to Volkswagen Campers, and even the humble Toyota Camry, every manufacturer seems to want to see their car built in Lego form.

Honda Australia are the latest to give it a go, courtesy of LEGO Professional and previous bloggee Ryan McNaught and his team of nine master builders.

320,000 bricks and 1,300 hours later and Honda’s Civic Type R has been perfectly recreated in LEGO bricks, from the badge on the bonnet to the wild floating rear wing, with even the wheels constructed from standard LEGO pieces.

Ryan’s Honda Civic was commissioned to coincide with the launch of the ‘LEGO Masters’ TV series airing later this month, in which teams of builders will compete in various construction challenges in the hope of winning $100,000, and where Ryan is one of the show’s judges.

The life-size Civic will go on tour around Australia over the coming months, and if you’re a little too far from Aus  to see the model in person (basically from anywhere that isn’t Australia) click these words to watch a short video of the car courtesy of Honda Australia.

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Amusing S2000

Lego Honda S2000 Amuse

Honda’s late-’90s to late-’00s S2000 was a riotously amusing car. With a 9000rpm redline and the most powerful naturally-aspirated engine by capacity in the world, it even spawned its own meme.

This excellent small-scale recreation of the Honda S2000 comes from serial bloggee Simon Przepiorka, who has fitted his version with a full Amuse bodykit. Whether you like that addition or not will be a matter of taste (TLCB Elves and TLCB staff differ somewhat here…) but either way it’s a brilliant build. See more on Flickr at the link above.

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VTEC Just Kicked In Yo!

Lego Honda S2000

A visit to a car video on YouTube is becoming a perilous affair. The comments are increasingly full of ‘fanboi’s, fanatically raving about cars they’ve probably never even sat in whilst proclaiming all others are vastly inferior.* Few cars seem to suffer from this affliction more than this one, the amazing Honda S2000.

Launched in 1999 Honda took the lightweight roadster formula re-started a decade earlier by Mazda’s MX-5 and, well… Hondarised it. Honda were at the top of their game in the late 1990s and the 2litre, 240bhp, 9000rpm naturally aspirated engine they fitted to their new sports car was an absolute triumph.

The numbers from the engine were astonishing, which – frankly – the rest of the car wasn’t quite able to match (as anyone who experienced VTEC kicking in half way round a wet roundabout found out…), but nevertheless the S2000 became a cult car overnight, a status which – partly thanks to the aforementioned YouTube commenters – shows no signs of abating.

However despite this revelry the Honda S2000 remains an unusual car to be built in Lego form. In fact a delve into the murky archives here at TLCB Towers suggests it has only ever appeared here once before. Previous bloggee Simon Przepiorka, who’s making a name for himself here at TLCB with his brilliant slightly-larger-than-Speed-Champions sports cars, today doubles our S2000 count with this excellent recreation of the first generation ‘AP1’.

Not only does it look fantastic accurate inside and out, Simon’s model includes an opening bonnet under which lies a realistic ‘F20C’ engine, a superb interior, and posable ‘steered’ wheels too. There’s a whole lot more to see of Simon’s superb Honda S2000 AP1 on Flickr – Click the link above to feel VTEC kick in yo!

Lego Honda S2000

*Although said comments will likely surmise this in far less syllables.

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Deeper Purple

Lego Toyota Celica TA22

The purple theme continues here at TLCB with this, Simon Przepiorka‘s wonderful Speed Champions style modified ’77 Toyota Celica TA22.

Simon’s creation is based on a real modified Celica running a Honda F22C engine, and he’s captured the car brilliantly in Lego form. Head over to Flickr via the link above to check out all the pics and find a link to the real car.

Lego Toyota Celica TA22

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The Other Hybrid

Lego Technic Honda CRV

Toyota may be the flag bearer for Hybrids in TLCB’s home market (in fact, they sell more ‘alternatively fuelled’ vehicles than all the other manufacturers put together), but Honda were right alongside them in the earliest days of Hybrid power when they launched in Insight way back in 1999, just two years after the first Prius.

Since then Toyota have gone on to massive Hybrid success with no less than seven Hybrid models available, however Honda now don’t sell a single Hybrid in our home nation at all. So what went wrong? Part of the blame lies with this car; the brilliant-looking CRZ.

With cutting-edge Japanese looks, forward-thinking Hybrid power (with a manual transmission too), and following the legacy left by the funky CRX, the CRZ should have been a success. Unfortunately 135bhp, a high list price, and underwhelming fuel economy (at least compared to European cars) meant the CRZ – along with the second generation Insight – bombed.

Honda ceased selling both models in Europe after just a few years, leaving a product range of just three cars – something the brand is only just recovering from now.

Perhaps what they should have built is this. Lachlan Cameron (aka Lox Lego) has recreated the CRZ’s razor-sharp looks in his Technic CRZ brilliantly, and he’s given the chassis a bit more bite than Honda managed too; Lachlan’s model adds a second electric motor giving his CRZ all-wheel-drive, which sure would’ve pepped-up the real car. There’s also remote control steering, electrically opening doors, torsion beam suspension, LED lights front and rear, a four-cylinder piston engine, and bluetooth control via SBrick.

The result is a superb Technic supercar that’s well worth a closer look, which you can do via both Flickr and the Eurobricks forum. We suspect the real Honda CRZ may one day be worth a closer look too, as we anticipate it becoming something of a cult car in time. Ironically – considering its failure – if the CRZ were relaunched today it’d probably do rather well…

Lego Technic Honda CRV

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Brick-Built-Bikes

Lego Motorbikes

The Elves are grumpy today. Grumpy because this find is one of yours, suggested via the Feedback page, and thus none of them are getting fed. Still, don’t let that put you off, if you have a suggestion check out our Submission Guidelines and if you think it passes drop us a note.

These two excellent brick-built bikes come from Lennart C of Flickr, who has used all manner of ingenious connections to build what is probably the hardest vehicle-type to create in small scale. On the left is superb and fiendishly complicated looking Harley Davidson Seventy-Two whilst on the right is beautifully sleek Honda CBR 1000 RR. See more of each via the links in the text.

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Honda NSX – Picture Special

Lego Technic Honda NSX

After over a decade out of the supercar game Honda’s new NSX supercar has just gone on sale, a near-600bhp hybrid-powered torque-vectoring computer with wheels. But that’s not the one we have here today.

Launched in 1990 the original Honda NSX was designed to take on the established supercars from manufacturers such as Ferrari, only at a lower price point, and to upset the supercar order through the virtue of it, well, being a supercar that actually worked.

Honda F1 driver Ayrton Senna helped to tune the handling in the final stages of development, and although the NSX was powered by ‘only’ a transversely mounted naturally aspirated 3.0 V6 making 270bhp (albeit with an 8,000rpm redline), it quickly gained a reputation for being one hell of a drivers’ car.

Lego Technic Honda NSX

Lightweight (the NSX was the first mass produced car to be made from aluminium) and beautifully nimble, Honda showed that you didn’t need all-wheel-drive, turbos, or a prancing horse on the hood to build a superb supercar. And unlike pretty much every other supercar at the time the NSX was reliable, because above all else, it was a Honda.

These days something of the original NSX’s simplicity is missing from the latest crop of overpowered, over-assisted supercars – the new NSX included, and arguably the same is true for their Technic equivalents. Packed with Power Functions electric motors, remote control, and bluetooth, we seem to have lost the joy of hands-on mechanics. Luckily for us though, Nico71 has not only recreated one of the finest old-school supercars ever made, he’s done it in a profoundly old-school way too…

Lego Technic Honda NSX

This is Nico’s Technic Honda NSX, and it’s as delightfully manual as the real car. An accurate transversely mounted V6 engine is turned by the rear wheels, which are independently suspended along with those at the front. The front wheels also steer by hand, thanks to a connected steering wheel plus a ‘hand-of-God’ connection mounted on the roof. The pop-up headlights are also manually raised and lowered via lever mounted on the dashboard, and the seats can slide fore and aft manually too. Lastly the doors, hood, rear window, engine cover and glovebox all open by hand, and there isn’t a Power Functions motor in sight.

Nico’s Honda NSX is – much like the real car – a triumph of mechanical engineering, and well worth a closer look. Check out the full details at Nico’s discussion topic at the Eurobricks forum, and you can find all the images, a video of the model’s features and instructions (yes, really, so we we won’t be getting the usual ‘Can I have instructions?’ messages for once!) at Nico’s own excellent website – Click here to take a look.

Lego Technic Honda NSX

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R is for Revenge

Lego Technic RC Hatchback Type R

With the Elven bodily fluids and most of the bigger body parts cleared away from today’s earlier situation, we were hoping for a quieter remainder to the afternoon. No such luck. Screeching down the corridor came this, one of the fastest remote control Technic vehicles we’ve seen in some time, entitled the ‘Hatchback Type R’, and made by the same bloody builder that caused the earlier incident. Thanks Madoca.

Ergh, we’ll get back to the story above in a bit, but for now, the model; Built by Madoca 1977 (again) it’s a generic hot hatchback (although no prizes for guessing the inspiration behind it) powered by a single L Motor, steered by a Servo, controlled via a third party SBrick, and featuring LED lights too.

That lone drive motor may not seem enough to create one of the quickest models we’ve seen in a while, but Madoca’s Type R is fantastically light, and the Elf guilty of today’s earlier smushing was still eating the rewards of its find when – launched from the other end of the corridor – the Type R shot towards it and slammed it against the wall.

The Elf at the controls, thirst for revenge satisfied, escaped into the street outside, and will no doubt claim its meal token later in the day. It’s unlikely that it was actually a victim of the earlier assault, but ‘revenge’ amongst Elves is a communal thing and it may have been holding a grudge against a totally different Elf from months ago. Either way, we have more clearing up to do, so whilst we get the mop back out you can see more of Madoca’s Type R, as well as his earlier Toyota Tacoma pick-up truck, by visiting the Eurobricks discussion for both models here.

YouTube Video:

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Civic Duty

Lego Technic Honda Civic EG

Ah, the humble Honda Civic. Built in TLCB’s home nation, and once – even if not any more – the byword for advanced yet reliable hatchbackery.

The Civic has since been overtaken by the Korean brands here in Europe, but early examples are still a reasonably regular sight on the roads due to their legendary reliability. It’s an even more common sight on the banger track, as early Civics are worth about £5 and they can take a serious amount of punishment before heading to the great carpark in the sky.

America is where the Honda Civic was really successful though, where – despite it being basically the same car as the one we have in Europe – the little Japanese hatch has trodden a very different path in the annuls of automotive history.

Today early Stateside Civics seem to all have one thing in common; modifications. Bad modifications. Here at TLCB we’re not really sure why this is, seeing as gas, cars, and insurance are so cheap in the ‘States why not just buy a faster car in the first place?

Lego Honda Civic

The upshot of this is that finding an original unmodified early Civic is like trying to find an educated climate change denier – it’s virtually impossible. Which is a shame, as the late ’80s and early ’90s Civics were great little cars when left as Honda intended.

If you’re reading this in America and have a hankering for an unmolested slice of early ’90s Honda pie, get on Craigslist, find 78 year old Mavis who’s recently given up driving, and buy her Civic. It’ll be a classic one day. Probably.

Alternatively though, you could build your own, which is exactly what TLCB regular Nico71 has done. Based on the ’90s fifth generation (EG) Civic hatch, Nico’s creation is gloriously simple looking. It’s not simple inside though, as a full RC Power Functions drivetrain and rear suspension system have been squeezed in.

It’s quite a feat of packaging and handily Nico has taken photos that show how it’s all been done. You can see all of the images of Nico’s little Technic Honda, inside and out, via Brickshelf – click the link above to make the jump to ’91.

Lego Technic RC Honda Civic

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