Tag Archives: 1980s

Sign-Written Steyr

Lego STEYR 26s37 Truck

Steyr trucks are relatively unknown in TLCB’s home nation, but the huge Austrian manufacturing conglomerate built them from the mid-1960s, and made all sorts of things as far back as the mid-1860s.

The business has since been split up and is today owned by a variety of different companies making an assortment of different products, however back when it was one entity it dominated the Austrian truck market with vehicles such as this one, the 26s37 6×2 truck.

This brilliant recreation of said hauler comes from previous bloggee Arian Janssens, and not only has he recreated the 26s37 beautifully, and added a curtain-sided trailer, he’s absolutely nailed the intricate ‘Nabek’ logos donating the company that ran it.

There’s much more to see of Arian’s superb brick-built lettering and the truck on which it’s written at his photostream. Click the link above to make the jump.

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The Road Warrior

Lego Mad Max V8 Interceptor

It’s been a while since the last Mad Max post here at TLCB, but today one of the Elves returned a hero and our smelly little workers are all now crowded around the old TV/VHS combo in their cage room watching Mel Gibson smash stuff up.

We have previous bloggee crash_cramer of Flickr to thank for the relative peace this has brought, and his huge 1:10 recreation of the V8 Interceptor from 1981’s Mad Max II – The Road Warrior.

Underneath the superbly accurate exterior is a working V8 (with supercharger), functioning steering and live axle suspension, courtesy of some custom curved lift-arms.

There’s more to see of crash-cramer’s epic build at his photostream, and if you’d like your own Mad Max Interceptor (albeit rather smaller) then check out the excellent custom kit from Manner-Spielzeug here.

Lego Mad Max V8 Interceptor

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Big Fish, Little Fish, Cardboard Box

Lego DAF FAs 2500 Truck

A staple dancemove in this writer’s repertoire, you can now do ‘Big Fish, Little Fish, Cardboard Box’ in Lego form! Well, it’s more ‘One Box, Two Box, No Box at All’, but close enough.

This unusual truck is a DAF FAS 2500 in ‘DHS Houtmotcentrale Rijen BJ-08-DT’ specification. Of course we know exactly what that means, we’re just choosing not to explain it here.

Lego DAF FAs 2500 Truck

Moving on… previous bloggee Arian Janssens of Flickr is the builder behind it and, as we’ve become accustomed to, his attention to detail and eye for realism are second to none.

There’s much more to see of his superb DAF FAS 2500 DHS Houtmotcentrale Rijen BJ-08-DT on Flickr via the link above, and if you’d like to learn ‘Big Fish, Little Fish, Cardboard Box’ so you can dance as well as this writer, here’s an excellent instructional video courtesy of Bob the Builder.

Lego DAF FAs 2500 Truck

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’80s Truckin’

Lego DAF, Mercedes-Benz Truck

We jump back to the 1980s now with two trucks that were everywhere in Europe back then. The DAF FT95 and Mercedes-Benz 1632 could be found on every highway in Western Europe, usually pulling anonymous curtain-sided box trailers full of anonymous things.

These two top quality Model Team versions by Flickr’s Arian Janssens are pulling more unusual loads though, as each has a huge three-axle steered dropside trailer in tow complete with an on-board crane.

Each is a wonderfully detailed model with a bunch of working functions thrown in too. Head over to Arian’s photostream via the link above to see the image shown here in full size, and to find the complete galleries and build details of each model.

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Hippies Need Not Apply

Lego Volkswagen Autosleeper Camper

We’re back with a car (sort of), and one that’s been grossly overlooked by both the Lego and automotive communities. This is a Volkswagen T25/T3 ‘Autosleeper’, basically the 1980s version of VW’s Transporter camper.

Thanks to being a bit square and not breaking down all the time, the T25/T3 Transporter has just a fraction of the following of its T2 predecessor, despite being better in every way and even featuring water-cooled engines so you could hear yourself think on the highway.

This means that hippies aren’t interested in them and thus T25/T3s are far more affordable than their older brethren. Even more affordable still is this neat 5-wide Lego version by Flickr’s 1saac W, who has recreated the Autosleeper in late-’80s square-headlight configuration (the least cool of them all).

There’s more to see of 1saac’s excellent 5-wide Volkswagen T25/T3 camper at his photostream, within which there’ll be no tie-die, smelly bong-water, or smelly hippies to be found anywhere! Take a look via the link above.

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Side Strakes

Lego Technic Ferrari Testa Rossa

Some cars are remembered for having one defining feature. The Austin Allegro’s square steering wheel for example, or the Tyrrell P34‘s extra wheels, the ’63 Corvette Stingray‘s amazing rear windows, or even the FSO Polonez‘s universal crapness.

The mid-’80s to mid-’90s Ferrari Testarossa was another such car, and you can probably guess what its defining feature was from these images.

Jeroen Ottens has built the Testarossa’s unique side strakes – along with the rest of the car – as a commissioned piece, and an incredible job he’s done too. Those amazing strakes are built from stacked Ninjago blades, capturing the Testarossa’s stand-out design feature brilliantly.

The beauty of Jeroen’s build isn’t just on the outside either, as underneath the superbly replicated body is a flat-12 engine, 5+R gearbox, all-wheel independent suspension, working steering with Ackermann geometry, pop-up headlights, adjustable seats, and opening doors, hood and engine cover.

There’s much more to see of Jeroen’s stunning Technic Ferrari Testarossa supercar on both Flickr and Eurobricks – click the links to see all the images and to read Jeroen’s details on the build.

Lego Technic Ferrari Testa Rossa

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Rally to the Maxi

Lego Renault 5 Maxi Turbo

It’s the early 1980s, and everything has gone ‘Turbo’. Sunglasses, deodorant, razors… all of them could be found in ‘Turbo’ form, thanks to cars such as this one; the nuts Renault 5 Maxi Turbo.

Based on Renualt’s road-going hot hatch, the Maxi Turbo made almost 350bhp from its tiny 1.4 litre engine in rally form, enough to win the Monte Carlo Rally in its first outing in the World Rally Championship in 1981.

Ultimately the Renault 5 Maxi Turbo was quickly surpassed by the arrival of all-wheel-drive machines from Audi, Lancia and Peugeot, but it had left its mark, and a good road-going 5 Turbo is a sought-after car today.

This Speed Champions recreation of the Maxi Turbo comes from Fabrice Larcheveque who has recreated the car rather neatly in 6-wide form. Resplendent in an authentic livery courtesy of custom decals (and a bit of paint) there’s more to see of Fabrice’s 5 on both MOCpages and Flickr. Click the links to don your Turbo sunglasses and take a look.

Lego Renault 5 Maxi Turbo

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2,733

Lego Porsche 911

Jonathan Elliott’s brilliant Porsche 911 design has appeared here before, but a shot showing it in three variants – including a gorgeous new Singer-esque commissioned piece – was too good to pass up! Plus today’s title gives us a tenuous link to this. See more on Flickr by clicking here.

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Fuji ’88

Lego Porsche 962

The All Japan Sports Prototype Championship (JSPC) was one of the world’s wilder race series. Running from the early ’80s to the early ’90s it pitched various classes of endurance racers against one another on Japan’s fastest circuits. Porsche dominated the series, winning seven of the eleven Championships, with Nissan, Toyota and BMW taking the remaining four.

The Porsche 962 proved the car to beat, and yesterday’s Guest Blogger Prototyp has built three of the 962s that raced in the 1988 Fuji race. Each features the livery from a different team running the Porsche 962 in the late ’80s and there’s more to see of all three versions at Prototyp’s Porsche 962 Flickr album by clicking here.

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Wings (Part II)

Lego Audi Sport quattro S1 E2 Pikes Peak

Unlike today’s other wingsy post, the aero attached to this amazing-looking Audi quattro S1 E2 Pikes Peak is entirely functional. Built for conquering the formidable Pikes Peak mountain climb back when the surface was loose gravel, the Audi quattro S1 E2 needed as much downforce as it could get. Piloted by WRC legend Walter Röhrl, the S1 E2 reached the top of the mountain in less than eleven minutes, making it the first car ever to do so.

This wonderful replica of one of the most ridiculous racing cars ever built comes from Marc ‘Edge’ R.unde of Flickr, and he’s captured both the remarkable bodywork of the S1 E2 and the famous Audi Sport livery beautifully. See more at the link above.

Lego Audi Sport quattro S1 E2 Pikes Peak

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What’s in a Name?

Lego Mitsubishi Shogun Pajero

This is the Mitsubishi Pajero. Or not, depending on where you live. Mitsubishi’s toughest 4×4 was originally named after the pampas cat (Leopardus Pajeros), but the word means something entirely different in many Spanish-speaking countries…

TLCB Towers are not situated in a Spanish-speaking country, but nevertheless the big 4×4 is called something different here too. The Shogun, as it’s known in our market, was one of the founders of the modern SUV craze, but has long since been left behind by more car-like rivals. In fact we can’t remember the last time we saw a new-ish Shogun on the road.

We do still occasionally see early ones though, as they keep going forever. This lovely 6-wide mini-figure scale model of a late ’80s Shogun comes from previous bloggee Pixel Fox, adding to his already impressive line-up of Lego 4x4s. Take a look via the link above.

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Race on Sunday Sell on Monday

Lego Audi Sport quattro S1 E2

Contrary to popular belief Audi were not the first to bring all-wheel-drive to performance cars. However their ‘quattro’ system undoubtedly brought all-wheel-drive performance into the mainstream, and it changed rallying forever.

Launched in 1980 the Audi quattro brought several innovative new technologies into one glorious package, including all-wheel-drive, turbocharging, and a delightfully weird inline 5-cylinder engine. Audi entered their new car in the World Rally Championship’s Group B category, winning the championship in 1982 and 1984, plus the Pike’s Peak Hillclimb too.

By 1985 a variety of all-wheel-drive turbocharged rivals had caught – and then overtaken – the rally pioneer, beating Audi at their own game. This led Audi Sport to chop a chunk of length from the quattro’s wheelbase and up power to a very unofficial 500bhp+. The Sport quattro was born, a comedically ugly machine that was devastating effective. Best of all due to the FIA’s homologation rules a few hundred Sport quattros had to be produced for the road, meaning you could buy your very own World Rally Car for trips to Walmart.

Suggested by a reader we have both the rally and road versions of the Sport quattro in today’s post, each brilliantly built in Speed Champions scale by previous bloggee Marc ‘Edge’. There’s more to see of Marc’s rally and road Sport quattros on Flickr – click the links above to head to a gravelly forest circa-1985.

Lego Audi Sport quattro

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Deutschland Duel

Lego Technic Großer Mercedes 770

Iiiin the red corner, representing West Germany, driven by Adolf Hitler, Heinrich Himmler, Hermann Göring and Pope Pius XI, and powered through the 1930s by eight cylinders and a supercharger, it’s the Großer Mercedes 770!

Aaaand in the beige corner, representing East Germany, driven by peasants, and powered through the 1950s… and 60s… and 70s… and 80s… and 90s… by two cylinders and hope, it’s the Trabant Combi!

Two very different yet very German cars today, represented by two very different but very excellent Lego creations.

Above we have the Großer Mercedes 770, built by Aleh of Eurobricks in Technic form and absolutely packed with amazing technology. Aleh’s recreation of one of Mercedes-Benz’s most opulent vehicles includes Power Functions drive and steering, an inline-8 engine hooked up to a three-speed+R gearbox, working all-wheel mechanical brakes powered by a Medium motor, all-wheel suspension, LED lights, and SBrick bluetooth control.

At the other end of the automotive scale we have this wonderfully replicated Model Team style Trabant Combi, resplendent in an authentic hearing-aid beige and built by fellow TLCB debutant Dan Falussy. With opening doors, hood and hatchback plus folding seats, Dan’s homage to the world’s finest cotton car (yes really) is about as well equipped as the real thing, and very probably better built.

There’s more to see of each model on Eurobricks (as well as Flickr in the Trabant’s case) via the links above. Take a look and choose your winner!

Lego Trabant

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Optimism

Lego Suzuki Super Carry

The most optimistically named vehicle since the Mitsubishi Carisma, the Suzuki Super Carry could not carry many things. Unless they were really small. But that meant it could get into really small spaces. Not as small as this one can though.

Built by TLCB regular Senator Chinchilla this miniature recreation of a miniature van can be neatly parked on your desk. Complete with working steering, an opening rear hatch and – for really big loads, like pencil sharpeners and erasers – a clever sliding side door too. See what you can fit in via the link above.

Lego Suzuki Super Carry

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Thermidor Part II

Lego Scania 142 PWT Thermo

Dennis Glaasker (aka BricksonWheels) is a firm favourite here at The Lego Car Blog with his beautifully detailed Model Team trucks. This is his latest, an awesome Scania 142 in PWT Thermo livery.

Built to partner a previous PWT Thermo truck featured here last year, Dennis’ Scania 142 is constructed from over 4,300 bricks and includes Power Functions drive and steering, SBrick bluetooth control, and an in-built RC battery pack.

It’s a top quality build and you can see more at Dennis’ photostream via the link above, plus you can read our interview with the builder to discover how he creates models such as this one by visiting TLCB’s Master MOCers series by clicking here.

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