Tag Archives: Trailer

Green Light*

This astonishing creation is a Peterbilt 389 quint-axle dump truck, and it comes from Master MOCer Dennis Glaasker aka BricksonWheels after four months of painstaking work.

That work included custom chroming hundreds of parts, the recreation of the Cummins X15 engine, MAC dump body and Hendrickson pusher axles, and the fitment of 120 Brickstuff LEDs.

Those LEDs make the truck look even more special at night, and you can see the complete image gallery including nighttime shots at Dennis’ ‘Peterbilt 389 (1:13)‘ album on Flickr. Click the second link in the text above to make the jump, and the first to read how Dennis creates spectacular models like this.

*Today’s title song.

Hungarocamion Budapest

This superb RABA 2800/3300 truck, effectively a re-badged DAF, comes from previous bloggee Arian Janssens, who says these were common sights on European roads in the 1980s. Recreated in beautiful detail, Arian has constructed a RABA 2800/3300 complete with a ‘curtain side’ load area and an additional drawbar trailer, for hauling even more Hungarian exports. There’s lots more to see at Arian’s ‘RABA’ album on Flickr; take a look via the link above.

My Other Truck’s a Scania

It’s time for another B-Model here at The Lego Car Blog, and we rather like these (as evidenced in Lock-Down B-Model Competition that ran here earlier in the year). B-Models are exactly what LEGO is all about, using pieces in an infinite number of ways to create Something New.

This Something New comes from mpj of Eurobricks, who has repurposed the parts from the 42098 Technic Car Transporter set to create this brilliant Scania Next Generation truck and flatbed trailer.

Looking (we think) better than the set on which it’s derived, mpj’s alternate includes a working V8 engine underneath the tilting cab, ‘Hand of God’ steering, opening doors, and a working fifth wheel that controls the trailer’s two steering axles.

It’s an excellent showcase for how you can build more than what’s on the box, and you can recreate this Scania yourself as mpj has made building instructions available. Head to Eurobricks via the link above for full details!

Yellow Brick Road

This is a DAF FT CF 480 Space Cab with a 4-axle Floor trailer and mobile crane. A suitably long title for a suitably long vehicle. Designed to carry bricks and stone, which makes us very pleased with this post’s title (and it enables us to post this link!*), it comes from previous bloggee Arian Janssens and there’s more to see on Flickr. Click here to follow the Yellow Brick Road!

*We’re not sorry.

Talking Crap

Some commenters have written in to tell us that we are – basically – manure spreaders here at TLCB. Which is true, although they do seem to only state this when we highlight Russia or America‘s shortcomings. We’re pretty sure the rest of the time we spout just as much crap too…

Anyhoo, this post is for them, being an actual manure spreader! It’s a Bunning Lowlander 105 Mk4 to be precise, as built (brilliantly) by Michal Skorupka (aka Eric Trax).

Impressive as the poo-thrower is though, we’re sure most of you are more interested in what’s pulling it, which is a fully remote controlled Case 1455 XL tractor complete with four Power Functions motors.

Drive comes from an L Motor, a Servo controls the steering, and two further M Motors power both the rear PTO (that here is used to spin the Bunning Lowlander’s muck-spreading shafts and conveyor belt) and the tractor’s three-point hitch mechanism.

The model features beautiful attention to detail too, enhanced by superbly accurate custom decals, and there’s a whole lot more to see at Michal’s ‘CASE 1455 XL & Bunning Lowlander 105 Mk4 album‘ on Flickr, and at the Eurobricks discussion forum, both of which include links to a video showing the model in action and to building instructions, so you can spread some crap at home!

White Box

Now this is a common sight. Or it was – trucks have short lives in TLCB’s home market so it’s a long time since we’ve seen a 1990s one – but a blank white trailer being hauled by a nondescript tractor unit? They’re everywhere. And in the mid ’90s they didn’t come more nondescript than a DAF FT 95.

The Ford Mondeo of trucks, these mid-’90s DAFs didn’t really seem to be styled, they were just sort of motorway furniture, like bridges and road signs, but this Model Team recreation by TLCB regular Arian Janssens is no less brilliant for that.

Superbly well replicated, Arian’s DAF FT 95.500 ‘Super Space Cab’ is so realistic it’s starting to blend into the background already. Take a closer look at his Flickr album via the link above.

Mr. Kleinstein’s Steam Powered Amusements

Today at TLCB we’re trumpeting this glorious traction engine and trailer built by previous bloggee Nikolaus Löwe (aka Mr_Klienstien), who has opened up his own steam-powered amusement arcade!

Frogger, Time Crisis, and Sega Rally probably aren’t included, (and we’re not really sure what a steam powered amusement might consist of. Well, we had some ideas but they’re definitely not right), but you can see more of the beautiful traction engine that would power them along with the trailered living accommodation that accompanies it at Nikolaus’s ‘Showman’s Engine ‘ album on Flickr.

Click the link above to let one rip!

Secondary Silo

LEGO’s 42112 Technic Concrete Mixer Truck set has split opinion here at TLCB. It looks rather good, continuing the trend of almost Model Team levels of detail alongside working Technic functionality, but to help it accomplish this (and presumably to save cost), the rotating drum is a single purpose-made part, which surely isn’t the point of LEGO at all.

However proving us wrong is Eurobricks’ blaz62, who has redeployed this seemingly single-use piece to a new purpose with his silo transport 42112 B-Model. Featuring working steering, fifth wheel, trailer support legs, and a silo loading/unloading mechanism, blaz’s alternate is packed with Technic functionality centred around the 42112 drum part.

There’s more to see of blaz’s 42112 B-Model, including full specification details, a video demonstrating the model’s features, and a link to building instructions, at the Eurobricks forum. Click the link above to take a look, whilst TLCB Team ponders other uses for that drum piece, with suggestions so far limited to a submarine or a bomb…

Chocolatey Contraband


The humble Kinder Suprise egg – one part tasty Italian chocolate, one part crappy plastic toy – is illegal in the United States. Appalling animal welfare and firearms are fine though.

Fortunately for our American readers, the Kinder contained in the back of this superb Scania 1-Series truck and trailer by Vladimir Drozd is all tasty Italian chocolate and no crappy plastic toy (which is the way we prefer it), so you can have munch too.

Recreated in 1:22 scale, Vladimir’s beautifully detailed Scania includes Power Functions remote control drive and steering, suspension on all wheels, and an automatic trailer hitch.

There are more top quality images of Vladimir’s Kinder delivery truck available to view at his Flickr album, and you can find full build details and a link to building instructions at the Eurobricks forum here.

Take look via the links above whilst we work on our elaborate plan to smuggle deadly Kinder Suprise eggs into the U.S inside some harmless assault rifles.

Tractorly Tragic

These days tractors are often enormous, hugely impressive machines, however in the past they’ve tended to look… a bit shit. Tiny wheels, cabin perched up way to high, microscopic engine struggling along the road – Flickr’s de-marco has nailed it. There’s more to see of de-marco’s ‘Red Tractor T25’ at his photostream, where you can also find building instructions should you wish to recreate this slightly tragic looking vehicle at home – click the link to take a look!

Red Square

The Swedes must have really liked straight lines in the ’70s and ’80s. Volvo of course became famed for their boxiness, but Scania were just as rigid, as proven by this remarkably upright LK 141 truck by Flickr’s Vladimir Drozd. It’s a build that’s also remarkably detailed, looking almost photo-real thanks to exquisitely smooth building techniques. Power Functions motorisation and working suspension also feature and there’s more to see of Vladimir’s red square at his ‘Scania LK 141’ album. Click the link above to head straight there.

Lactose Intolerant

This lovely coffee and cream coloured DAF FAN CF truck, followed by a huge dumping trailer (ah… now the title makes sense!) was discovered by one of our Elves today and comes from previous bloggee and DAF-building specialist Arian Janssens. Brilliant detailing is in evidence throughout and both the trailer and truck’s load areas feature working dumping mechanisms. Which after coffee and cream some readers might need. If you’re still none the wiser try clicking here, and you can see more of Arian’s dumping DAF via the link above. Take a look at that whilst this TLCB writer awaits a call from the editor about ‘inappropriate blog themes’…

Stalin’s Cat

It wasn’t the British or the Americans that sacrificed the most in the Second World War, but Russia, with more lives lost than almost every other country put together. It was fitting then that it was Stalin’s army that victoriously made it to Berlin first to end the war in Europe.

Things quickly changed once the common enemy was defeated though, with Stalin killing millions of his own people to add to the wartime total, and the Soviet Union developing nuclear weapons to match the U.S, ushering in a decades-long Cold War.

Stalin’s wartime victory (and totalitarian regime) led to everything being called something with ‘Stalin’ in it, including the vehicle in this post. Built in Stalingrad, the Stalinec T130 bulldozer was actually an American Caterpillar manufactured under licence, despite the fact the two countries were on the verge of annihilating one another.

We’re not sure if Joseph Stalin ever drove a Stalinec, but he was probably pleased it – like everything else – was named after him, even if underneath it was actually designed by evil capitalist Americans. This lovely Lego recreation of the Stalinec T130 comes from Flickr’s martin nespor, who has also built an impressive Skoda Xena / LIAZ 400 Series truck and low-loader trailer to transport it.

All three models are beautifully constructed and detailed, with both the Skoda Xena and Stalinec T130 featuring remote control drive and steering via bluetooth. The Skoda also includes integrated LED lighting and authentic stickerage to add to the realism, whilst the Stalinec T130’s blade can raise and lower via Power Functions too.

A wealth of imagery is available via Martin’s ‘Stalinec T130’ album on Flickr – click the link above to make the jump to check out the complete gallery of Stalin’s Cat, and here to see more of the more modern Skoda Xena transporting it.

Express Gass

Talking of big boring boxes, here’s a Chevrolet Express Conversion Van. No amount of tinted windows and stickers down the sides could make us want to ride in this hateful pile of American misery, but Ralph has made his (excellent) Miniland recreation of the Chevy Express rather more exciting by the addition of a tow hitch, meaning his beige box of bricks can tow an altogether more interesting Chevy…

Hooked up to the Express is a trailer carrying this magnificent ’57 Bel Air ‘gasser’, complete with a supercharger poking through the hood and a flame paint job, both of which have got the Elves very animated. A cast of unique-looking characters is on hand to make sure she’s runnin’ right and there’s more to see of the Bel Air gasser (and the Express van we suppose) at Ralph’s photostream – click here to make the jump!

Holidays are Coming…

Actually this is the most American thing* we’ve ever seen (following today’s earlier post featuring a ’70s muscle car with a giant flaming bird on the hood).

The Coca Cola Christmas truck is nearly as well-known as the guy drinking the coke on the side of it, and it’s been recreated astonishingly well in brick form by Flickr’s Lasse Deleuran, who might just have built the best Lego-lettering since we last said something had the best Lego-lettering.

Seriously though, it’s a mightily impressive mosaic that not only looks stunningly accurate, it’s so brilliant it almost makes the superb remote control tractor unit fade into the background. Which is what good branding is all about.

There’s more to see of Lasse’s amazing rendition of the probably the world’s most famous truck at his photostream via the link above, where you can also find a link to building instructions so that you can build this design for yourself.

*To maintain our BBC-like impartiality, here’s the Soviet version too!