Tag Archives: Lunar Rover

Ukrovery

The news from Ukraine is heartbreaking. Almost eight decades of peace in Europe has ended, and the human cost is going to be enormous.

We’ve pilloried Putin before (and received threats as a result), but the mask is off now, and what lies beneath it is monstrous.

As such we hope blue and yellow vehicles might feature here a bit more prominently for a while following our recent call, which Flickr’s Frost has answered, rounding off Febrovery with his final lunar rover looking wonderful in Ukrainian colours.

So that’s it for Febrovery 2022, but sadly not Putin’s ‘Special Military Operation’, which – thanks to the heroism of those defending Ukraine – looks far from being over. If you’re one of the 5,000 TLCB readers from Ukraine, or indeed one of the 17,000 from Russia and are as dismayed as the rest of us, a special welcome to these pages to you.

If you’re looking to help the situation in Ukraine but don’t know how, check out the Red Cross Ukraine Crisis Appeal and the UN Refugee Agency Appeal where donations are now open.

Under the Mask

Most LEGO pieces can be used in almost infinite ways. It’s the very purpose of LEGO. However there are a few parts that seem to be defiantly single-use. The Primo ride-on elephant. Anything from the awful Galidor range. And the wearable Bionicle mask.

Designed so that kids could pretend to be defending Mata-Nui or something, the mid-00’s were clearly a difficult time for LEGO. And yet out of adversity comes triumph, in the form of Scott Wilhelm‘s magnificent ‘Mobile Reactor Transport’.

Wearing the life-size Toa face like a tortoise wears its shell, the until-now-pointless-part looks purpose-made for Scott’s half-track rover. Delightful greebling is visible through the mask’s orifices and there’s more to see of the build, including the epically inventive parts usage, at Scott’s photostream.

Click the link above to see what’s under the mask.

Clearly Roving

2022’s Febrovery is drawing to a close, in which Lego builders from around the world have united in their creation of other-worldly transports. Today we round out the roverest of months with four intriguing space-based builds, each of which has deployed a few of LEGO’s more unusual pieces in the pursuit of roving brilliance.

First up is Robert Heim‘s ‘Spaceport Fire Rover’, which features so many LEGO pieces of which we know nothing it’s making us doubt we can do this job. The wheels look like cupcake cases and the rotating cockpit appears as if it’s made from a kid’s sand bucket. We have absolutely no idea what sets they’re all from, but you can find out more at Robert’s photostream via the link.

Next we have martin.with.bricks‘ impressive eight-wheeled rover, which actually looks rather like something we could well see in our lifetime. A determined-looking mini-figure sits at the controls inside the same clear buckety-brick cockpit, whilst a minimalist brick-built lunar surface passes beneath the tyres. Centre articulation and an opening rear hatch add to the fun and you can see more of Martin’s rover on Flickr at the link above.

No longer used as the cockpit, but still featuring prominently in the design, Frost‘s colourful ‘Biotron Corp Spaceplant Relocation Rover’ utilises the same transparent buckets, this time for some sort of lunar re-wilding project. A trans-lime half-dome continues the funky cockpitting however, and there’s more to see of Frost’s space-based conservation via the link above.

Today’s final Febrovery creation takes a rather more utilitarian approach, and is very possibly the reason that Frost’s ‘Spaceplant Relocation Rover’ above is required. Andreas Lenander‘s ‘Dome-rover’ is smoothing its way across a lovely brick-built moon-scape, thanks to some genius tracks and a wonderfully pink classic spaceman sealed within a transparent orb. Andreas has used said orb in other cunning ways during Febrovery ’22 too, and there’s more to see of this and his other Febrovery builds at his photostream via the link above.

And that completes our Febrovery 2022 round-up, which took on quite a transparent theme this year. Febrovery will be back in 2023, but until then there is still a whole month to go in TLCB and Bricknerd’s ‘Festival of Mundanity’ competition, in which we’re looking for vehicles that are rather more earth-bound. What better way to move on from other-wordly oddness than a white Toyota Corolla looking for a parking space…

Lunar Landing

It’s fifty years since the coolest vehicle ever made (apart from the Citroen DS obviously) first landed on the moon.

The Lunar Roving Vehicle (better known as the ‘Moon Buggy’) was a foldable all-wheel-drive EV designed to enable the Apollo astronauts cover a greater area of the lunar surface.

The LRV was used three times between 1971 and ’72, and Flickr’s VALARIE ROCHE has recreated the momentous event five decades later, with a brick-based tribute to the lunar landings suggested to us by a reader.

Valarie’s build includes a fully-foldable LRV, a pair of astronauts (with the names of all twelve to walk on the moon inscribed on the vignette’s base), and a recreation of the LLRE (Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment), which can still be used today to disprove those who think that the above occurred in a studio in L.A.

Valarie is hoping the build will become an official LEGO set, and you can check it out in more detail (and help to make that a reality) by visiting Valarie’s photostream. Click the link above to rove the lunar surface fifty years ago.

We’re Going to Need a Bigger Cracker

Everybody knows the moon’s made of cheese. Which means that the ‘Moonmouse MkII’ makes perfect sense to us. Horcik Designs owns the mind behind it and you can check it out on Flickr by clicking these words.

Galactic Piratic

Uh oh! Space Pirates! You know, pirates… but in space! Flickr’s captainsmog owns the mind that has magnificently merged two of LEGO’s most beloved themes and you can see more of his piratical antics via the link above.

Oh, Go On Then

FebRovery really is over… (isn’t it Markus Rollbuhler and Chris Perron?). Luckily Markus and Chris’s building skills are significantly better than their timekeeping, so here are two more rovers before we really will get back to posting cars. Probably.

Markus’s effort (above), entitled ‘Stardust Snooper’, harks back to LEGO’s earliest space themes in its purpose, being solely an exploratory rover. A living space and research lab support the crew of two and there’s more to see on Flickr by clicking here.

Today’s second rover comes from Chris Perron, whose Blacktron ‘Surface Scout’ is also apparently an exploratory vehicle. Just one with a giant double laser cannon thingy on the roof. Four wheel steering and a beautifully built cockpit for one feature alongside the ginormous death ray and there’s more to see of Chris’s build on Flickr.

And here endeth the FebRovery Rovers. Unless someone uploads a cool one tomorrow. Now let’s find some cars…

Febrovery Finale

There was a whole extra day in this year’s Febrovery competition, with many builders taking advantage of this to squeeze their creations across the finish line. And some still missed it…

In celebration of those that didn’t quite manage the deadline, which was fittingly extended this year for space-based reasons, here are three of our favourite rovers that might be more Marovery than Febrovery.

First (above) is Scott Willhelm‘s enormous entry, complete with magnificent brick-built wheels fitted to ends of whatever you all those chassis-arm-thingies. Those chassis-arm-thingies are a bit of a theme this year, kinda like full-width light bars appearing on literally every new car design of late, but much like them they do look cool. See more at the link!

Our second fashionably-late Febrovery entry comes (above) from Faber Mandragore, who has also deployed chassis-arm-thingies to great effect. A transparent domed cockpit and an assortment of science fictiony equipment keep the build suitably futuristic and there’s more to see at Faber’s photostream via the link above.

Our final featured Febrovery creation (above) is very possibly our favourite, eschewing cool chassis-arm-thingies for a single slightly tragic looking jockey wheel, reminiscent of those miserable looking tractor tugs you see at the airport.

Spectacularly inappropriate for a surface littered with craters and rocks, and with an exhaust stack that raises unanswerable questions about how an internal combustion engine works without air, ‘Benny’s Space Trike’ is clearly our winner and you can see more courtesy of Blake Foster by clicking here.

Until next year, keep rovin’…

Wheelie Big Cheese

FebRovery is nearly over, but as we approach the end of the annual rover-building bandwagon we’ve got time to squeeze a few more in. Today’s is a fine way to finish, as surely all good events end with cheese. David Roberts‘ is the builder behind this ‘Edam Rover’, a giant wax-skinned contraption used in the Cheese Mining industry that has been so famously represented in countless Lego creations. Grab yourself a cracker and head to David’s photostream via the link above for a taste.

Double Bubble

It’s Valentine’s Day, and what better way to show the Classic Spacewoman in your life that you love her than through a romantic journey across the wilderness of an empty moon? Flickr’s Horcik Designs has built the perfect tool for the job, with this brilliant Neo-Classic Space rover able to transport two mini-figures in style thanks to separate bubble canopies suspended above the rover’s six wheels. This setup may make conversation difficult of course, but perhaps that’s the secret to a long and happy relationship. Click the link above to head out on a date across the moon.

Lunar Rescue

The annual nerd-filled bandwagon that is Febrovery is upon us once more, with rovers of all shapes and sizes expected top appear over the next four weeks. For those new to this blog and/or the online Lego Community, we’re not referring to the defunct British car manufacturer (although maybe one day we’ll run our own – considerably less cool – Febrovery…), rather the wheeled contraptions that inhabit all sorts of far away planetary objects in the minds of Lego builders.

This is one such vehicle, TFDesigns / Frost‘s ‘Roveside Assistance Wrecker’, built to fix your magnetonium fusion reactor, busted thread sprocket, solar panel failure, or any other cosmic malady. With a brick-seperator tow hitch, the coolest wheels we think we’ve ever seen, and that canopy again, it’s a fine way to kick off the Febrovery month. Call Intergalactic Roveside Assistance via the link above for more.

Tragic Band*

We’ve waited three days for our Elves to find something blog-worthy and then they bring back this…

‘This’ is Sheo.‘s ‘Tragic Band’, a collaborative build containing an Aeschylus, a Sophocles and a Euripides. With our vast knowledge of all things sci-fi we naturally know what each of these is and does, but we don’t want to write it here so as not to show up the other Lego sites.

It’s a stunning build though, with some exquisite attention to detail throughout each of the three sci-fi vehicles and to be found in the landscape too, and there’s more to see of Sheo.’s collaboration, including links to view each creation individually, via the hyperlink in the text above.

*There are a few bands we could use for today’s title song. Lynyrd Skynyrd and Badfinger are the obvious choices, but we’ll go with the tragically-lost Viola Beach.

Basic Blacktron

LEGO’s Classic Space themes have gotten increasingly kick-ass over the years as builders have become ever more ambitious (see here, here and here). Much as we love these elaborate and slightly terrifying builds, there’s something nice about seeing a classic theme built, well… classically.

Case in point; this Blacktron Scout is in all likelihood a pretty pointless machine (future mini-figures have conquered space but still need to drive around on the surface to find stuff?) providing no discernible use whatsoever, but it’s so harmlessly cool that we can’t help but like it. George and Anthony here are off on a journey across the planetary surface to look at rocks or something, whilst the on-board computer flashes lights and makes booping noises. It’s all so delightfully meaningless!

There’s more to see of this ‘Blacktron Scout’ courtesy of Krzysztof Cytaki of Flickr – click on the link to look at rocks or something whilst a computer flashes lights and makes booping noises.

Space Container

Oh. Crap.

That’s what went through this writer’s head when he entered TLCB Towers this morning. The Elves don’t have a bedtime as such, returning to the office as and when they find a blog-worthy creation, although they often sleep in their cage room when we turn the lights out in-between foraging for builds.

Normally this is a peaceful affair, with only minor scuffles reported the following morning. That was not the case today.

Squashed Elves where everywhere, ingrained into the carpet or slammed against furniture. They’re resilient little creatures so they’ll all be fine (probably), but recovering our Elven workforce to a functioning state and cleaning up the Elven bodily fluids spilt during the night is not a fun job. Still, at least we get paid to do it. No that’s not right…

The cause of the destruction was found abandoned in the corridor with an Elf squashed underneath it and another swinging miserably from the crane mounted on the rear.

But what on Earth was it? Well it turns out ‘on Earth’ is the wrong place to start, as this amazing machine is apparently a ‘Martian Heavy Transporter’, a six-wheel-drive, skid steer, off-road crane truck, built to carry containers across the Martian landscape.

Each of those six wheels is fully suspended and powered by an individual XL Motor, with all six hooked up to a BuWizz bluetooth control that delivers up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own Power Functions system. No wonder it could catch the fleeing Elves.

Mounted on the top of the chassis is an enormous remotely operated linear-actuator powered crane that can pull a large container onto the rear of the vehicle with ease, in a manner somewhere between LEGO’s neat 1994 6668 Recycle Truck and something from Robot Wars, or slide it to the ground by unfurling itself rearwards.

It’s a seriously slick piece of engineering and one we’re properly impressed by, even if it the cause of some considerable tidying up plus the need to administer a bit of Elven healthcare. Whilst we get on with that you can see more of this remarkable vehicle courtesy of desert752 of Eurobricks / Kirill Mazurov (aka Desert Eagle) of Flickr.

Head to Eurobricks and/or Flickr via the links for more, where a video of Desert / Kirill’s ‘Martian Heavy Transport’ and a complete gallery of imagery can also be found.

Life’s Ace in Classic Space!

If yesterday’s Classic Space recruitment poster didn’t do the trick then this surely will! From bi-pedal mechs and lunar rovers to drop ships and mining tractors, Classic Spacemen and Spacewomen get to pilot all sorts of awesome machinery. And, being strictly research-based, there’s virtually no chance* of being blown up or imprisoned by Blacktron agents! Yu Chris continues the Classic Space recruitment drive and there’s more to see of his wonderful array of Classic Space vehicles on Flickr. Click the link above to sign up!

*Not a guarantee.