Tag Archives: Space

Sandbeetle

Lego Octan Sandbeetle

We’re not sure what this is or what it does, but it’s absolutely magnificent! Built by Flickr’s BobDeQuatre it’s called the ‘Ocean Sandbeetle’, and it’s made us wonder why all cars don’t have five wheels. Whilst we figure out how we can up the wheel count on the office Rover 200 you can check out Bob’s build via his photostream by clicking here.

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Today’s Programme is Brought to You by the Letters ‘T’ and ‘U’

Lego Ford Model T

Some wise words from Sesame Street, which has been playing on the old TV in the Elves’ cage room to help them learn to spell. A human hand hidden inside some fuzzy felt with eyes stuck on top is clearly an effective learning aid, as following Elmo’s alphabetical directive the Elves have returned with two letter-based finds today!

Our ‘T’ creation (above) comes from Flickr’s Jonas Obermaier, a neat 1920s Ford Model T pick-up in mini-figure scale. Mini-figures who are up to no-good we think, as any 1920s vehicle near a ‘Keep Out’ sign usually spells trouble. Find out what they’re up to at the link above.

Today’s ‘U’ creation (below) was also found on Flickr, and comes from Joshua Brooks. It too is mini-figure scale, and it’s apparently a UT-60D U-Wing fighter from one of the many Star Wars battles in which some plucky pilots try to thwart a giant evil space station. It could therefore be from literally any Star Wars story as far as we know, so for a fuller back-story (and to check out what is a really lovely creation) click the link above or wait for it to appear on a blog that’s nerdier than this one.

Lego UT-60D U-Wing Star Wars

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Still Not a Car

Klingon Bird of Prey

Time to feature another ship on TLCB, only this time it’s of the space-going variety. Birds of Prey usually strike fear into the hearts of TLCB Elves as they roam the highways and byways, searching for Lego models. Quite a few of our workforce have become tasty* snacks for kestrels and buzzards over the years.

This classic Klingon warship has been built by Kevin J. Walter over a period of 8 years from virtual model to real bricks. It features some impressive and unusual design and detailing which should be interesting to builders of all sorts of Lego MOCs. Click the link in text to zoom into the details on Flickr. Now, can we find something with wheels on to blog in 2017?

Klingon Bird of Prey

*Possibly quite chocolaty, given the Elves’ diet of Smarties.

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Cat’s Anus

Lego Cargo Ship

The Lego Car Blog Elves, held captive over Christmas, have all been released back into the internet to continue their unending and poorly paid search for the web’s best Lego creations.

Upon unlocking TLCB Towers this morning a particularly speedy Elf had already returned with a find, and is now happily consuming the rewards associated with a meal token. So what did it find?…

Lego Space Freighter

Built by TLCB favourite David Roberts, today’s post is a curious spaceship of feline colonising design. Not in that its purpose is to conquer the universe’s cats. Nor is it piloted by cats intent on universe domination. Rather – and there’s no delicate way to put this – it looks a bit like a cat’s arse when it’s taking a shit…

Despite this unfortunate anatomical resemblance it is a lovely build, and it has an intriguing back-story too. You can discover more of both the ship and the story which spawned it at David’s Flickr photostream via the link above. Just bring a plastic bag and a small spade.

Lego Space Freighter

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Surface Rider

Lego Sci-Fi Off-Road

This gloriously retro sci-fi off-road racer comes from TLCB newcomer Faber Madragore, and it’s everything we could wish for in a Classic Space vehicle. Old-school solid Technic tyres? Check. Working suspension? Check. Magnificently ’80s styling? Check. And it’s yellow! In fact we like it so much we think we ought to run a competition next year to encourage more builds like this. While we mull that over you can check out Faber’s wonderful ‘Surface Rider’ creation at his photostream – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Surface Rider Lunar Buggy

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CUTS

Lego Classic Space

This glorious machine is a Command Unit Transport System, and it is absolutely wonderful in every way. Held aloft by four rotating tracks with a twin-seat asymmetrical cabin, a detachable command unit, and featuring some brilliant retro-futuristic styling, the CUTS* is one of the most coveted vehicles in TLCB office this year. Flickr’s Bongobert has the imagination from whence this magnificent vehicle came and there’s loads more to see at his photostream – click the link above for all the images.

*Just don’t ask what the Nautical variant is called.

Lego Classic Space Command Centre

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What’s in the Box?

Lego Space Lorry

This is a Space Lorry, which is just like a regular lorry, only in space! This one, complete with a magnificent back story, comes from the unique mind of David Roberts, and it’s used for transporting artificially-grown* mini-figure hands across the planet of Bysedd VII to supply the intergalactic greeble trade. See more at the link above.

*Coincidentally there are a lot of one-handed mini-figures on Bysedd VII. We have been told this is an unrelated phenomenon.

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Swanning Around

swan-01

Whilst most of the sci-fi Lego world has been focused on building massive SHIPs for SHIPtember or trying to come to terms with the perpetually enigmatic Ma.Ktober, Tim Henderson has taken his own path with the “Swan“. Tim says that it’s the biggest spacecraft that he’s built but it stills looks a nice size to take for a swoooosh. Added to this are plenty of opening hatches and play features. The ship looks to be a great toy, as well as being good to look at. As its origins are in the Corellian shipyards of Star Wars, that will keep another cohort of spacers happy too. What’s not to like? Click this link to enjoy the comprehensive back story and greebles on Flickr.

swan-02

In the meantime, at the other end of the size scale, is “Lord Cockswain’s Endangerer”. Worth blogging for the name alone, it’s a nice example of economic micro-scale building. Grantmasters is the builder and here’s the link to his Photostream.

endangerer

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56 Degrees of Separation

separators

According to a theory set out in 1929, everybody in the world is just 6 friendship links away from everybody else. This puts the all of world’s population worryingly close to every one of the 257½ TLCB Elves. Perhaps it’s time to equip yourself with your own version of Mr. Airhorn?

In the meantime, Flickr’s F@bz has found something to do with the brick separators which seem to come with every Lego set nowadays. He’s used no less the 56 of them to make the hull of his Altura 2nd spaceship. Some of them came from his Juuken SHIP, which we featured in our SHIPtember 2015 Review. Click the link in the text to see more of this unusual craft.

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Viper MK II

colonial-viper

Being a car blog, we generally expect our Vipers to be made by Dodge, rather than a fictitious manufacturer from Earth’s colonies in outer space. Then again, years of blogging sci-fi builds has left us with as much understanding of the genre as the Elves have of their long-term, index-linked pensions superannuation, so we have an excuse.

This particular Colonial Viper Mk II has been built by Chris Maddison for this year’s SHIPtember festival. The 104 stud long SHIP is in stark contrast to the mighty battlecruisers and huge cargo carriers that people usually build. Instead it’s a single seat, lightweight space-fighter (though it does weigh 23lbs!). Click this link to see the album on Flickr, including the removable cockpit and greebled engines.

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A Dreadful Angel

da-02

With SHIPtember 2016 drawing towards a close, the photo pool is beginning to fill up with all sorts of designs. Perhaps the most graceful this year is Jonathan Walker’s Dreadful Angel. The SHIP uses novel brick-bending techniques for its curved central engine core. Long prongs reach for and aft, looking intriguingly structurally improbable, with smooth sloping gradients.

Strange and innovative, it’s well worth clicking this link for a closer look or clicking this link to see Jonathan’s previous SHIP, which headlined our review of SHIPtember 2014.

da-01

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Classy Space

Lego Classic Space Explorer

The Elves are feeling spacey at the moment, which is giving us a bit of a headache. A – because they’re running around the office making ‘pew pew’ sounds (but we’ve all done that), and B – because TLCB staff are well out of their depth when it comes to describing anything science fiction related.

Anyhoo, whilst we don’t know what this ‘Galaxy Explorer Class Craft’ by Flickr’s Alec Hole does, we do know that it’s an utterly magnificent build, possibly one of the finest mini-figure scale spaceships that we’ve ever published. There’s lots more to see of Alec’s Classic Space creations on Flickr – click the link above to take a look.

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Cyber Snail

Lego Space Snail

And now for something completely different. No, we don’t know either, but you can see more of this courtesy of Karf Oohlu, the mind of whom we imagine is like one of those Salvador Dalí paintings with all the melting clocks.

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Photoshop in Space

Lego Sword Spaceship

This spectacular image, part of this year’s SHIPtember, is the work of Flickr’s incredibly talented Michał Kaźmierczak aka Migalart. Showcasing both what can be achieved in the brick and via Photoshop, you can see more Michal’s enormous ‘Sword’ spacecraft in a selection of stunning backdrops at his photostream – click the link above to make the jump.

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Shiptember (again)

Lego Spaceship

We’ve got it this time. Shiptember, nothing to do with galleons from the 18th century, brings together builders from every corner of the online community (but usually the nerdier ones) for a month of creations that are a Seriously Huge Investment in Parts (SHIP). To qualify spaceships must be at least 100 studs long, as decreed by someone a long time ago for reasons long forgotten, and the results are – as you’d expect – massive. This is the 106-stud long SVB Kilimanjaro by Flickr’s Shannon Sproule, we have absolutely no idea what it does, and there’s lots more to see here.

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