Tag Archives: Space

Space Crane

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Able to land a fully self-contained living quarters onto almost any surface (liquid and gas planets not included), the Neo-Classic Space Sky Crane will enable you to continue your Classic Space research 24/7!

Contact Pascal Neo-Classic Space Sky Cranes for a free no obligation quote, and advance your Classic Space exploration today!

Black-AT

In some kind of TLCB nightmare, Flickr’s Jens Ådne J. Rydland has managed a gloriously successful mashup of two sci-fi themes about which we know nothing. So here’s one of those walking things from Star Wars merged with LEGO’s own Blacktron and Ice Planet themes, for a reference so nerdy it’s probably got adenoids. Join the sci-fi convention via the link above, whilst this TLCB Staffer tries to counterbalance writing this by drinking a beer and giving a wedgie to one of the Elves or something.

Rocketman*

The brave classic spacemen and spacewomen of, um… Classic Space, have been exploring the galaxy for four decades now. Forming the backbone of their exploratory equipment is the LL-928 Galaxy Explorer, recently updated some forty years after it first flew, and captured here in a maintenance hangar in a rarely-seen ‘off-duty’ image courtesy of Rob.

With the engines removed from the spacecraft for maintenance it would be rude not to climb aboard one for some static ‘testing’. Classic spaceman Shawn looks like he’s having a splendid time atop the disconnected propulsion system, but we suspect his colleagues are most unamused at the prospect of recalibrating the whole thing thanks to his bucking-bronco moment.

Rob’s wonderfully immersive images are a lovely homage to one of LEGO’s most fondly remembered themes, and you can join the mini-figures of Classic Space and the 10497 Galaxy Explorer set in the maintenance hangar at his photostream via the link above.

*Burning out his fuse up here alone...

To Boldly… Oh

We thought this was that famous spaceship from Star Trek, but – as with almost anything we think we know about sci-fi – we were wrong. No matter, because the ‘USS Goldsmith’ (which might still be from Start Trek, we’re not sure…) by Flickr’s Tim Goddard is an excellent build, with the overlapping plates forming the, er… round bit, as confusing to us as the whole Star Trek franchise. Beautiful presentation matches the build quality and there’s more to see of The-Maybe-Star-Trek-USS-Goldsmith at Tim’s photostream. Click the link to Boldly Go. Probably.

Lift-Off!

It’s Neo-Classic Space time here at The Lego Car Blog, and we know what you’re thinking; “Uh oh, here comes another failed attempt by TLCB to understand a sci-fi theme…”.

And you’d be right. We suck at sci-fi. Many other things too, but especially sci-fi.

Still, some builders absolutely do not, and Flickr’s OA KD is one of them. OA KD’s impressive back-catalogue includes enormous space bases, 6×6 rovers, lunar sheep, and whatever this is, all rendered beautifully in Neo-Classic Space style.

His latest is this Neo-Classic Space transport, a sort of spacey Sikorsky Skycrane, complete with three chunky swappable space containers. Yes we are just adding the word ‘space’ in front of things to cover our sci-fi ineptitude.

No matter, because you can check out all of OA KD’s space-based builds at his photostream, where sci-fi competence is immeasurably higher than it is here – click the link above to make the jump to Neo-Classic Space brilliance, whilst we get back to cars and stop embarrassing ourselves…

What’s the Matter?

This funky looking device is a ‘Matterphase Neutrino Skimmer’ which – according to Flickr’s Rubblemaker – is “an experimental craft that can harness the power of neutrinos to pass through solid matter.” And just like adverts for shampoo, who are we to argue with infallible science like that!

A Neo-Classic Space aesthetic, which deploys some rather cunning usage of Bionicle pieces, surely helps with the aforementioned physics, and there’s more to see of Rubblemaker’s build on Flickr. Click the link above to harass the flower of albinos to gas through a squalid platter. Or something.

Snow Cone

Today’s ice-based erection is brought to you by Markus19840420, whose hefty rocket is rising skywards ready for launch.

A 6×6 transport rover sits underneath the frosty phallus, whilst two mini-figures watch the action from the sidelines, and you can join them at Markus’ photostream via the link above.

Under the Mask

Most LEGO pieces can be used in almost infinite ways. It’s the very purpose of LEGO. However there are a few parts that seem to be defiantly single-use. The Primo ride-on elephant. Anything from the awful Galidor range. And the wearable Bionicle mask.

Designed so that kids could pretend to be defending Mata-Nui or something, the mid-00’s were clearly a difficult time for LEGO. And yet out of adversity comes triumph, in the form of Scott Wilhelm‘s magnificent ‘Mobile Reactor Transport’.

Wearing the life-size Toa face like a tortoise wears its shell, the until-now-pointless-part looks purpose-made for Scott’s half-track rover. Delightful greebling is visible through the mask’s orifices and there’s more to see of the build, including the epically inventive parts usage, at Scott’s photostream.

Click the link above to see what’s under the mask.

Clearly Roving

2022’s Febrovery is drawing to a close, in which Lego builders from around the world have united in their creation of other-worldly transports. Today we round out the roverest of months with four intriguing space-based builds, each of which has deployed a few of LEGO’s more unusual pieces in the pursuit of roving brilliance.

First up is Robert Heim‘s ‘Spaceport Fire Rover’, which features so many LEGO pieces of which we know nothing it’s making us doubt we can do this job. The wheels look like cupcake cases and the rotating cockpit appears as if it’s made from a kid’s sand bucket. We have absolutely no idea what sets they’re all from, but you can find out more at Robert’s photostream via the link.

Next we have martin.with.bricks‘ impressive eight-wheeled rover, which actually looks rather like something we could well see in our lifetime. A determined-looking mini-figure sits at the controls inside the same clear buckety-brick cockpit, whilst a minimalist brick-built lunar surface passes beneath the tyres. Centre articulation and an opening rear hatch add to the fun and you can see more of Martin’s rover on Flickr at the link above.

No longer used as the cockpit, but still featuring prominently in the design, Frost‘s colourful ‘Biotron Corp Spaceplant Relocation Rover’ utilises the same transparent buckets, this time for some sort of lunar re-wilding project. A trans-lime half-dome continues the funky cockpitting however, and there’s more to see of Frost’s space-based conservation via the link above.

Today’s final Febrovery creation takes a rather more utilitarian approach, and is very possibly the reason that Frost’s ‘Spaceplant Relocation Rover’ above is required. Andreas Lenander‘s ‘Dome-rover’ is smoothing its way across a lovely brick-built moon-scape, thanks to some genius tracks and a wonderfully pink classic spaceman sealed within a transparent orb. Andreas has used said orb in other cunning ways during Febrovery ’22 too, and there’s more to see of this and his other Febrovery builds at his photostream via the link above.

And that completes our Febrovery 2022 round-up, which took on quite a transparent theme this year. Febrovery will be back in 2023, but until then there is still a whole month to go in TLCB and Bricknerd’s ‘Festival of Mundanity’ competition, in which we’re looking for vehicles that are rather more earth-bound. What better way to move on from other-wordly oddness than a white Toyota Corolla looking for a parking space…

Moon Muscle

Flickr’s Febrovery build-a-thon is drawing to a close. There have been some wonderful entries so far which we have… er, missed completely, seeing as a) we don’t understand sci-fi and b) we’re interested in things far more mundane at the moment…

Had we not blogged this one though, TLCB Elves would’ve started a riot, as it’s really not mundane at all. Frost (aka TFDesigns) owns the mind behind this glorious rover-based muscle car homage, which is fitted with some of the most splendid wheels we’ve ever seen.

Racing stripes and a giant wing complete the Elven excitement, and there’s more to see of his marvellous moon-based muscle car at his photostream. Take a look via the link above, and we’ll be back with some things far more mundane tomorrow…

Space Karts

It’s race day at the lunar track, and an eclectic mix of characters are watching the kart-based antics of the Classic Space-kids. Flickr’s Frost (aka TFDesigns!) is the builder and – if you’re weird enough – you can join the spectators trackside via the link above.

Lunar Landing

It’s fifty years since the coolest vehicle ever made (apart from the Citroen DS obviously) first landed on the moon.

The Lunar Roving Vehicle (better known as the ‘Moon Buggy’) was a foldable all-wheel-drive EV designed to enable the Apollo astronauts cover a greater area of the lunar surface.

The LRV was used three times between 1971 and ’72, and Flickr’s VALARIE ROCHE has recreated the momentous event five decades later, with a brick-based tribute to the lunar landings suggested to us by a reader.

Valarie’s build includes a fully-foldable LRV, a pair of astronauts (with the names of all twelve to walk on the moon inscribed on the vignette’s base), and a recreation of the LLRE (Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment), which can still be used today to disprove those who think that the above occurred in a studio in L.A.

Valarie is hoping the build will become an official LEGO set, and you can check it out in more detail (and help to make that a reality) by visiting Valarie’s photostream. Click the link above to rove the lunar surface fifty years ago.

Water on Mars

Mars. Our closest neighbour that isn’t orbiting us, and bleak desolate planet where water turns directly from a solid to a vapour, and back again.

Cue BobDeQuatre‘s ‘Dionysus’ armoured water tanker, a nuclear-powered transport, capable of carrying large quantities of water from remote extraction sites back to Mars Corporation outposts. Or something like that.

Bluetooth remote control via an SBrick and a rather snazzy paint-job caught our attention, and there’s more to see of Bob’s water-carrying martian on Flickr via the link.

Black Harvest

We’ve never thought about the villainous Blacktron empire’s more mundane needs before. But even an evil space organisation needs to eat. You can’t go thieving satellites on an empty stomach.

Fortunately Flickr’s Dario Đipić has thought about it, and the result is one of the most alien-looking vehicles we’ve ever published, even though the design is rooted in those in common usage today.

That might be because, despite the wonderful work they do feeding the planet, combine harvesters looks absolutely terrifying, and thus are weirdly suited LEGO’s classic space baddies theme.

Head out into the alien fields via Dario’s photostream, and keep the empire of evil from going hungry.

Fifty Shades of Bley

Ok, one shade (this isn’t the 42115 Lamborghini Sian set), but certainly fifty types of bley.

Blueish-grey (hence ‘bley’) replaced LEGO’s ‘light grey’ colour in around 2005 for reasons we don’t understand, and The Brick Artisan has embraced the hue wholly with his ‘Classic Space Compact Transport Rover’, which looks a bit like a spacey airport luggage tractor.

Said rover not only contains a whole lot of bley, it features a delightfully elaborate and possibly radioactive load too, as this Classic Spaceman apparently heads to the Classic Space recycling centre. Our Earth-based equivalent of this trip is only to transport TLCB’s broken electrical devices and old pieces of wood (although we do also use a Rover), so this trip looks far more exciting!

There’s more to see of The Brick Artisan’s ‘Classic Space Compact Transport Rover’ on Flickr, where – if you have sufficient bley – you can recreate it for yourself as building instructions are available. Click the link above to make the jump!