Tag Archives: Neo-Classic Space

Modular Building

LEGO’s brilliant line-up of modular buildings have been a roaring success, but they’re not really TLCB fodder. This awesome Neo-Classic Space ‘T-ATV’ by Flickr’s SweStar is though, and it’s ‘modular building’ too. Sort of.

A superb tracked chassis can carry an assortment of spacey things atop it, including a cabin that doubles as a spaceship, a pair of containers for important spacey-looking devices, and there’s even a mini-figure jet-suit arrangement concealed in the back!

Each module can stand alone as a thoroughly good build, and add them all together and you have a model with such great playability that this TLCB Writer could happily spend an entire afternoon swooshing and tracking and doing other suitably spacey stuff with it.

Whilst he does that you can see more of SweStar’s brilliant build at his ‘T-ATV’ album on Flickr – click the link above for more modular building.

Not a Car

‘Aren’t you supposed to be a bloody car blog?!’ some of you might be wondering. And you’d have a point. But there is a car (kinda) coming. Until then here’s a spaceship, which – whilst not a car in any way – is pretty awesome. Tommaso Ferrarese (aka frombol) is the builder, whose Neo-Classic Space creation is packed with building techniques so cunning you could brush your teeth with them. See more of this incredible build on Flickr via the link.

Febrovery Finale

It’s the last day of Febrovery, meaning our Elves will cease bringing back sci-fi nonsense and we can re-start blogging cars! Before then though, we have three (excellent) Febrovery creations to share, about each of which we know absolutely nothing. We’re counting the hours until it’s cars again…

First up is a Febrovery entrant that is at least relatable to our humdrum transport here on Earth, being a space school bus by Flickr’s Tyler (aka Legohaulic). A diverse list of alien children are present for the trip to space school and there’s more to see at Tyler’s photostream via the link.

The second creation in our Febrovery Finale come from regular bloggee Horcik Designs, whose space tanker merges Neo-Classic Space and Octan to brilliant effect. Twenty four wheels make it exactly six times better than anything in TLCB office car park and there’s more to see on Flickr. Click the link above to make the jump to Neo-Classic Space.

Ah ‘Ice Planet 2002′, when years starting with a ’20’ seemed super futuristic. This funky looking rover by Carter pays tribute to the oft-forgotten vintage theme, and includes the coolest wheels seen since your Mum fitted spinners to her mobility scooter. There’s more of Carter’s ‘Ice Scout’ to see on Flickr – click the link above to check it out.

Roving Large

We like large off-road trucks here at TLCB, so imagine how cool we think a large off-road truck is that lives in space! That’s right; less cool – but as sci-fi is all the Elves will bring back at the moment for some reason, here’s a large off-road truck that lives in space. However, it is – as you can see here – rather awesome…

Built by Flickr’s martin.with.bricks, this enormous 10×10 Neo-Classic Space carrier measures almost 60cm long, features two space containers (which are like regular containers, only in space), and includes a wonderfully detailed cabin. Part of the ‘Febrovery’ monthly bandwagon, there’s more of Martin’s brilliant creation to see at his ‘Space Rover’ album – click the link above to take a look.

Hot Rov

We are, as has been well documented here, completely useless at blogging sci-fi. However this sci-fi creation is also a hot rod! Which means that today we’re useless at blogging hot rods too. Thanks TFDesigns.

There’s more to see of TFDesigns (aka Frost)’s Neo-Classic Space ‘RoverRod’ on Flickr, where a wide range of other Febrovery creations can also be found. Click the link above to make the jump.

You Know the Title

Entitled simply ‘Spaceship!’, to quote an irritatingly over-used meme from a certain brick-based movie, this creation by Flickr’s GolPlaysWithLego makes up in building-techniques what it lacks in naming originality, with some wonderfully inventive design elements. Head into Neo-Classic Space via Gol’s ‘Spaceship!’ album via the link above.

The Best Things in Life are Illegal

And so too are the best things in building techniques. Step away from the prescribed use of LEGO bricks and a whole world of fantastic shapes opens up. Exploring this is Rubblemaker, whose Neo-Classic Space ‘Recon Bubblescout’ deploys some mind-bending illegal techniques in the pursuit of the desired form. Head to Flickr via the link above to view something illegal…

Galactic Redux

LEGO’s 928 Galaxy Explorer from 1979 has become something of a legend, being recreated endlessly by countless members of the Lego Community. Here’s another, and it’s done so well we’re forgetting we’re supposed to be a car blog for a bit.

Built by Flickr’s Tim Goddard, this Neo-Classic Space ‘Galactic Explorer’ is a spectacular mesh of superb building techniques, complete with motorised landing gear, a working rear hatch, and a smiling Classic Spaceman at its centre.

There’s more to see of Tim’s brilliant 928 redux at his photostream – click the link above to make the jump to a future version of the future in 1979.

A Wheel Within a Wheel

Wheeling across a planet, within Neo-Classic Space
A spaceman’s on a journey, with a smile upon his face
Like a boulder down a mountain, or a supersonic boom
Blasting into space, pointed directly at the moon
Like a clock whose hands are sweeping, in a never-ending race
As the universe expands, at an ever-growing pace
Like the circles that you find, in the windmills of your mind…

One of music’s most mind-meltingly trippy songs, doctored by a TLCB Writer who really should be doing something more useful, to accompany a mind-meltingly trippy vehicle from builder martin.with.bricks. There’s more to see of Martin’s Neo-Classic Space monowheel speeding across a planet at his photostream – click the link above to enter the windmill of your mind.

Neo-Classic Nightmares


Simultaneously harmlessly brilliant and magnificently creepy, Flickr’s Blake Foster sure knows how to both delight and terrify in equal measure.

This Neo-Classic Space walking rover features the usual perennially smiling Classic Spaceman, but riding atop a mechanised body of horror.

There’s more to see of Blakes’s ‘AT-CST’ at his photostream; Click the link above to make the jump or alternatively try here for something featuring a bit less dread.

Greebling Greatness

‘How many greebles would you like your Neo-Classic Spaceship to have sir?… ‘Yes.’ Mansur Soeleman has used all the greebles to create this greeblicious ‘LL-527 Falchion’ spacecraft. Head to Mansur’s greebletastic album on Flickr via the link above for even more greebley goodness.

The Lobster

“Lobsters live for over one hundred years, are blue-blooded like aristocrats, and stay fertile all their lives.” The lobster is an unconventional theme for a movie or name for a spacecraft, which are normally given an exciting spacey titles or confusing alpha-numeric codes. Not so this one, which has been named after the long-lived crustacean due to the ‘two large claws that it uses to grip containers, in place of any kind of cargo hold’, according to the builder, Blake Foster.

It’s a superbly built spacecraft too, rocking a Neo-Classic Space aesthetic and some exquisite detailing on both itself and the containers it’s carrying. Head into space to take a closer look at Blake’s ‘Blue Lobster’ cargo shuttle via the link above, and remember if you don’t find love in 45 days you’ll be turned into an animal of your choosing*. Why not a choose a lobster?

*If you haven’t watched The Lobster that will mean nothing to you. Which we suspect is most of you. Go watch it, it’s beautiful.

Double Bubble

It’s Valentine’s Day, and what better way to show the Classic Spacewoman in your life that you love her than through a romantic journey across the wilderness of an empty moon? Flickr’s Horcik Designs has built the perfect tool for the job, with this brilliant Neo-Classic Space rover able to transport two mini-figures in style thanks to separate bubble canopies suspended above the rover’s six wheels. This setup may make conversation difficult of course, but perhaps that’s the secret to a long and happy relationship. Click the link above to head out on a date across the moon.

Classic Space Redux

A few Elves got into the stationary cupboard over the weekend and between them ate four entire glue sticks. The result was some very sticky Elf droppings, and also some fairly trippy Elves, which may explain today’s somewhat spaced-out theme.

These two wonderful Neo-Classic Space builds were built for The Brothers Brick (wut!?), each rebooting LEGO’s ancient ‘Classic Space’ line with the latest parts and a whole lot more detail than the original sets achieved back in the early ’80s.

The first (above) comes from space-building legend Alec Hole, who has taken inspiration from the classic 6970 Beta Command Base set from 1980, with its launch pad, control room, and a funky little monorail thing that moved between the two. Alec’s version uses the same recipe but knocks it up a notch with some incredible attention to detail and enough ‘greebling’ for a model five times its size. We love it, and there’s more to see at Alec’s photostream by clicking here.

Today’s second Neo-Classic Space build (below) forgoes the usual rocket-propulsion system for good old fashioned rotors, creating a spacey helicopter that bears a strong resemblance to any one of a number of irritating drones. With Classic Space’s vintage colour scheme, a trans-yellow cockpit, and a smiling Classic Spaceman at the controls, Tim Goddard’s ‘Dragonfly‘ is much more our bag than annoying people in the park with a remote control helicopter (sorry drone owners). Head to Tim’s photostream via link above to see more, whilst we figure out how to remove some insanely sticky Elf droppings.

Grappling Aid

As has been well documented on this site, TLCB writers know absolutely nothing about sci-fi. Which year the Morris Minor switched from 820cc to 950cc? Yes*. Space? No. So instead you’re getting commentary on this excellent spacecraft by Flickr’s Nuno Taborda that refers to it as a cross between a grappling hook and something from your Mom’s ‘special friends’ chest. See more of this burgling-tool-come-sex-aid via the link above.

*1956