Tag Archives: Aircraft

We Are United

This incredible creation is a Boeing 777-(200), as flown by United Airlines, and built over the course of eleven months by Freezeur21 of Flickr.

Constructed in mini-figure scale (which sounds small but makes this massive), Freezeur’s 777 features opening doors, accurate landing gear (which somehow supports the model’s enormous weight), and some properly brilliant decals.

So good is the result you’d be hard-pressed to know this is Lego at first glance, but it is and you can check out more stunning images of Freezeur’s United Airlines Boeing 777-(200) at his photostream. Click the link above to climb on board.

Rainbow Rescue

This year literally everything become rainbow coloured for a bit. Utah’s Bell 407 search and rescue helicopter was ahead of the curve though, already sporting a fantastic rainbow colour scheme that might just be the most difficult paint job to recreate in Lego bricks ever devised.

That didn’t stop Eurobricks’ droomangroup though, who has replicated the Utah Bell medevac helicopter in Model Team form, somehow managing to recreate the rainbow livery in bricks with such precision it’s made our heads hurt.

There’s more to see of drooman’s monumentally clever model at the Eurobricks forum, where you can also find an image of the real Utah Bell 407 search and rescue unit for comparison. Click the link above to follow the rainbow.

Cosmic Cocktail

All the best racing sponsors are selling something that’s bad for you. Cigarettes, beer, cigarettes, energy drinks, and cigarettes were the mainstay of motorsport advertising, before doctors pointed out that it might not be a great idea to promote things that killed people.

These days tobacco companies are effectively banned from motorsport sponsorship (although Scuderia Ferrari are always willing to cash a ginormous cheque), however purveyors of alcohol are still permitted to hawk their wares to racing fans.

The upside of this is some of the coolest liveries in motorsport are still seen today, and – accordingly to David Roberts at least – will continue to be seen for some time yet.

This is David’s ‘Martin I’s Racer’, with a livery that looks a lot like the one used by a certain gin and vermouth-based cocktail company.

Further details and a backstory of drinking puns can be found at David’s photostream – grab yourself a mixer and head to the bar, er… we mean ‘galactic racing circuit’ via the link above.

HaLo MaSter ChEiF 3571!!!

When MOCpages was unceremoniously deleted in an act of cowardly internet douchebaggery, it threw thousands of wonderful creations, inventions, groups, and contests into the digital void. Alongside these though, it also took about three million ‘HaLo MaSter ChEiF 3571!!!’ builds with it. Sliver linings and all that…

We begrudgingly admit though, that Halo models can be good, as proven here by Flickr’s ZiO Chao. ZiO’s Halo Falcon and Warthog are both superbly built and presented, and are further enhanced with custom mini-figures and LED lighting.

There’s more to see of ZiO’s Halo models via the link above, where he hasn’t mis-spelled anything nor asked for likes and comments, which makes us ponder whether these are in fact Halo creations at all…

Fortunate Son

If there are two things associated with America’s involvement in the Vietnam War more than any others, it’s the incessant use of Creedence Clearwater Revival’s ‘Fortunate Son’, and the Bell UH-1N ‘Huey’ helicopter.

Fortunately we like Fortunate Son, and we like the Bell UH-1N Huey too, at least in brick form from Flickr’s [Maks].

[Maks]’s USAF Twin Huey captures the real military helicopter brilliantly, with flex hose skids, brick-built camo, and accurate decals.

There are more superb images of [Maks]’s build to see at his ‘UH-1N Twin Huey’ album – click the link above and start humming Fortunate Son on loop.

Double Trouble

Two things are often better than one. Or so the internet would have us believe. Subscribing to this school of thought is Thomas of Tortuga, whose ‘B-48 Albatross’ heavy bomber features not just a twin boom tail, but two fuselages, two gun turrets, two cockpits, and engines facing in two directions. See double on Flickr via the link above.

Emirates Airbus A380 | Picture Special

Some Lego builders’ user names are just right. This is BigPlanes’ Emirates Airlines Airbus A380 Superjumbo, and it is really, really big.

With a wingspan of 7ft, BigPlanes’ recreation of the world’s largest passenger plane is a constructed in an almost unbelievable mini-figure scale, and uses no hidden supports, metal framework, or glue.

What it does use is tens of thousands of LEGO pieces, several electric motors, and a whole lot of LED lights to faithfully replicate Emirates’ flagship airliner, including both decks, a four-pilot cockpit, working flaps and tail control surfaces, retractable landing gear, and even powered engines.

Each class of travel is accurately represented too, from First (which features a bar, lounge, and even a waterfall fountain), through Business (with fold flat seats and individual screens), to Premium Economy (where passengers’ benefit from their knees not being a structural element of the seat in front), and finally Economy (basically a cattle-truck).

Beautiful spiral staircases link the two decks, which also include luxury bathrooms in First (and holes in the floor for Economy), galley kitchens, and even crew sleeping accommodation.

A monumental undertaking a year in the making, BigPlanes’ phenomenal determination and skill has resulted in surely one of the finest Lego creations ever built. Buy your ticket to fly Emirates at his astonishing ‘LEGO Emirates Airbus A380’ album on Flickr, where forty incredible images are available to view. It’s probably worth spending a little extra to upgrade to Premium Economy though…

Forced (Perspective) Landing

This mini-figure is having an eventful day. Luckily the water is mill-pond calm and his stricken aircraft is sending out its own distress flare. Let’s hope the ship in the distance spots it! Grant Davis is the builder and there’s more to see here.

Oriental Redux

Ah, ‘Orient Expedition’, one of the ‘Adventurers’ sub-themes that we had completely forgotten about. Still, Kevin J. Walter hadn’t, and as such he’s recreated the 7420 Thunder Blazer set from 2003, only his is much, much better.

Johnny Thunder’s wings will no doubt help him to plunder some valuable antiquity of great significance from a vaguely far-eastern culture, and return it to its proper place in the British Museum, where it belongs.

Join the expedition somewhere in the Orient via Kevin’s photostream at the link above.

Hercul-skis

A title so cunning you could brush your teeth with it. You see, this wonderfully liveried aircraft is a Lockheed Martin LC-130H ‘Hercules’, only it’s fitted with skis instead of wheels.

We presume this means it’ll talk incessantly about its gap year in Val-d’Isère with other ski-planes at dinner, and spend most of each February drunk in a cabin at the bottom of a mountain.

It looks great though, and there’s more of the Hercul-skis to see at Evan M’s photostream. Click the link above to join us being drunk at apres-ski. Did we tell you about our gap year in Val-d’Isere?

Ghost Pirate

Disney’s ‘Pirate’s of the Caribbean’ managed to successfully* combine both pirates and ghosts, which – to any 8 year old or TLCB Elf – made it the coolest thing ever.

Their piratical spectres were beaten by a few decades however, by the U.S. Navy, whose ‘VF-84 Jolly Rogers’ squadron operated Phantom II jets from the USS Roosevelt in the 1960s.

Featuring a variety of pointy weapons, superb building techniques, and a ‘skull and crossbones’ tail-fin motif (which – to any TLCB writer – makes it the coolest thing ever), previous bloggee [Maks] has captured America’s ’60s fighter in stunning detail, and there’s more to see of his airborne ghost pirate via the link above.

*Ok, maybe not by the third one. Which was (and still is) one of the worst sequels of all time.

Bye Bye Boeing

After over 50 years of service, Boeing’s mighty 747 is starting to be retired from fleets around the world. The 747 first entered service with the now defunct Pan Am airline in 1970, after they commissioned Boeing to build a plane 2.5 times larger than their existing airliners.

The aim was to reduce expenses by a third per passenger to bring long-distance air travel to the masses, and the 747 fulfilled its brief so well that over 1,500 have been produced to date, with the design single-handedly defining the ‘jumbo jet’ era.

747 production finally ceases next year, as the industry has moved away from ‘jumbo’ aircraft in favour of smaller more fuel efficient airliners, with two-engined planes now capable of flying just as far as their ageing four-engined counterparts.

Anything that reduces air travel pollution is a good thing, but we’ll miss the old ‘jumbo’. Flickr’s saabfan2013 will too by the looks of it, and has created this neat brick-built homage to the 747 in double-decker configuration and Iberia livery.

There are more images of saabfan’s excellent Iberia Boeing 747 to see on Flickr, where you can also find a link to the model on LEGO Ideas should you want the opportunity to place the iconic Jumbo Jet on your desk too. Click the link above to take off.

Horse Truck

Surprisingly we don’t think we’ve ever blogged a horse truck here at TLCB (and we’re reluctant to go into the Archives to check properly as there are rumours of a feral band of TLCB Elves inhabiting them).

Today doesn’t change that though, despite the title, as this lovely Dodge M-37 truck is not a horse truck per say, rather it’s here as ground support for [Maks] previously blogged UH-34D Seahorse U.S Navy helicopter.

That means no attractive horsey girls called Arabella, but still an ace scene that would have been commonplace in the 1960s U.S Navy. There’s more to see of [Maks] Dodge M-37 truck and superb Sikorsky Seahorse on Flickr – click the link above to take a look.

The Last Dakota* in Denmark

The Douglas DC-3 ‘Dakota’ revolutionised air travel before the jet age. And after it to some degree. Originating as a 1930s military design the DC-3 could fly 1,500 miles at 200mph, taking off and landing on short runways, and carrying 6,000lbs of cargo.

The Dakota was so versatile and reliable that it is still in service all around the world, although not in Denmark where just one unit remains airworthy. Previous bloggee Henrik Jensen has built this aircraft, as operated by a non-profit preservation, recreating it beautifully in brick form.

Wonderful techniques and authentic decals add to the realism and there’s more to see of Henrik’s Douglas DC-3 on Flickr – click the link above to fly in Denmark’s last Dakota.

*Today’s (excellent) title song.

Skies over Suez

We love a ’50s MiG. Sure they were a symbol of the oppression of millions, a regime seemingly intent on causing nuclear annihilation (not on their own we might add), and the terror of the Cold War, but they looked so cool!

In service from the early 1950s, almost 11,000 MiG-17s were built for use by a wide variety of scumbag dictatorships, and – somewhat unbelievably – three militaries still operate them today, some ’70 years after the design first flew.

This particular recreation of the Soviet fighter is an Egyptian Air Force unit, as built by John C. Lamarck, and it looks every bit as cool as the real thing. A removable tail-section reveals the jet engine inside, there’s working landing gear, accuarate Egyptian Air Force decals, and a range of exciting-looking weaponry that was used in Egypt’s defeat of the British, French and Israelis during the Suez Crisis in 1967.

What were we saying about the MiG-17 and scumbag dictatorships? Yeh, in this case TLCB’s home nation might not be able to hold the moral ground…

Head to John’s ‘MiG-17F’ album on Flickr via the link above to blow something British up in 1967.