Tag Archives: News

BuWizz Updated

BuWizz

Regular readers here at The Lego Car Blog will have seen a few non-LEGO words appearing every so often in the descriptions of featured models. One of these is BuWizz, a third-party LEGO-compatible bluetooth control and battery that delivers a huge jump in power to LEGO’s Power Functions components and provides remote-control-by-mobile functionality.

We reviewed the BuWizz brick and came away impressed, particularly with the power increase (because who doesn’t want more power!?), but one area where the device could be considered lacking was its app, which was clear and easy to use but nowhere near as programmable as its chief rival SBrick.

BuWizz’s latest update aims to rectify that with the addition of a suite of new functionality including increased customisation, more profiles, advanced power control options, livestream camera support, and a new user interface.

If you already own a BuWizz brick you can download the new app via the last link above, and if you’re yet to try the product you can find out more via the first, where there is also currently 20% off in the BuWizz Summer Sale.

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LEGO Technic H2 2019 | Set Previews!

Our Elves have been sneaking! Following our reveal of the H1 2019 Technic sets another batch of Elves were dispatched to The LEGO Company’s HQ to uncover the H2 additions to the Technic line-up. The survivors returned home over the summer and after much consideration we’re now able to offer our ‘expert analysis’ of LEGO’s latest sets! So, here you go, the H2 2019 LEGO Technic line-up…

– 42098 Car Transporter –

There’s a theme running through the H2 2019 Technic range and, much like your Mom, it’s size. We’ll start with the largest. Or longest at least. This is the 2,500 piece, 3ft long 42098 Car Transporter, a vehicle type that LEGO have dabbled with in the past in the Technic range, but never really tackled properly.

Three models in one, 42098 includes a truck, trailer and a muscle car, all of which are packed with mechanical functions like Technic-of-Old. The aesthetics are very much Technic-of-New though, with plenty of stickers and an increased level of visual realism.

42098 can fit five cars on board by our count, leaving room for four of your own once built. Both the truck and muscle car feature ‘Hand of God’ steering and miniature working piston engines, whilst the truck and trailer include ingenious hand-powered mechanisms to access the top decks, with gears lowering and extending a multitude of ramps to enable a full load to be driven on board.

42098 looks like a really interesting addition to the Technic range, and it’ll be nice to be able to store other sets and MOCs neatly on top of it. Expect the new set to cost c$180/£140 when it reaches stores later this year.

– 42099 4×4 X-treme Off-Roader –

Next we have a set that’s got the Elves very excited. It’s huge, it’s orange, it’s remote controlled, and it features LEGO’s penchant for poor spelling when words contain the letter ‘x’.

The 42099 X-treme Off-Roader looks… well, nuts, and it features LEGO’s new bluetooth remote control, finally catching up with third-party providers such as SBrick and BuWizz who have been offering control-via-phone for some time.

Like the 42098 Car Transporter above, 42099 is a complicated set aimed at ages 11+, but this time it swaps mechanical functionality for LEGO’s Power Functions motor system, now with the addition of the new ‘Control’ bluetooth-compatible app-based operating system.

This gives 42099 superb-looking playability, provided the set’s all-wheel-drive, remotely controlled steering, and suspension are up to the job. Judging by the images we’re hopeful, and if the number of stickers is a measure of off-road ability, the X-treme Off-Roader will be able to climb Everest.

Like all the sets previewed here 42099 will reach stores later this year. We’ll do our best to resist testing its Elf-smushing ability when we get our hands on it…

– 42097 Compact Crawler Crane –

The last H2 2019 Technic set we’re previewing today (but not the last in the range…) is this, the 920 piece 42097 Compact Crawler Crane. Featuring an all-mechanical array of functions including boom extension and raising, four spidery legs that use the huge stabiliser parts from the 42078 Mack Anthem set reviewed here earlier in the year, a winch, and a set of manual tracks, it looks like no crane we’ve ever seen but contains some excellent gear-driven functionality nonetheless.

Still towards the top of Technic’s age range, 42097 is aimed at ages 10+ and will cost around $100/£80, making the H2 2019 line-up one of considerable size and complexity, earning LEGO a few TLCB Points after a slightly lacklustre H1 range.

There’s one more set in the H2 2019 line-up left to reveal, and we’ll do just that later this summer. In the meantime you can check out our preview of the H1 2019 Technic sets here, plus you can visit our Review Library where 100 LEGO sets past and present have been reviewed so far via the link.

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Creator Expert 10269 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy | Set Preview

LEGO’s officially licensed replicas just keep coming! This is their latest, in partnership with motorcycle manufacturer Harley-Davidson, the 10269 Creator Expert Fat Boy.

The first motorcycle in the Creator Expert line, the Harley-Davison Fat Boy becomes the second bike to be recreated in LEGO form following the excellent 42063 Technic BMW Motorrad R 1200 GS Adventure released a few years ago, and brings another new manufacturer partnership to LEGO’s already impressive back-catalogue.

With just over 1,000 pieces the new 10269 set is a hefty thing befitting its name, and it features a few new parts too – including printed Harley-Davison tiles that appear on the neat tear-drop shaped fuel tank and new authentic ‘Lakester’ wheels with very probably the widest tyre ever fitted to a LEGO motorcycle.

The new 10269 set also features a few working functions, including handlebar steering, a moveable gearshift pedal, kickstand and brake levers, and a working replica of the Fat Boy’s ‘Milwaukee-Eight®’ V-Twin engine with a brick-built engine block and pistons, making the Fat Boy the first LEGO set to use a non-specialised brick-built engine since the Technic sets of the 1980s. The model’s authenticity is completed with accurate ‘wicked red’ colouring as well as bespoke decals for the badging, speedometer and license plate.

10269 looks to be another fine addition to LEGO’s officially licensed range, and with Harley-Davison having such a loyal (often fanatical) following worldwide we expect the set to have an appeal as wide as that ludicrous rear tyre. Expect the Creator Expert 10269 Harley-Davidson Fat Boy set to cost around $100/£85 when it reaches stores later this month.

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75895 Speed Champions Porsche 911 Turbo 3.0 | Set Preview

It’s a new set day here at TLCB, as LEGO have revealed their latest officially-licensed entry into the Speed Champions line-up from old favourite Porsche; the most excellent looking 75895 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.0.

If 75895 looks familiar that’s because it is, as LEGO have recycled the design from 2018’s 75888 set, but Porsche have been recycling the 911’s design for decades now so if anything that makes it more authentic.

Featuring 180 pieces including a new-if-slightly-douchbaggy-mini-figure (wearing luxury car-branded clothing is never OK), 75895 includes rubber tyres, a removable windshield to give access to the cockpit, bespoke ‘Porsche’ and ‘Turbo’ decals, and a set of cones which – this being a 1970s Porsche – you can run over as you career off the road in a snap-oversteer/turbo-lag induced moment.

The new Speed Champions 75895 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.0 set will cost around $15 when it reaches stores in August of 2019 and we like it very much. Thumbs up LEGO.

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42110 Technic Land Rover Defender | Set Preview

Oops. We suspect someone is going have an interesting day on Monday. This is the new Land Rover Defender. And by new, we really do mean new. The new Defender it not on sale yet, the press releases haven’t been issued, and camouflaged test cars are still pounding African roads.

Yet here the new Defender is, photographed un-camouflaged, complete with engine specs… only it’s in LEGO Technic form. Oops indeed.

We can’t take the credit/blame for this one as we haven’t yet dispatched our usual team of Elves to sneak into The LEGO Company’s HQ to bring back previews of the upcoming Technic sets. Instead this image was found on the website of a British toy shop, where we suspect it’s been mistakenly uploaded far too early.

Unfortunately the 42110 Land Rover Defender set seems to confirm our misgivings about the direction the new Defender has been taken. Spy-shots of prototypes have hinted at a fairly generic, very un-iconic looking SUV, and that appears to be exactly what we’ve got here. It’s certainly not a design that befits the Defender’s incredible 50 years of continuous production heritage.

Still, the Technic model itself looks properly good, features a slew of new pieces, and we particularly like the olive green colour chosen. The new 42110 Land Rover Defender set is also packed with mechanical functionality, featuring a winch, working steering, suspension, four-wheel-drive with three differentials, and a four-speed gearbox. That the description also claims the officially licensed LEGO set ‘captures the vehicle’s level of refinement’ and features a 6-cylinder engine makes us seriously worry for the real Defender’s future though…

We expect the new 42110 Technic Land Rover Defender set to cost around £160 when it reaches stores later in 2019, and someone to be in a bit of trouble come Monday…

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Honda Civbrick Type R

Life-Size LEGO vehicles have been popping up all over the place of late. From a Bugatti that really drives to a McLaren Senna you can sit in, Chevrolet pick-ups to Volkswagen Campers, and even the humble Toyota Camry, every manufacturer seems to want to see their car built in Lego form.

Honda Australia are the latest to give it a go, courtesy of LEGO Professional and previous bloggee Ryan McNaught and his team of nine master builders.

320,000 bricks and 1,300 hours later and Honda’s Civic Type R has been perfectly recreated in LEGO bricks, from the badge on the bonnet to the wild floating rear wing, with even the wheels constructed from standard LEGO pieces.

Ryan’s Honda Civic was commissioned to coincide with the launch of the ‘LEGO Masters’ TV series airing later this month, in which teams of builders will compete in various construction challenges in the hope of winning $100,000, and where Ryan is one of the show’s judges.

The life-size Civic will go on tour around Australia over the coming months, and if you’re a little too far from Aus  to see the model in person (basically from anywhere that isn’t Australia) click these words to watch a short video of the car courtesy of Honda Australia.

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What’s That Brick?

Lego Piqabrick

LEGO have released literally thousands of brick designs over the years (anyone know how many?). Some of them weren’t even bricks either (take a look at this, this, and even this monstrosity…).

That can make identifying one a real pain, but good news! Cue the nerdiest thing we’ve ever posted (ok, since this at least) – PIQABRICK!

PIQABRICK is effectively a 3D scanner that can identify any LEGO piece, even the oddities above, revealing the part code that can be dropped into third-party brick marketplaces such as BrickOwl and Bricklink.

Now obviously you have to own the piece that you want to identify already, but for those more seriously into the art of LEGO model making, or the few that do it professionally, PIQABRICK could save hours of research.

Take a look at the video below see how it works, and click here to follow the project in advance of its launch on Kickstarter.

YouTube Video

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Life-Size McLaren Senna

Lego McLaren Senna Life-Size

No TLCB hasn’t suddenly gone all low-res, that really is a life-size McLaren Senna hypercar, and it really is made from LEGO bricks. Almost a quarter of a million of them.

Over 2,700 hours were required to built it (plus a similar number in design) with the end result weighing around 1.7 tons. That’s considerably more than any real McLaren road car.

Lego McLaren Senna Life-Size

This life-size LEGO creation is not entirely bricks mind, as LEGO designer Lubor Zelinka and the team of thirty model model-makers behind it have used actual McLaren Senna wheels and have fitted a real McLaren Senna seat, steering wheel and starter button into the cockpit.

That means this life-size LEGO McLaren can be sat in, and with all 467,854 pieces glued you won’t be able to knock anything off! You can do just that too, as the model goes on tour this summer, including a trip to the Goodwood Festival of Speed where previous life-size builds have featured.

Lego McLaren Senna Life-Size

If you’re a UK-based reader of this site, or you fancy a trip to the UK, you can get your tickets for Goodwood here, and if you fancy your own LEGO McLaren Senna, but don’t have a quarter of a million bricks at your disposal, LEGO’s official Speed Champions McLaren Senna set is available to buy now for £12.99.

Lego McLaren Senna Life-Size

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BuWizz Train Pull!

Yes you read that right. The guys over at BuWizz, who have designed a rather clever fully LEGO-compatible bluetooth control/battery, have decided to showcase the power of their little brick by a pulling train! With standard LEGO motors (and only three of them!). Don’t believe us? Take a look via the video above!

If you’d like to see how you can use the power of BuWizz yourself (even if you don’t have an old-timey train carriage handy) you can read our review of the BuWizz device by clicking here.

BuWizz

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#Van Life(Size)

Lego Volkswagen T2 Transporter Life-Size

Once the preserve of smelly hippies, the Volkswagen Transporter Camper has unfortunately now become the default vehicle of insufferable YouTube/Instagrammers promoting #vanlife and #adventure (but mostly themselves), all whilst never being further than fifty feet from a Starbucks’ free WiFi.

Still, that’s not the Transporter’s fault, and today we’re successfully dodging all of the T2’s millennial baggage because, despite the real Volkswagen wheels, this incredible van has been built from 400,000 LEGO bricks by Certified LEGO Professionals Rene Hoffmeister and Pascal Lenhard in just 6 weeks!

Lego Volkswagen T2 Transporter Life-Size

Weighing over 1,500lbs/700kgs and measuring 16ft long Rene Hoffmeister and Pascal Lenhard’s creation is an exact 1:1 scale replica of Volkswagen’s iconic 1960/70s T2 Transporter Camper. There’s even a superbly replicated interior inside the working sliding door, complete with a kitchenette, a functional pop-up roof, and some groovy artwork on the walls. And with no insufferable YouTubers around there’s not an all-natural-vegan-organic-peace-crisp-packet in sight!

Rene and Pascal’s amazing life-size T2 Camper is on show now at the F.re.e Travel and Leisure Fair in Munich (alongside a few real ones), and if you fancy your own LEGO Volkswagen Camper (although a bit smaller) you can check out our review of the official LEGO 10220 Creator Expert Volkswagen Camper set here.

Life-Size LEGO Volkswagen T2 Camper

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10265 Creator Ford Mustang | Set Preview

10265 LEGO Creator Ford Mustang

LEGO on are on quite a roll with their officially-licensed sets at the moment. Spanning the Speed Champions, Creator and Technic ranges, we’ve had authentic replicas from Porsche, Aston Martin, Ferrari, Mercedes-Benz, Caterham and many more besides. Ford are one of the more humdrum manufacturers to partner with LEGO, but for us their cars chosen are some of the coolest in LEGO’s line-up. Revealed today, LEGO’s newest officially-licensed Ford set has to be the coolest of the lot!

Lego 10265 Ford Mustang Review

10265 joins the ‘Expert Creator’ range, a 1,470-piece replica of one the most iconic American cars ever made; the 1960s Ford Mustang. LEGO and Ford have chosen the late-’60s fastback, complete with Shelby stripes and a beautiful blue finish. Printed tiles add authenticity with accurate badging, license plates and gauges, and the new 5-spoke wheels are faithful to those found on the real car.

10265 joins the 10262 Aston Martin DB5 at the top of the creator range, measuring over a foot long and featuring working steering, opening doors, hood and trunk, and adding another 200 pieces to the DB5’s count. With the two sets being the same scale (and the DB5 being packed with 007 gadgets) you might be wondering where those extra 200 parts go, but LEGO has put them to good use! Or bad use, depending on your taste…

10265 LEGO Creator Ford Mustang Review

10265 can be customised with all sorts of go-faster goodies, including a supercharger complete with hood-protrusion, an aero kit consisting of a ducktail rear spoiler and a front air dam, quad side-pipes, and even a rear axle lift.

If you’re a) 10 or b) a TLCB Elf you’ll no doubt love the add-ons included in the set, which are a great idea from LEGO to add extra play value to their new Mustang set. For us these extra bricks would probably go into our spare parts box, as we think they thoroughly ruin the car (as they do in real life too…), but we won’t begrudge LEGO for a second for including them.

10265 LEGO Creator Ford Mustang

To our eyes the new 10265 Expert Creator Ford Mustang set is the best looking officially-licensed vehicle yet, and if you agree you can get your hands on one from March 2019. Aimed at ages 16+ we expect 10265 to retail for around £120/140/$150 and to be the coolest way to spend said cash short of getting a flaming skull tattoo or an electric guitar. Bravo LEGO and Ford!

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Love is a LEGO Brick

Legoland Discovery Centre

Valentine’s Day is fast approaching, and what better way to build (hah!) on your relationship than with an evening of LEGO love!

The Legoland Discovery Centre in Manchester is holding an alternative adults-only Valentine’s Night on Wednesday 13th February, with complete access to the rides, 4D cinema, Miniland, and thousands upon thousands of LEGO bricks!

The centre’s Master Builders will be there holding workshops, there’s speed-dating on the rides (if you’re looking for your compatible brick!), and prizes throughout the night.

To find out more and to book your ‘For the Love of Bricks’ ticket at the Legoland Discovery Centre in Manchester (UK) click the link below!

Legoland Discovery Centre Manchester’s Alternative Valentine’s Night

Legoland Discovery Centre

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334,000-Piece Life-Size Chevrolet Silverado

Lego Chevrolet Silverado

Yup, LEGO have done it again! The latest in a series of life-size replicas (which included a fully drivable Bugatti Chiron don’t forget!), LEGO have added Chevrolet to their list of real-world vehicles built from bricks.

This is the new 2019 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 ‘Trail Boss’ pick-up truck. Well, the one on the left is. The one on the right that looks slightly lower-res is in fact a 334,000 piece full-size LEGO replica of Chevy’s new mid-size truck.

Built by a team of eighteen Master Builders the LEGO Chevy took over 2,000 hours to assemble, measures 20 feet long, 8 feet wide and 6 feet high (exactly the same as the real Silverado), and weighs over 1.5 tons.

Lego Chevrolet Silverado

Commissioned as part of Chevrolet’s tie-up with Warner Brothers Pictures (the guys behind the upcoming The LEGO Movie 2), the brick-built Silverado is currently on display at the Detroit North American Auto Show alongside its more metallic counterparts.

Readers in Detroit (or visiting the Auto Show from further afield) will be able to see the life-size LEGO pick-up at the Chevrolet stand until January 27th, where there’s also a truck-load of LEGO bricks available to play with. For the rest of us not near Detroit but wondering how a 334,000-brick pick-up truck is built, take a look at the video below…

YouTube Video

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The Flickr Photo Snafu

Lego Bigfoot

Flickr?

The Lego Car Blog Elves search far and wide for the very best Lego vehicles that the internet has to offer. Eurobricks, MOCpages, Brickshelf and others all have little Elven footprints across them, but by far the most common source of blog-worthy finds is Flickr.

Previously owned by Yahoo, Flickr – whilst not a dedicated Lego-sharing website like those mentioned above – has proved the default destination for much of the online Lego community, with free image hosting, a mail/message feature, and vibrant community groups.

In 2018 the overlords at Yahoo decided to cash in their Flickr cheque, and sold the site to SmugMug (nope, us neither). SmugMug have wasted no time in redecorating their new house and promptly announced a raft of changes to the site, the chief amongst which is a new 1,000 photo limit for each user.

Uh-Oh Spagetti-O

This new limitation means that from this week many Lego builders will be unable to upload any more images without either opening another account or paying to upgrade to SmugMug’s subscription service. It also means that builders who have already exceeded the 1,000 photo limit will see their images automatically deleted, starting from the oldest.

Lego Bin

Impact on blogging sites

The knock-on effect for sites such as TLCB is that images may be deleted that have been used in past posts, breaking the link to the builder. Our apologies, this means that it’s likely that some links in our past posts will no longer function, and will instead return an error message like this.

Sites that use Flickr to host their images will see any deleted content disappear from their own pages too. The Brothers Brick is one such site where this would have occurred, however they have announced that they will now store all images used in their posts locally, including all past posts – so that even if an image is deleted on Flickr if it’s been blogged at The Brother Brick it will be saved.

What about The Lego Car Blog?

We’re in the fortunate position that all of our images are, and have always been, hosted here – hooray! This means that not a single image will be deleted from TLCB’s archives and that all images blogged here, whether they were found on Flickr or not, are safe.

What next?

We’ll have to see what impact SmugMug’s changes to Flickr have on the Lego community there. Perhaps very little, perhaps a lot, but either way surely the time is right for someone to fix MOCpages…

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2018 | Year in Review

Lego 2019

The Lego Car Blog’s infamous New Year’s Party is fast approaching, so whilst we still have the capacity to write let’s take a look back on the year that was 2018. A cave rescue, a Royal wedding, Facebook douchbaggery, #MeToo, and one Presidential scandal after another, it’s been a busy year!

Stats; The Lego Car Blog passed the 5 million visitor mark a few weeks ago! However as usual we weren’t paying attention and forgot to blog about it. 2018 saw another 900,000 of you joining us here, a roughly 10% drop on the last two years when the site surpassed 1 million visitors per annum.

We mused as to the reasons why this may be a little while back, looking at the rise of Instagram, the fall of MOCpages, and various other factors, but we’ve since realised we’ve written just over 10% fewer posts this year than last. Oops.

Search engines brought just over a quarter of a million visitors to these pages (who knows what they were searching for!), whilst Pinterest and Facebook another 50,000 combined. The rest of you – we assume – came here on purpose, mostly from the United States, with Germany, the U.K and the Netherlands the next post popular.

The Lego Car Blog

Creations; Hundreds of new cars, trucks, motorcycles, aircraft, and the odd spaceship were blogged here at The Lego Car Blog in 2018, albeit around 10% fewer than last year. Top posts were our reveal of LEGO’s new 42083 Technic Bugatti Chiron set, Leviathan’s own Bugatti Chiron creation, and – as always – our Set Review Library, which expanded this year to include the third-party Bluetooth devices SBrick and BuWizz – take a look at what we thought of them via the links.

Lego Master MOCers

Interviews; The Master MOCers series added another two of the world’s finest builders to the Hall of Fame, with Mahjqa and Nico71 earning a permanent place in the archives. Linus Bohman, the creator of the brilliant LEGO set review aggregator Brick Insights, also joined us here at TLCB Towers – make sure you check out his amazing website via the link above!

Lego Treasure

Advertising; In 2018 we continued to show limited ads via our hosts WordPress, with all profits donated to good causes. This really does mean that your views and clicks here at The Lego Car Blog can make a positive impact – thank you!

So it seems 2018 has been quite a year for The Lego Car Blog too. We’ve added another 442 posts, written 77,060 words, received 260 comments (including 3 threats from Putin supporters), and raised $thousands for those in need.

For 2019 we aim to continue to showcase the very best Lego vehicles from all around the world, review more LEGO sets and third-party products, and bring you the latest LEGO news and exclusive interviews. Until then we’d like to thank you for joining us here at The Lego Car Blog, and we wish you all a very Happy New Year!

TLCB Team

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