Tag Archives: News

Love is a LEGO Brick

Legoland Discovery Centre

Valentine’s Day is fast approaching, and what better way to build (hah!) on your relationship than with an evening of LEGO love!

The Legoland Discovery Centre in Manchester is holding an alternative adults-only Valentine’s Night on Wednesday 13th February, with complete access to the rides, 4D cinema, Miniland, and thousands upon thousands of LEGO bricks!

The centre’s Master Builders will be there holding workshops, there’s speed-dating on the rides (if you’re looking for your compatible brick!), and prizes throughout the night.

To find out more and to book your ‘For the Love of Bricks’ ticket at the Legoland Discovery Centre in Manchester (UK) click the link below!

Legoland Discovery Centre Manchester’s Alternative Valentine’s Night

Legoland Discovery Centre

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334,000-Piece Life-Size Chevrolet Silverado

Lego Chevrolet Silverado

Yup, LEGO have done it again! The latest in a series of life-size replicas (which included a fully drivable Bugatti Chiron don’t forget!), LEGO have added Chevrolet to their list of real-world vehicles built from bricks.

This is the new 2019 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 ‘Trail Boss’ pick-up truck. Well, the one on the left is. The one on the right that looks slightly lower-res is in fact a 334,000 piece full-size LEGO replica of Chevy’s new mid-size truck.

Built by a team of eighteen Master Builders the LEGO Chevy took over 2,000 hours to assemble, measures 20 feet long, 8 feet wide and 6 feet high (exactly the same as the real Silverado), and weighs over 1.5 tons.

Lego Chevrolet Silverado

Commissioned as part of Chevrolet’s tie-up with Warner Brothers Pictures (the guys behind the upcoming The LEGO Movie 2), the brick-built Silverado is currently on display at the Detroit North American Auto Show alongside its more metallic counterparts.

Readers in Detroit (or visiting the Auto Show from further afield) will be able to see the life-size LEGO pick-up at the Chevrolet stand until January 27th, where there’s also a truck-load of LEGO bricks available to play with. For the rest of us not near Detroit but wondering how a 334,000-brick pick-up truck is built, take a look at the video below…

YouTube Video

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The Flickr Photo Snafu

Lego Bigfoot

Flickr?

The Lego Car Blog Elves search far and wide for the very best Lego vehicles that the internet has to offer. Eurobricks, MOCpages, Brickshelf and others all have little Elven footprints across them, but by far the most common source of blog-worthy finds is Flickr.

Previously owned by Yahoo, Flickr – whilst not a dedicated Lego-sharing website like those mentioned above – has proved the default destination for much of the online Lego community, with free image hosting, a mail/message feature, and vibrant community groups.

In 2018 the overlords at Yahoo decided to cash in their Flickr cheque, and sold the site to SmugMug (nope, us neither). SmugMug have wasted no time in redecorating their new house and promptly announced a raft of changes to the site, the chief amongst which is a new 1,000 photo limit for each user.

Uh-Oh Spagetti-O

This new limitation means that from this week many Lego builders will be unable to upload any more images without either opening another account or paying to upgrade to SmugMug’s subscription service. It also means that builders who have already exceeded the 1,000 photo limit will see their images automatically deleted, starting from the oldest.

Lego Bin

Impact on blogging sites

The knock-on effect for sites such as TLCB is that images may be deleted that have been used in past posts, breaking the link to the builder. Our apologies, this means that it’s likely that some links in our past posts will no longer function, and will instead return an error message like this.

Sites that use Flickr to host their images will see any deleted content disappear from their own pages too. The Brothers Brick is one such site where this would have occurred, however they have announced that they will now store all images used in their posts locally, including all past posts – so that even if an image is deleted on Flickr if it’s been blogged at The Brother Brick it will be saved.

What about The Lego Car Blog?

We’re in the fortunate position that all of our images are, and have always been, hosted here – hooray! This means that not a single image will be deleted from TLCB’s archives and that all images blogged here, whether they were found on Flickr or not, are safe.

What next?

We’ll have to see what impact SmugMug’s changes to Flickr have on the Lego community there. Perhaps very little, perhaps a lot, but either way surely the time is right for someone to fix MOCpages…

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2018 | Year in Review

Lego 2019

The Lego Car Blog’s infamous New Year’s Party is fast approaching, so whilst we still have the capacity to write let’s take a look back on the year that was 2018. A cave rescue, a Royal wedding, Facebook douchbaggery, #MeToo, and one Presidential scandal after another, it’s been a busy year!

Stats; The Lego Car Blog passed the 5 million visitor mark a few weeks ago! However as usual we weren’t paying attention and forgot to blog about it. 2018 saw another 900,000 of you joining us here, a roughly 10% drop on the last two years when the site surpassed 1 million visitors per annum.

We mused as to the reasons why this may be a little while back, looking at the rise of Instagram, the fall of MOCpages, and various other factors, but we’ve since realised we’ve written just over 10% fewer posts this year than last. Oops.

Search engines brought just over a quarter of a million visitors to these pages (who knows what they were searching for!), whilst Pinterest and Facebook another 50,000 combined. The rest of you – we assume – came here on purpose, mostly from the United States, with Germany, the U.K and the Netherlands the next post popular.

The Lego Car Blog

Creations; Hundreds of new cars, trucks, motorcycles, aircraft, and the odd spaceship were blogged here at The Lego Car Blog in 2018, albeit around 10% fewer than last year. Top posts were our reveal of LEGO’s new 42083 Technic Bugatti Chiron set, Leviathan’s own Bugatti Chiron creation, and – as always – our Set Review Library, which expanded this year to include the third-party Bluetooth devices SBrick and BuWizz – take a look at what we thought of them via the links.

Lego Master MOCers

Interviews; The Master MOCers series added another two of the world’s finest builders to the Hall of Fame, with Mahjqa and Nico71 earning a permanent place in the archives. Linus Bohman, the creator of the brilliant LEGO set review aggregator Brick Insights, also joined us here at TLCB Towers – make sure you check out his amazing website via the link above!

Lego Treasure

Advertising; In 2018 we continued to show limited ads via our hosts WordPress, with all profits donated to good causes. This really does mean that your views and clicks here at The Lego Car Blog can make a positive impact – thank you!

So it seems 2018 has been quite a year for The Lego Car Blog too. We’ve added another 442 posts, written 77,060 words, received 260 comments (including 3 threats from Putin supporters), and raised $thousands for those in need.

For 2019 we aim to continue to showcase the very best Lego vehicles from all around the world, review more LEGO sets and third-party products, and bring you the latest LEGO news and exclusive interviews. Until then we’d like to thank you for joining us here at The Lego Car Blog, and we wish you all a very Happy New Year!

TLCB Team

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LEGO Technic 2019 | Set Previews!

Hot on the heels of our 2019 Speed Champions line-up preview and the awesome looking Technic 42096 Porsche 911 RSR set scooped here last month, it’s time to reveal the rest of what our Elves found during their traditional Christmastime sneak around The LEGO Company’s HQ. Yup, today we can share the complete H1 2019 LEGO Technic range!

42088 Inspection Lift

Lego Technic 42088 Set

The entry point to the Technic range for 2019, 42088 is aimed at builders aged just 7+, with 155 pieces and a sub-£10 price tag. As has become the norm for Technic sets even at this scale, 42088 features a bit more visual detail than the range has historically used, but pleasingly it still features a lovely crane boom mechanism that utilises a worm gear to provide elevation. A tow truck B-model deploys the parts to achieve the same function and we think either build is a fine way to kick-off Technic for a younger builder.

42091 Police Pursuit & 42090 Getaway Truck

LEGO Technic 42091 Box

Unlike these two…

42091 and 42090 are the usual two pull-back motor powered sets that join the Technic range each year. Like past years they feature absolutely nothing beyond their pull-back motorisation and, like past years, they are somewhat aesthetically challenged, despite the inclusion of a wealth of colourful stickers. Each set contains around 120 pieces and the two models can be combined to create something even more hideous should you feel the need to. 42091 and 42090 will sell very well we suspect, but if you’re going to buy a child an entry point into Technic, you could do so much better…

Lego Technic 42090 Box

42089 Power Boat

LEGO Technic 42089 Set

For less money than either of the two monstrosities above you could have this; a rather excellent looking power boat, complete with a working single cylinder engine that spins the propellor as the boat is pushed along. 174 pieces, some neat stickers, and a hydroplane B-model complete the reasons why 42089 is vastly better than the Getaway Truck and whatever that police thing is supposed to be, and it’ll reach stores in January.

42092 Rescue Helicopter

LEGO Technic 42092 Box

Arriving just in time to rescue countless amateur snowboarders this ski season comes 42092, the only aircraft in the 2019 Technic line-up. With just over 300 pieces, 42092 increases the number of working functions whilst retaining an 8+ target age, with working main and tail rotors, a functioning winch, opening side and tail doors, and featuring the usual colourful stickers. 42092 is also sort-of-mini-figure-scale, and includes a stretcher piece originally found in the Town range with which to evacuate broken snowboarders. A slightly odd jet plane B-model can also be built, but that can’t rescue anyone. Get your hands on 42092 when it lands in January.

42093 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1

LEGO Technic 42093 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1

Continuing LEGO’s genius decision to partner with real-world auto-makers comes 42093, a 579-piece Technic version of Chevrolet’s mighty Corvette ZR1. Working steering and a miniature V8 engine make appearances, and 42093 uses bricks to replicate the Corvette’s shape rather than just stickers (although these are present) which we rather like too. A hot rod forms the B-model and we expect 42093 to cost around £35/$40 when it reaches stores next year.

42095 RC Stunt Racer

Lego Technic RC Stunt Racer 42095

Dropping two-hundred pieces but adding Power Functions motors, an IR receiver, and a controller is 42095, a very weird (but probably very fun) ‘Stunt Racer’. Each of the two large motors separately powers one of 42095’s tracks, giving the model skid-steering and likely excellent cat/Elf chasing ability. A B-model so similar we wonder why LEGO bothered can also be built, and you’ll be able to terrorise your pets for around £75/$80 from January 2019.

42094 Tracked Loader

LEGO Technic 42094 Set

And now for our favourite; 42094 Tracked Loader. With 827 pieces but no motors, 42094 should be good value at around £65/$70 and it includes the most technical sophistication of the H1 2019 line-up. Linear actuators are driven via hand-powered wheels mounted at the rear of the loader, controlling the boom elevation and grabby claw up front. 42094 also includes suspended tracks, a rear winch, a rotating cabin, and a B-model that looks very nearly as good as the main vehicle. 42094 looks to be great addition to the 2019 Technic line-up and may even give that Porsche 911 RSR a run for our money.

Which is your favourite new Technic set of 2019? Let us know in the comments, and you can read our reviews of dozens of LEGO’s past Technic sets via the Set Review Library here.

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Speed Champions 2019 | Set Previews!

LEGO Speed Champions 2019 Sets

A few weeks ago a crack team of The Lego Car Blog Elves were dispatched over the perimeter wall of The LEGO Company’s HQ by way of the office catapult. Tasked with uncovering LEGO’s new-for-2019 sets, those that made it back to TLCB Towers would be revered as heroes, whilst their fallen comrades would be mourned for around 15 minutes, before we all moved on with our lives.

Today the lucky survivors able to out-run a Danish alsatian see the fruits of their courageous mission revealed to you, our readers – and what tasty fruits they are! So without any further pointless preamble, here are the brand new 2019 LEGO Speed Champions sets!

LEGO 75893 Dodge Challenger Demon & Dodge Charger

LEGO’s partnerships with real-world car manufacturers is (and we may be a bit biased given the title of this website), one of their best ever decisions. The sets resulting from the tie-ups to date have been almost universally excellent, so it’s little wonder that LEGO and other manufacturers are looking to partner. Dodge become a new addition to LEGO universe for 2019, joining the likes of Mercedes-Benz, Aston Martin, Porsche, Volkswagen, Ford, Volvo, Ferrari and others.

Their first set is 75893 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon & Dodge Charger RT, a wonderful duel car homage to Dodge’s fastest products. A brilliant classic 1970 Charger (complete with a huge drag-racing supercharger) competes against the brand’s latest 2018 SRT Demon at a drag strip, with three mini-figures and the drag racing ‘christmas tree’ lights included. Each car looks faithfully accurate – although some of that accuracy is admittedly due to stickers, and with just under 500 pieces 75893 looks to be an excellent addition to the expanding officially-licensed Speed Champions line-up.

LEGO 75890 Speed Champions Ferrari F40 Competizione

Next we have a vehicle from one of the first manufacturers to partner with LEGO – it wouldn’t be Speed Champions without Ferrari! With 198 pieces the new 75890 Ferrari F40 Competizione set marks the entry point to the 2019 Speed Champions range, and brings one of the most famous supercars ever made back into LEGO form after its last appearance as the 1,158-piece 10248 Creator F40 set from 2015.

Although considerably smaller than its predecessor, 75890 is nevertheless a brilliantly accurate little set. This version of the F40 is the Competizione, or racing car to you and me, and thus it features a mini-figure racing driver, an all-important spanner, and switchable parts to convert the F40 from race to road. 75890 will reach stores in early 2019 and will be a roaring success.

LEGO 75892 Speed Champions McLaren Senna

LEGO’s third new Speed Champions set brings another previous partner back into the range; McLaren, with their mind-bending track-only Senna. With 219 pieces the 75892 McLaren Senna set is slightly more complicated than the Ferrari above, as is required by the fantastically intricate design of the real car. It’s an aesthetic that doesn’t seem to translate too well to LEGO in our opinion, and – despite what appear to be a few new pieces to help replicate the real Senna’s shape – 75892 looks to our eyes a bit of mess. Nevertheless for McLaren / supercar fans it’s sure to be a winner when it arrives alongside the other Speed Champions sets in January of next year.

LEGO 75891 Speed Champions Chevrolet Camaro ZL1

Chevrolet first joined the Speed Champions range a few years ago and they return to the line-up for 2019 with the 75891 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 Race Car set*. Another single-car set, 75891 brings Speed Champions into the world of NASCAR, although for licensing reasons you won’t find that link anywhere on the box. What you will find are 198 pieces, some of which are uniquely printed, a mini-figure complete with fuel-refill tank and the ubiquitous spanner, and a wealth of stickers to help recreate the ZL1 in LEGO form.

We’ve bemoaned the over-use of stickers rather than bricks to recreate real-world replicas in the past and the same is true here, but LEGO know their market, and also the most cost-effective way to hit the spot aesthetically. 75891 should be hit – especially amongst NASCAR fans!

*Plus an exciting new addition to the 2019 Technic range… but more on that another time!

LEGO 75894 Speed Champions Mini Cooper-S Rally & John Cooper Works Buggy

The fifth and final Speed Champions set new for 2019 brings another old favourite back onto shelves; Mini, with a pairing of the iconic 1960s Cooper-S and a 2018 John Cooper Works Buggy. A tricky thing to make from rectangular bricks, LEGO seem have done a superb job recreating the original Mini in mini-figure scale, and whilst there are stickers present they’re not used to create the shape of the car – bravo LEGO! The classic Cooper comes in rally car spec, complete with quad spot-lights and a roof-rack, and includes a mini-figure rally driver.

The John Cooper Works Buggy isn’t quite as successful, looking not all that much like the real thing. But we’re guessing that if you’re reading this and you’re eight, that won’t matter one bit! Featuring big rubber tyres, a workshop complete with tools, and some cool stickers, if we were eight we’d absolutely love it!

75894 Mini Cooper-S Rally and MINI John Cooper Works Buggy is the largest set in the 2019 range at 481 pieces including four mini-figures and will join the rest of the line-up in stores from January.

Which set is your favourite? We’ll take the classic Dodge Charger and recreate the train-jump scene from the first Fast and the Furious movie, although we’d really need a Speed Champions Toyota Supra to do it properly. Over to you LEGO…

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The LEGO Movie 2 | Full Trailer

It’s been 5 years since Bricksburg was invaded by Duplo monsters, and things have turned very… Mad Max. Opening in cinemas on February 8th 2019, ‘The LEGO Movie 2: The Second Part’ sees Chris Pratt, Elizabeth Banks, Will Arnett and Alison Brie reprising their roles from the first film, with a number of new names joining them for Part 2. Warner Bros has just dropped the full trailer and we can’t wait!

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Teach Old Blocks New Tricks | MBriks Review

Lego MBricks

The fridge. Famed for its ability to look after cheese and various meats, and for many also a glorious blank-canvas for those little magnetic letters used to spell out messages, display children’s artwork, or – if you’re in a student house – communicate extreme profanity. However, for all the fridge’s merits, it has been a resolutely LEGO-free appliance. Until now…

We were recently sent some prototype products that could change the fridge forever (and a bit more besides, but we’ll come on to that). They’re called Mbriks, and they are – simply – a magnet inside a brick, compatible with LEGO, Megablocks and the other various LEGO imitators available around the world. And they’re brilliant.

MBricks Box

Our four Mbriks arrived in a very professional-looking box, complete with a small instruction booklet and the usual health and safety warnings such as ‘Do not eat’ (sorry Elves). Each ‘Mbrik’ measures two studs by two, but aren’t quite a direct replacement for an equivalent LEGO piece as they are fours plates tall, rather than LEGO’s three.

Inside each brick is (we think) a small bag, which contains a loose and surprisingly powerful magnet. This freedom allows the magnet to orientate itself to face whatever is magnetic, and thus means the ‘Mbrik’ can attach to something whatever direction it is placed. A clever trick, and one that is crucial too, as it allows the complete freedom of design of the model in which it will find itself.

Multiple Mbriks can be used in larger models, and whilst they won’t hold a Technic Bugatti Chiron set (although we assume if you had enough of them they might), they will happily hold a Speed Champions scale car. We think parents (and their kids) will love the ability to attach their creations to the fridge, Mbriks’ magnetic picture frames, the car door, or anything else magnetic! But what about you lot reading this?

Lego MBricks

Well we think Mbriks have two equally useful alternate uses. Firstly, for photographing creations. We always advocate clean neutral backgrounds (in fact we won’t blog a creation, no matter how good it is, without decent presentation), and Mbriks open up a world of possibility for bespoke backgrounds. As shown in the picture above, any background could be printed and then used in-between the magnetic surface and an ‘Mbrick’ equipped creation, instantly giving the creation a perfect custom setting for taking photos.

Secondly, Mbriks may open up building possibilities for creations themselves. We love LEGO’s old magnet system from M-Tron and the LEGO Trains lines. They’re super-powerful, compact, and have been used to great effect by builders such as Mahjqa. They are however, a bit tricky to work with, featuring no studs at all, and requiring a unique part to attach them.

Not so with Mbriks, which can be built into a creation just like any other 2×2 brick, albeit one that’s a slightly annoying extra plate tall. Now an Mbrik’s clutch power and colour aren’t quite a match for genuine LEGO pieces, so their placement would have to be slightly more considered, but nevertheless the inclusion of Mbriks could offer builders a whole new way to build creations – not to mention builders at LEGO shows who want help with things, well… not falling over.

Lego MBricks

Whether you’re a parent whose fridge could do with LEGO-ising, a display-builder who’s fed up with things falling over, or a MOCer who’d like to add magnetism to their models, Mbriks offer an interesting solution.

As with many of the third-party products we see in models here at The Lego Car Blog, Mbriks are beginning as a Kickstarter campaign. If you’d like to get your hands on a set of Mbriks you can pledge your support via the link below, and before long they could be featuring in creations here regularly alongside BuWizz, SBrick and others!

Click here to visit the Mbriks Kickstarter 

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We’re 7 Today!

Lego No. 7

Seven. It’s a magnificent number. Continents, seas, days of the week, colours of the rainbow, S Club members, and – somewhat incredibly – the age of this very site!

Yup, seven years ago to the day some clueless and largely incompetent writers decided to start a website for Lego vehicles. Nothing much has changed since then, as we’re still clueless and largely incompetent, but almost five million of you have since joined us for the ride, with visitors from very nearly every country on earth.

Over that time we’ve reviewed exactly one hundred LEGO sets and third-party products in our Set Review Library, interviewed nineteen of the very best builders, set designers and authors from within the Lego Community, and even run a competition or two.

Thank you to each one of you for joining us here at The Lego Car Blog, supporting the vehicle builders whose models fill these pages, and for raising the advertising revenue which is distributed to good causes all around the world.

However, whilst for the last two years we’ve reached a million views per annum, this year we look to fall short. Only slightly, but nevertheless it is a drop.

The internet has changed in the last seven years, with the rise of Instagram and other hosting sites providing other ways for people to view Lego models. Perhaps there are fewer vehicle builders now than there used to be, or maybe people are getting bored of our inane gibberish.

We’ll have to see if year seven marks the beginning of a downward trend, however if in the future it does turn out that The Lego Car Blog is no longer needed to support the Lego vehicle-building community we’ll still be amazed by how many of you have joined us here to read our nonsense. For now we’ll enjoy continuing to write it.

TLCB Team

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The Cog (and 25 Rough Terrain Cranes)

Take four of the most inventive Lego builders (including one TLCB Master MOCer), twenty-five 42082 Technic Rough Terrain Crane sets, and inspiration from Honda’s ‘Cog’, one of the greatest car commercials of all time, and you get one heck of a cool video.

One of the four builders behind LEGO’s brilliant piece of marketing is Nico71, who has also taken 42082 and repurposed it to create an excellent telehandler/wheel-loader ‘C-Model’ using only pieces found within the set. Nico’s model features a motorised tilting and raising fork via LEGO’s Power Functions system, mechanical steering, rear suspension, and all-wheel-drive linked to a V6 piston engine.

Lego 42082 Telehandler

There’s more to see of Nico’s brilliant telehandler at his website, where if you own a 42082 Rough Terrain Crane set and fancy building this C-Model for yourself you can, as Nico has made instructions available too. You can read full details of the model, view the complete gallery of images, and find building instructions via the link above.

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Creations for Charity – More Creations Available!

Creations for Charity 2018

Creations for Charity 2018 is well underway, with over $5,000 raised in the first week to buy LEGO sets for underprivileged children this Christmas! The organisers have now released another tranche of awesome creations to the Creations for Charity online store, including a few vehicles. One of these appears to be Crash Bandicoot from Crash Team Racing, which we’d rather like for ourselves! If you’d like to help this fantastic cause you can check out the creations available to buy by clicking here and you can read full details of the fundraiser via our previous post by clicking here.

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Creations for Charity 2018

Creations for Charity

Creations for Charity 2018 has arrived!

Creations for Charity, the amazing annual fundraiser that provides thousands of LEGO toys to underprivileged children is back for another year! Many of the world’s best builders will be donating creations to the Creations for Charity online store, raising money to purchase LEGO toys for children in need around the world.

You Can Help!

You can join this incredible initiative in a number of ways; by publicising Creations for Charity, donating your own creation, or by buying one of the unique creations for sale via the online store.

Donate a Creation: Donations are now open – if you’d like to give away a creation that you think could raise money to buy LEGO toys for children who may otherwise receive nothing this Christmas then please click here to get in touch with the Creations for Charity team!

Buy a Creation: Click here to see the brilliant creations already donated to the Bricklink store, where each model is for sale with all proceeds used to buy LEGO sets for children in need.

Creations for Charity 2018

Creations for Charity 2018

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TLCB Recommends!

Lego Cheerleader Red

Here at The Lego Car Blog we receive all sorts of requests for endorsements. Frankly this is as surprising to us as it probably is to you, because we’re idiots, but nevertheless somehow we’ve found ourselves in a position of power. POWER!!

We may have got a little over-excited at this realisation but don’t worry, we were brought back down to earth when we asked our intern to pose for the picture above, with the result being a new entry into the Mis-Conduct Box and a picture of a mini-figure instead.

Back to the task in hand, and it’s probably time to assemble some of our recommendations into one handy guide. So here they are, TLCB Recommends….

Third-Party Bluetooth Control | SBrick & BuWizz

We’ve tested two third-party LEGO-compatible bluetooth products here at The Lego Car Blog, and we’re pleased to say that both earn a recommendation.

Best for programming: SBrick

SBrick ReviewReviewed here earlier in the year the SBrick controller provides Lego models with bluetooth capability, allowing control via a mobile phone, gamepad, or other device. This has clear advantages over LEGO’s own IR control, being unaffected by bright sunlight, and allowing the receiver to be completely hidden inside a model.

Where the SBrick really scores though is the superb programmable app, allowing the bespoke set-up of a model that surpasses even LEGO’s own Mindstorms robotics sets. We tried the SBrick with the LEGO Technic 42030 Volvo L350F set and were amazed by how easy it was to set up, and how beautifully controllable the Volvo became. It’s a new dimension in Lego robotics.

Best for power: BuWizz

Lego BuWizz ReviewLike the SBrick above, the BuWizz offers all the benefits of bluetooth control, but with the added bonus of a built in battery that can provide up to eight times the power of LEGO’s Power Functions system. The BuWizz brick can be programmed too, although we found this far more limited than the SBrick’s abilities, but really this product is all about power.

The BuWizz bluetooth battery genuinely transforms what Lego models can be capable of, and whilst we suspect far more axles, gears and pins will break a result, their owners will be having riotously good fun in the process! Read our review of the BuWizz brick by clicking here and see how fast your model can go.

Books | No Starch Press

No Starch PressWe’ve reviewed loads of Lego-themed books over the years and most are really very good. Our favourite publishers are the guys at No Starch Press who have brought several top-quality building books to print, including some authored by builders who have featured on these very pages.

You can find all of the books we’ve reviewed via the Review Library, and you can check out NSP’s current range via the link above.

LEGO Set Reviews | Brick Insights

Brick InsightsOur ever-expanding Set Review Library has become (and this is a rare thing at TLCB) something that we’re quite proud of. With one hundred sets, third-party products and books reviewed to date, a few of which were written by you – our readers – it’s as good a place as any to find out whether that eBay seller really can charge that much.

However our reviews are only written by us lot here at TLCB Towers (plus a few from you) and, as mentioned previously, we are idiots. Better then to trust an amalgamation of many reviews before you make a purchase decision, and the brilliant Brick Insights does just that. Pulling review information from multiple sources (of which we’re one) you can quickly see all the reviews for a particular set, the average, highest and lowest scores and much more.

You can read our overview of Brick Insights by clicking here and you can check out the site itself via the link above. Don’t buy another set without it.

Builders | Wait, what?

Lego MicrophoneYup, because we’ve been interviewing the very best Lego vehicle builders on the ‘net in our ‘Master MOCers‘ and ‘Become a Professional‘ interview series.

If you’d like to know how some of the greatest Lego model-makers create their masterpieces, and very probably learn some useless facts about them too, then head over to the Interviews pages via the links above. We’ll be adding more builders to this Hall of Fame very soon too!

Other Stuff | Blogs, Creation Sharing, LUGs and more

We’ve a whole heap of references worth your clicks to be found in the Directory, including the sources our Elves use to find creations, rival blogs, games, Lego User Groups and Friends of TLCB.

Take a look via the link above, and remember that your clicks and page visits here at The Lego Car Blog directly contribute to worthy causes around the world, as our limited advertising revenue is dispersed to those who need it more than we do, and that’s entirely thanks to you.

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Life-Size LEGO Bugatti Chiron… That Really Drives.

Lego Technic Bugatti Chiron Life-Size

LEGO’s enormous 3,600 piece 42083 Technic Bugatti Chiron is very probably the greatest set in the brand’s already impressive history. Designed with Bugatti themselves and featuring a replica W16 engine and an eight-speed paddle-shift gearbox, 42083 has taken Technic building to new heights.

But what if you had access to another 996,400 pieces and almost 13,500 man-hours? Cue a gravelly-voiced narrator and some overly dramatic music…

Yes LEGO have built their 42083 Bugatti Chiron set for real, and not only that they’ve made it really, actually, genuinely drive too. No glue was used anywhere in the build and the power comes from 2,304 LEGO Technic Power Functions electric motors – the very same ones that you can buy in stores.

Life Size Lego Bugatti Chiron

With a weight of around 1.5 tons and an estimated 5.3bhp and 92N/m of torque, the fully-functioning speedometer aboard the life-size Technic Chiron was unlikely to read anywhere close to the real Chiron’s 260mph+ top speed.

However just to be safe (or because it’s very cool!), LEGO put Le Mans winner and actual Bugatti development driver Andy Wallace behind the brick-built steering wheel for the car’s test run at the Ehra Lessien track.

Life Size Lego Bugatti Chiron

It’s one heck of an achievement and one that’s unlikely to be topped unless LEGO find of way of making a working space shuttle. You can find out more about this amazing feat at LEGO’s Bugatti ‘Build for Real’ website, and you see a rather more home-built attempt at creating a fully-drivable life-size car from LEGO bricks by clicking here.

LEGO Technic Bugatti Chiron Life Size

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It’s a Party in the Sky!

Well we’ve now found our favourite airline safety video! Emmett and Wildstyle are ‘between films’ right now, and thus have time to star in Turkish Airlines’ latest safety instructional. Fasten your seatbelt, stow your tray table, and put your seat and window blind up via the video above!

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