Tag Archives: Creator

Shell Suit

Lego Ferrari F40 GT Shell

This is an ultra-rare Ferrari F40 GT, built from 1991-92 to take Ferrari back into endurance racing. Just seven GT’s were built, each featuring a stripped-out interior, fixed perspex headlights (replacing the pop-up units fitted to the road car) and an engine upgrade to the tune of near 600bhp. That upgrade actually included a restrictor to limit the power produced by the twin-turbo V8 in order for it to meet national championship regulations, the full-fat LM version was rumoured to produce over 900bhp in qualifying trim…

This superb recreation of the 1991 Shell-liveried racer comes from Flickr’s Nuno Taborda, and much like the real F40 GT it’s based on the production version, in this case LEGO’s excellent 10248 Creator set. Nuno has upgraded the set’s bodywork and interior to GT specification, and re-liveried the car in Shell’s iconic white, red and yellow sponsorship.

There’s lots more to see of Nuno’s 10248 modification at his Flickr photostream – click the link above to go GT racing circa 1991.

Lego Ferrari F40 GT Shell

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Travelling Light

Lego Mini Clubman

Before the Mini Traveller, now called the ‘Clubman’, became a larger rebadged BMW 1 Series, it looked like this. This is the van variant, of which over half a million were produced until the early 1980s, but with a payload of just 1/4 of a ton it wasn’t going to trouble Ford’s Transit.

However, the Traveller van was perfect for light-duty work nipping down city streets, which is what Flickr’s Peter Schmid has deployed his to do, delivering pizza for Al Capone’s pizzeria. Based on the official LEGO 10242 Mini Cooper Creator set, Peter has faithfully replicated the van version of the iconic original Mini, complete with the famous twin barn doors at the back.

Place your pizza order at Peter’s photostream via the link above.

Lego Mini Traveller Van

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Not Another Mini

Lego Mini Moke

Well, this is a Mini, but not a normal one. Designed to sell to the world’s militaries, the Mini Moke was an ultra lightweight off-road vehicle built for ease of travel and maintenance. And it did those things pretty well, being based on the standard Mini passenger car and being light enough to be picked up by its bumpers.

However, at the one thing the Moke really needed to do well, the off-roading stuff, it was a bit hopeless. Low ground clearance (and low power) meant the little car got stuck a lot, and even the addition of a second engine in the rear to give the Moke four-wheel-drive failed to convince any major militaries to back it.

Looking for a way to recoup their investment, the British Motor Corporation re-marketed the Moke as a fun car for civilian use, and in a few places – notably Australia, the Caribbean and parts of the Mediterranean – turned their initial failure into a quite a success, and the Moke has now become something of a cult car in these markets.

This lovely Lego version of the unusual Mini, built to match the scale of the official LEGO 10242 Mini Cooper set, has been built by Ritto Aydillo Zuazo of Flickr, and it’s a faithful recreation of the odd original. Ritto is hoping that his Moke replica can become an official LEGO set via the LEGO Ideas platform – to see all the images and to give it your vote check it out on Flickr via the link above.

Lego Mini Moke

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Buy a Mini… Get a Hot Rod

Lego Hot Rod 10242 Alternate

Minis seem to be popping up all over the place here today. Well this isn’t a Mini obviously, but it has been built exclusively from the parts found within the 10242 Mini Cooper Creator set. Like the Porsche 911 RSR featured here earlier today the builder of this 10242 alternate hot rod model has made instructions available, so that if you own the Mini Cooper set you can build your own. You can see more courtesy of Serge S on Flickr.

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Buy a Mini… Get a Porsche

Lego Porsche 911 RSR

LEGO’s 10242 official Mini Cooper set is a firm favourite here at TLCB Towers, but that’s no reason to stick to the prescribed instructions. Suggested to us by a reader, amaman of MOCpages has used the Mini’s excellent parts range to build something just a little bit quicker… Porsche’s monster 911 RSR. There are opening doors, hood and engine lid with a detailed interior an engine inside, and amaman has even photographed the build steps so that if you own 10242 you could build your own RSR too. You can see more of the build and check out how amaman has done it via the link to MOCpages above.

Lego Porsche 911 RSR

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Mazda MX-5 Miata – Picture Special

Lego Mazda MX-5 Miata

We love the Mazda MX-5 / Miata / Eunos here at The Lego Car Blog HQ. Although clearly stealing its exterior styling straight from the 1960s Lotus Elan, and launched with just 110bhp, the first generation ‘NA’ series MX-5 reinvigorated the sports car for the modern age.

Lego Mazda MX-5 Miata

Prior to the little Mazda’s launch in 1989 the small two-seat roadster species was almost extinct. The collapse of the British auto industry which had made most of the world’s roadsters, and the rise of the hot hatchback had seen the sales of sports cars plummet.

And then Mazda came along, with something small, cheap, fun and – uniquely for a roadster – reliable. The MX-5 sold by the boatload, and ensured the survival of the roadster formula as BMW, Porsche, Honda, Mercedes and others rushed to join the newly resurgent sports car market.

Lego Mazda MX-5 Miata

Mazda are now on their fourth generation MX-5 and it’s better than ever, but today we’re sticking with the original, the lovely early ’90s NA. This brilliant Creator-style replica of the first generation MX-5 is a commissioned piece and comes from Flickr’s BrickMonkey, featuring pop-up headlights, opening doors, hood and trunk, and including a detailed engine, interior and even chassis.

Lego Mazda MX-5 Miata

There’s loads more to see at BrickMonkey’s Flickr photostream. Click the link above to take your top off and have some fun in ’89!

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Blue Bug

Lego Volkswagen Beetle 2017

We’re not really fans of VW’s ‘new’ Beetles. Volkswagen are on their second ‘new’ Beetle, yet despite beating both the new Mini and the new Fiat 500 to the market for retro compact cars, the bug seems to lack the charm and fun of either of them.

No matter, because car-building legend Firas Abu-Jaber has brought the fun back with this brilliant GRC-bodykitted 2017 Beetle, made almost entirely from the pieces found within the official 10252 VW Beetle Creator set.

There’s more to see of the 2017 GRC Beetle on both Flickr and MOCpages, and you can read Firas’ interview with us here at TLCB by clicking here.

Lego VW New Beetle

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21307 Caterham Seven 620R Review

Lego 21307 Caterham Seven Review

The Lego Car Blog Review My Set Competition is nearly at an end, but we’ve just got time to squeeze a few more of your Set Reviews in before the competition closes in December. MOCpages’ Marco. qm joins us today with the set that everyone’s talking about, fresh from the LEGO Ideas platform and designed by TLCB Master MOCer Carl Greatrix, it’s the magnificent Caterham 7 620R…

The LEGO Company are known for making strong and resistant sets. Lego Fans are experts in making good-looking cars. When they get together, great things can happen. Things like a LEGO Ideas project that achieved the magical number of 10,000 supporters to gain approval to become an official LEGO set, which in in this case is the Caterham Seven 620R by Carl Greatrix.

Two years ago, on December 2014, Carl’s Seven started its journey on LEGO Ideas, by May 2015 it reached 10,000 votes and finally in March of this year Carl’s design was approved for production as an official LEGO set.

Now let’s talk about the product, the $79.00 brick-built Caterham, or as the builder called it ‘the kit of a kit car’. Although officially licensed by Caterham, 21307 is not a particularly expensive set; it’s $20 cheaper than LEGO’s previous Creator Expert sets and it comes in a nice black box with wider cardboard usual, something that I think is a nice detail.

Upon opening it, you’ll find one instructions book and seven bags of bricks, with the typical larger 1, 2 and 3 numbered bags, plus some smaller bags with the same numbers on them.

Lego 21307 Caterham 7 Review

The moment you start building it you notice how cleverly designed the 21307 set is, with a very rigid chassis and a nicely detailed exterior, it’s a builder’s dream. Upon finishing the first part of the build you’ll already have a strong chassis and the rear fenders completed.

Next you open the bags labeled with a 2 and build the second stage of the car, in which you construct the engine, the seats, the front wheel arches (which by the way are very well designed!) and the exhaust. Basically all you’re missing after this is the nose cone, the hood, the trunk and the wheels. Continue reading

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Ferrari Friday

Lego Ferrari 288 GTO

The Elves have been watching too many ’80s movies again, and thus our recent posts seem to have gone a bit ‘red braces’. Still, no matter, because if the results of their historical television watching are as good as this we’ll happily indulge them.

This is a Ferrari 288 GTO, closely related to (and built alongside) yesterday’s 308 GTS, but with its V8 slightly de-bored (made smaller) and turned longitudinally, to make room for a pair of turbochargers, a pair of intercoolers, and a whole lot more power.

Lego Ferrari 288 GTO

This foray into forced induction delivered some incredible results too, as the 288 GTO was the first production car to reach 300kmh (186mph) – way back in 1984.

This lovely Model Team / Creator style recreation of one of Ferrari’s most legendary models comes from Daniel H of MOCpages, with opening doors, hood and trunk, pop-up headlights (controlled from inside too!), and a detailed interior and engine bay.

Daniel is hoping his creation will become an official LEGO set via the Ideas platform – if you like it you can see all the photos, and add your vote to LEGO Ideas, via the link to MOCpages above.

Lego Ferrari 288 GTO

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Cinquecento!

Lego Fiat 500

LEGO have been doing fantastically well out of their expansion into officially licensed automotive partnerships. Fans love the sets, as they get a real-world car to build, and it’s great publicity for car manufacturers too – a child playing with a LEGO version of their product today may buy one for real when they grow up!

MINI, Volkswagen, Ferrari, Volvo, Porsche, McLaren, and most recently Caterham have all seen one or more of their vehicles recreated in Danish plastic, and the collaboration of saabfan2013 and Gabriele Zannotti would like to add another iconic car to LEGO’s officially licensed line-up.

Lego FIAT 500

This is, of course, the wonderful original Fiat 500 (or Cinquecento in Italian) which saabfan and Gabriele have recreated beautifully in LEGO form. Featuring opening doors, bonnet and engine lid, as well as a detailed interior, this little Fiat looks the prefect companion to the already released MINI Cooper and Volkswagen Beetle Creator sets available to buy today.

If you like it as much as we do you can support the Fiat 500 on the LEGO Ideas platform, whereby your votes could turn this design into an official LEGO set! Add your vote by clicking here, and you can see more of the build at saabfan‘s Flickr photostream by clicking here.

Lego Fiat 500 F

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Historic Hatch

Lego Golf GTI

You don’t need to be the first to do something to receive the credit of invention. Apple have been hugely successful by refining other companies’ ideas and marketing them to the masses, and so too it was with Volkswagen and the hot hatch.

Widely credited with creating the formula, Volkswagen’s Golf GTI was not the first sporty hatchback, but it was the best, and as such is now synonymous with the genre. This neat Creator-style recreation of the iconic car is the work of Hasan Kabalak and there’s more to see on Flickr and Eurobricks.

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31041 Construction Vehicles – Set Review

31041

Come with us on a journey as we review the cheapest set that The Lego Car Blog has ever examined. We thought that we’d have a change from the big Technic sets that usually feature here. At £3.49 (30% off) from amazon will our purchase prove to be value for money? How will it rate for fun and playability? Will the Elves eat most of the 64 pieces before we can use them? Read on…

Packaged in LEGO’s usual bright and attractive box, 31041 scores over a large Technic set by only requiring a strong thumb to open its cardboard tab. None of that cutting or ripping sticky tabs here. Collectors will obviously want to cut the packaging open with a sharp knife in order to preserve its collectability, in a manner similar to this video.  A recurring theme of our reviews is the need for parts to come in numbered bags in order to reduce confusion & sorting and to help make building more pleasurable. Sadly the bag of parts is not numbered, possible as there is only one.  On the up side, a quick flick through the 32 page instruction book reveals that it contains instructions for all three models. As we’ve mentioned in other reviews, it would be great it if LEGO did this for their big, expensive Technic sets too. At the moment, builders having to traipse off to Lego.com and download PDF files.

31041_prod_sec_1488

Moving on to the build, the headline model is rapidly built in 14 pages. The construction is the conventional, studs up type. There’s nice use of commonplace bricks, such as 1×1 round bricks and headlight bricks with 1×1 round plates to give the detailing. There’s also the neat use of a 1×2 tile, at the centre of the model, which will make it easier for children to take apart and re-build (which is what LEGO is supposed to be for!). The backhoe is a conventional bit of building too but the front bucket and its arms, are a good example of economical use of parts to good effect.

Builders young and old can learn quite a bit from this tiny model. As with short stories when compared with novels, micro-scale builds force modellers to consider each and every brick carefully. With model completed, you’re left with a spare 1×1 trans-orange round plate, a dark grey clip arm and three 1×1 light grey round plates to shovel around.

31041_1488x838

In terms of functionality, this is a strong build, which rolls well across a floor or table. Sadly it suffers from the usual problem in LEGO vehicles of having poor Ackerman steering geometry. This is probably due to it having no steering but let’s skate over that one. Both buckets are firmly attached to the body of the tractor and have good ranges of movement. It’s a bit tricky to keep the grey plates on the front bucket, though this can be improved by swapping the corner pieces from the backhoe with on of the 1×2 edge pieces. Overall the model is fun and nice proportioned. It would be great if it had different diameter tyres, fore & aft, like a JCB but that would reduce the flexibility for making other models.

The other two vehicles are strong and fun to build and play with too. The dumper is a particularly nice little model. The way that the rear skip hinges is neatly and interestingly done.

This set is a great little parts pack, with most of the pieces in standard LEGO colours such as black, yellow and grey. There are four, yellow 1×2 curved bricks amongst other useful stuff. It’s also a brilliant, cheap bit of fun for the younger builder in your household: a great addition to that order for the 42055 that you’re buying for yourself (yes, we know, those big yellow rings are essential for your next MOC and it’s the only way to get hold of them). At this price, you could buy three 31041s and build one of each vehicle to use together in a diorama (obviously you wouldn’t be playing with them). Go on, make that investment!

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Creator Volkswagen Beetle 10252 – Set Preview

Lego 10252 Volkswagen Beetle Set 2016

We find it a bit odd that Adolf Hitler’s car for the people became such a hit with peace loving hippy surfer types, but nevertheless if there’s one brand synonymous with surf culture, it’s Volkswagen. LEGO’s partnership with Volkswagen has been a fruitful one too, with the excellent T1 Camper and their previous 10187 Beetle being highlights of their licensing programme.

LEGO had decided to continue this affinity with Volkswagen with their newest Creator release, this superb surf-ready 1960s Beetle. Aimed at ages 16+ 10252 contains 1,167 pieces, including a printed VW logo brick, new fender parts and a new windshield, and features a detailed flat-4 engine, interior, surfboard and cool-box.

We expect the 10252 Volkswagen Beetle set to cost around $100/£70 when it reaches stores in August, and it looks like a sure fire hit!

New 10252 Volkswagen Beetle  Lego Creator

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FORZA LEGO!

Welcome to TLCB’s almost timely review of the latest in a short line of Creator Expert car models…

Lego 10248 Ferrari F40 Review

Looks nice, doesn’t it? Usually in these reviews I open by rambling on a bit about personal experiences with the car in question, but since I’m not a millionaire that won’t happen this time.

Much.

Y’see, I have had the pleasure of inspecting this fine beast up close and in the plastic (the panels are glassfibre!). All you have to do is visit your friendly neighbourhood Supercar dealer. These places are almost always staffed by knowledgeable enthusiasts who sell what they sell because they love it. If they have the time, they’ll happily share it with you, a fellow enthusiast. Just try not to touch the cars they’ve spent ages polishing… Generally, they’re happy to entertain respectful sightseers and you’ll encounter none of the snootiness you might get from the classic boys…

The Ferrari F40 is an amazing thing, and hardly a people’s car like the other Lego Creator sets… except it is. It’s a thing that’s a joy to see (and hear) whether you own it or not. Three cheers for those who do and share them with the world by driving them around! If you ever see one behind you, wind down the window and hope he gives it the berries when he comes fanging past!

So, if you can’t get a real one, is 10248 the next best thing?

At £70 for 1158 pieces it’s better value, certainly… better value than the Mini even, with 80 more pieces for a fiver less. Considering the likely cost of the Ferrari licence, LEGO are being pretty generous here.

The box seems smallish, same size as the Mini’s I think, but it’s simple and uncluttered design is very appealing – it’s just a shame it’s got those destroy-box-here tabs to open it up. Inside, there’s two sets of numbered bags full of mostly small pieces – there’s a lot of detail here – a small sticker sheet that if you’re lucky won’t be crumpled and the single perfect bound instruction book that’s fast becoming the norm in larger sets. And a brick separator, because you can never have too many of those…

Instructions are pretty clear, so long as you realize Lego’s inconsistent representations of dark grey and black result in what could be black parts in the early stages actually being dark grey… Another minor niggle is the usually-helpful highlighting of parts just added occasionally obscures some parts already there, which can create confusion.

No biggie. It’s a fun thing to build, with very little repetition and like the Mini and Camper before it, plenty of interesting techniques and details along the way. I especially like the way they did those NACA ducts on the bonnet and sides. Here’s a fun fact: the duct was developed in 1945 as a way of allowing cooling air in with a minimal disruption to airflow, by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in the US (NACA eventually became NASA when it’s remit expanded just a bit).

I’m a riot at parties…

As for the rest of it, it’s mostly very good, starting with the engine.

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The heart of any Ferrari, of course, and this has had plenty of attention lavished on it. The 2.85L turbocharged V8 isn’t the prettiest Ferrari engine but it ain’t exactly a diesel either… LEGO have done a great job of this, right down to the pistols used as manifold outlets that you can barely even see once it’s in the car.

The interior is simpler to build, mostly because (entirely accurately) there’s very little in it. What’s there is nicely done, although it would be good if the steering wheel’s rake was fixed instead of relying on a pin’s friction to hold it at the right angle. And good luck getting the tiny Prancing Horse sticker on the 1×1 round tile in the centre of the steering wheel! They probably should have printed that…

They probably shouldn’t have printed the rear pillars. This is the only area that lets it down somewhat. Apparently the genius responsible for the camper’s front and the Mini’s A pillar is yet to retire… One issue I have with this solution is the fact that printing in red on a black part results in a darker shade of red, a point that’s not evident from the pictures on the box but does stand out on the model. Also, because the side window / pillar is one big part, the side window lifts up with the rear cover. Any MOCer worth his salt would have bricked this part properly, as LEGO themselves did with the rest of it.

While we’re having a moan, do you ever wish that LEGO would stop unnecessarily redesigning parts? I’m talking here about the 1×6 arches used over the rear wheels that have an awkward little step that isn’t there if you use a couple of older, smoothly curving ones instead. It looks a lot better if you do.

I am now done moaning. I’m not even going to complain about the stickered ducts over the rear wheels, simply because there isn’t a better way that I can see to do this with an opening engine cover in the space available.

The front end is more successful, capturing the form of the F40 in bricks accurately and well. The pop-up headlights are quite neat (you have to lever them up individually yourself using a thin gap at the front – luckily they’ve provided the brick separator you’ll need for this!). The shape of the bonnet is excellent and there’s even a bit of detail under it, including a spanner (what are they trying to tell us about Italian reliability?). While you’re in there you might notice the multicoloured structure of the bonnet’s underside – the only place where the hidden BOLOCsness of this model becomes evident.

And then there’s that windscreen… Manna from heaven for MOCers, surely! Just so long as the car you build with it is red… There’s a slightly surprising omission here, since with a 1×4 black brick right below it at the same angle, a simple substitution provides somewhere to place a wiper. After all, they’ve thought of everything else, including door mirrors that are actually attached to the doors. Hooray!

Despite a couple of visual hiccups, the model as a whole does look pretty good:

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All the panels that should open, do, which we always like to see. The engine cover pivots on an axle so there’s no friction – you’ll need the handy stick provided to hold it up. I guess Ferrari must have done the same.

Aside from opening stuff and peering at detail, there’s no playability here, as with the other cars in this theme, but I’m pretty sure any attempt at stuffing mechanics in would ruin it.

Like the Camper and Mini before it, it exists for display and it looks good enough to do that; it’s one visual flaw not quite enough to detract from the whole.

If you have petrol in your veins you’ll like it. 8/10.

Buy the LEGO Creator 10248 Ferrari F40 set

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Lego Creator 10248 Ferrari F40 Set Preview

Lego 10248 Ferrari F40 Review

Today might have been Clarkson, Hammond and May’s last episode of Top Gear, but LEGO have gone a very long way to cheering up TLCB office…

This is the new 10248 Creator set, and it’s absolutely gorgeous. Following on from the 10220 Volkswagen Camper and 10242 Mini Cooper sets, LEGO have teamed up with Ferrari once more to bring us a stunning brick-built recreation of possibly the greatest car ever made.

Ferrari’s F40 was launched way back in the late 1980s to triumphant acclaim and it became the definitive supercar of the era. Powered by a small 2.9 litre twin turbo-charged V8 shrouded within kevlar and carbon fibre bodywork, the 201mph F40 was the fastest and most expensive Ferrari ever built.

Production lasted just 5 years, during which time around 1,300 units were manufactured. This means that today the F40 is a little too pricey for most of us, but luckily LEGO have the answer…

LEGO’s 10248 Ferrari F40 Creator set arrives in August of 2015 and contains over 1,150 pieces, a few of which are new and unique to the set, including the wheels, tyres and windshield. There’s an opening engine cover to reveal a detailed V8 engine, opening doors, clamshell front section, pop-up headlights and a detailed interior.

Aimed at ages 14+ the LEGO Creator Ferrari F40 won’t be cheap (RRP is estimated to be around $90/£70), but that’s quite a lot cheaper than the real car. Plus you can park it on your desk.

As is often the way a Set Review for 10248 may follow – in the meantime you can remind yourself of the previous iconic vehicles in the Creator line-up by clicking on the links in the text above.

Lego Creator 10248 Ferrari F40 Review

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