Tag Archives: Lamborghini

My Other Supercar’s a Lamborghini

LEGO’s new 42115 Lamborghini Sian FKP37 adds another monumental Technic set to their line-up of real-world vehicles. Even if we hadn’t heard of the actual car and the real set seems to be getting somewhat mixed reviews, thanks in part to the new colour (or rather colours, as it seems to be in reality).

Cue James Tillson of Flickr, who has dissembled his 42115 Lamborghini Sian so fast we suspect he may not have built it in the first place, and used the pieces to create another epic limited-run hypercar, the 2002-2004, 400 unit, 650bhp Ferrari Enzo.

Ferrari Enzos definitely didn’t come in green (or even the various greens that the 42115 set seems to contain), but apart from the colour anomaly James’s Technic recreation is instantly recognisable as Marenello’s most famous product. A working mid-mounted V12 sits underneath the opening engine cover, with the model also featuring realistic inboard suspension, functioning steering, opening scissor doors, and much more besides.

There’s much more of James’s spectacular 42115 B-Model Ferrari Enzo to see at his photostream by clicking here, and if you’d like to enter your own alternate build into TLCB Lock-Down B-Model Competition you still have a few hours left.

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My Others Car’s a Porsche 911 GT3 RS

After revealing the brand new LEGO 42115 Technic Lamborghini Sian FKP 37 (what?) set yesterday, and wishing it was a Lamborghini we’d actually heard of – like a Miura – Flickr’s James Tillson has risen to the challenge with extraordinary timing by uploading his entry into TLCB’s Lock-Down B-Model Competition which is… a Lamborghini Miura. And it’s orange!

Thanks to the 42056 Porcshe 911 GT3 RS brick source, James’ Lamborghini B-Model is as searingly orange as one of the Miura’s actual paint options, and it manages to replicate the real car’s swoopy bodywork rather well too. The model also includes working suspension, functioning steering, opening doors, engine cover and front clamshell, and there’s more to see of James’ excellent alternate on Flickr. Click here to head to James’ photostream, here to read how to enter your own B-Model into the competition, and here to see the prizes on offer!

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Technic 42115 Lamborghini Sián FKP 37 | Set Preview

This is the brand new LEGO Technic 42115 Lamborghini Sian FKP 37, the fourth largest Technic set ever made, and the first officially-licensed Lamborghini to join the Technic range, following sets from Porsche, Mercedes-Benz, BMW, Ducati, and – of course – arch rival Ferrari.

At 3,696 pieces 42115 becomes LEGO’s first 1:8 scale Technic car, with many parts debuting on the set – largely thanks to the very lime green colour and stunning gold wheels, faithfully replicating those on the real Sian FKP 37. Ah, the real Sian FKP 37; we’ll come on to that in a bit…

Before then, the functions. Like LEGO’s other recent Technic Supercar sets 42115 is packed with incredible technical realism, and features a working mid-mounted V12 engine hooked up to an eight-speed sequential gearbox. Eight! In a Technic set.

Now LEGO’s track record on sequential gearboxes isn’t great, with the six-speed effort in the 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 being, well… crap, but hopefully they’ve cracked it with the eight speed in 42115. Working in-board suspension front and rear, functioning steering, all-wheel-drive, opening scissor doors, and a deployable rear wing also feature, all operated mechanically and true to those found on the real Lamborghini Sian FKP 37.

OK, the real Lamborghini Sian FKP 37…. yeh, we’d never heard of it either, and we’re a car blog. With such a fantastic back-catalogue of iconic cars (the Miura, Countach, Diablo, Gallardo, Murciélago, Aventador, amongst others), we find the choice of an ultra-limited run (63 units) yet-to-be-built hypercar an odd one. Particularly as what sets the real Lamborghini Sian FKP 37 apart from the three-hundred other ultra-limited run Lamborghini hypercars that proceeded it is the world’s first production hybrid super-capacitor powertrain. Which of course is impossible to recreate in a LEGO set.

Still, that doesn’t stop 42115 from being a seriously impressive addition to LEGO’s officially licensed line-up, bringing with it a wealth of new parts, LEGO’s fanciest box yet (for those who are into such things), that possibly-awesome-possibly-crap eight-speed sequential gearbox, and a very Lamborghini price tag.

Expect the new LEGO Technic 42115 Lamborghini Sian FKP 37 set to cost an enormous $380/£350 when it reaches stores later this year. We’d have paid that for a Miura…

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Little Lamborghini

The current Eurobricks ‘small car’ competition is delivering our Elves some brilliant Technic creations. This is one of their favourites, because… well, it’s an orange Lamborghini with a racing stripe down the middle of it.

More for our benefit, it’s also got some neat working features squeezed inside it, including a miniature V10 engine driven by the rear wheels, functioning steering via a ‘Hand of God’ mechanism, plus opening doors and engine cover.

Nico Lego (aka Levihathan) is the Lamborghini’s maker and you can see more of his contest entry at both Flickr and at the Eurobricks discussion forum.

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Lamborghini Centenario | Picture Special

This amazing model is a 1:8 scale replica of Lamborghini’s ultra-limited Centenario hypercar, a V12-engined 760bhp celebration of what would have been their founder’s 100th birthday, sold by invitation only to just forty of the brand’s most discerning (read ‘wealthy’) customers.

Unless you’re one of those forty (let us know if you are!) you’ll probably never even see a Centenario, let alone drive one, but today we can offer you the chance to own one for yourself, as yup – this incredible recreation of Lamborghini’s exclusive hypercar can be built at home from standard LEGO pieces (although the model pictured here is enhanced with some 3D-printed rims and bespoke decals).

It comes from T Lego of Eurobricks, who has replicated not just the Centenario’s wild exterior but has also accurately recreated the engineering within too, and has released instructions so can can create your very own Centenario at home. We suspect this might take the total number built a bit above forty…

The bright blue exterior is superbly accurate and includes an opening hood and engine cover, opening scissor doors (controlled by a HOG mechanism), and a raising rear spoiler (also deployed via HOG).

Inside T Lego’s Centenario he’s created an accurate interior with a working steering wheel controlling the front wheels, and a working 7-speed sequential gearbox, controlled via the centre console. A V12 piston engine is turned via an all-wheel-drive system complete with three differentials, whilst all four wheels also feature clever pushrod inboard suspension, making the model every bit as technically advanced as the real car.

There’s much more of T Lego’s spectacular Technic Supercar to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, where you can read full build details, view a video of the model’s features, and find a link to building instructions so you can build your very own.

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Not Everything in the ’70s was Brown

Cars in the 1970s tended to look like this. Or this. Or this. Or this. And then the Lamborghini Countach came along, from space.

Launched in 1974 the world hadn’t seen anything like it, and the car instantly became a cult bedroom wall icon. It’s fortunate however, that most people know the Countach from a poster rather than from driving one, because they would probably be rather disappointed.

Why not stick to this then, Jerac‘s incredible Model Team replica of the 1970s icon. Jerac has captured the Countach’s wild shape to perfection and he’s even made instructions available so you can build your very own. Which means you can own a Countach for the looks without having to drive one, which really is what the car is all about.

Head to Jerac’s photostream via the link above to find of all his superb images plus a link to building instructions too.

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Fast Bricks: Build 6 LEGO Sports Cars! | Book Review

They’re the questions we receive here more than other (apart from your Mom calling to find out if we’re free); “Where can I buy this?” / “Are there instructions?”.

We’ve reviewed a range of books here at TLCB (see here, here, here and here) that aim to answer the questions above, providing parts lists and building instructions to enable readers to create real-world vehicles from LEGO bricks. Today we have another, kindly provided by publisher ‘Brick Monster‘ who have a range of both instructional books and downloadable building instructions available at their website, offering everything from BrickHeadz to dinosaurs.

Fast Bricks: Build 6 LEGO Sports Cars!

Overview: Brick Monster’s latest publication, entitled ‘Fast Bricks’, details the step-by-step building instructions and complete parts lists for six real-world sports and performance cars. Each car is designed to match LEGO’s old six-wide Speed Champions scale which, whilst less detailed than the new 8-wide standard, should mean both a plentiful parts supply and that fewer parts are needed.

The book follows the now familiar format that we’ve come to expect from instructional publications, offering a brief (and really well written) introduction to each car, along with a few key statistics – although in this case they are about the model itself rather than its real world equivalent.

Instructions and Print Quality: The bulk of the book is taken by the step-by-step instructions, which are clear and well laid out. Minor sub-assemblies are used every so often and all parts added are highlighted by a contrasting brightly-coloured outline, which is very nice touch. A ‘Bill of Materials’ ends each section, along with the alternate colour schemes available for each build. Unfortunately we have no images of these available to show here, which is something that Brick Monster should look into so that they can showcase this content.

‘Fast Bricks’ is not the glossiest book we’ve reviewed and nor is it printed in the highest quality, but it’s well suited to its purpose, where ultra high quality paper can actually be a hinderance to following building instructions, however beautiful the product looks. On the other hand one area where higher print quality would have been useful was in the instructions for C8 Corvette pictured on the cover, where the dark blue bricks chosen are hard to distinguish against the black lines that surround them. This is never an issue with official LEGO sets and highlights just how good LEGO are at both designing and mass-producing the building instructions found in their products.

The Models: It’s the Corvette that is probably the best model within the book, although all feature a range of excellent building techniques that newer builders may appreciate learning.

However, unfortunately for us in some cases the builds are not particularly recognisable as the car they are purported to be. We could have ten guesses for the Mazda MX-5 and Lamborghini Huracan and we wouldn’t have guessed correctly, with other models having only a passing resemblance to their real-world counterparts.

It’s a shame, because – whilst not really offering anything new – the layout, instruction designs, descriptions, and parts lists of ‘Fast Bricks’ are all pretty good.

Verdict: We wouldn’t have thought there was a need for yet another building instructions book, however the constant requests we receive here at The Lego Car Blog indicate that – as usual – we know nothing, and there remains a significant interest in step-by-step instructions for models.

We’re not sure that any book is the best medium for providing step-by-step instructions anymore, with digital downloads performing the job just as well, but nevertheless ‘Fast Bricks’ take on the book-based instructional formula is another competently engineered addition, utilising well-judged techniques and instructional designs to walk readers from a pile of LEGO bricks to a finished sports car model. We just wish the models found within it looked a bit more like the cars they’re supposedly based upon.

★★★

Buy your copy of Fast Bricks by Gilad Barlev and Brick Monster here.

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Supercar of the ’70s

If there’s one car that encapsulates supercars of the 1970s, it’s this one. The Lamborghini Countach was, well… basically un-drivable. No visibility, the widest tyres ever fitted to a production car, the world’s heaviest clutch, zero thought to driver ergonomics, and less power than a modern Mercedes-Benz A-Class…

And yet… look at it. Designed by Bertone in 1971 the Countach was produced from 1974 all the way until 1990, whereupon it was replaced by the Diablo, with some 1,800 units built over its sixteen year life. Later cars were ‘improved’ with the addition of wide arches, sills, and a mental rear wing (making the Countach as iconic in the ’80s as in the decade of its birth), but we prefer the early ones like this LP400.

Flickr’s Jonathan Elliott is the genius behind this 7-wide Speed Champions version, putting LEGO’s new canopy part to brilliant use here. In fact seeing as LEGO have a licence to make Lamborghini sets we think Jonathan’s LP400 would make an excellent addition to the official Speed Champions line-up from whence the canopy part came.

Head to Jonathan’s photostream via the link above if you like his Lamborghini as much as we do, where you can see more this model and his impressive back-catalogue of Speed Champions builds.

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Speed Champions 76899 Lamborghini Huracán Super Trofeo EVO & Urus ST-X | Set Preview

LEGO set names just keep getting longer. This is the new Speed Champions 76899 Lamborghini Huracán Super Trofeo EVO & Urus ST-X set, the latest in LEGO’s rather excellent line of officially licensed real-world vehicles. Joining the likes of Ferrari, Mercedes-Benz, McLaren, Jaguar, and Mini, plus VW Group brands Porsche and Audi, Lamborghini (another brand within the Volkswagen empire) are the latest manufacturer to partner with LEGO’s Speed Champions range.

The new set brings two Lamborghini cars to bedroom floors around the world, the marvellous Huracán Super Trofeo EVO and the hideous Urus ST-X. Each model is built in LEGO’s new 8-wide scale, includes a mini-figure driver, and deploys an array of stickerage to add visual realism (or cheat, depending on your point of view), with the Huracán looking rather lovely and the Urus spectacularly ugly, so correct on both counts.

The obligatory start/finish gantry that seems to be included in every Speed Champions set makes an appearance as expected, whilst another 660-odd pieces make up the two cars. 76899 will reach stores imminently, and whilst we do really hate that Urus, adding Lamborghini cars to the LEGO line-up (even if one is a Urus) is a welcome move. More please LEGO!

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Lamborghini Aventador SV | Picture Special

Following Charbel’s superb Technic McLaren 720S published here earlier in the week we now have Italy’s answer. Or one of them at least, as the country is fortunate enough to b home to a pair of top quality supercar makers. The is the Lamborghini Aventador SV, and it’s been recreated to near perfection by TLCB newcomer mihao/lego_bee.

Suggested by a reader and pictured here digitally (we think?), but built for real, mihao’s Aventador replicates the famous supercar’s aesthetic brilliantly in Technic form. Underneath accurate the 1:12 scale exterior is a complete remote control drivetrain formed by two L Motors driving the rear wheels with a Servo controlling the steering. All four wheels feature independent suspension, the head and tail lights work, and the scissor doors, front trunk and engine cover all open.

mihao/lego_bee’s Lamborghini can be seen in more detail at the Eurobricks forum and you can watch a video of the brick-built creation on YouTube by clicking here. You can also vote for mihao’s design to become an official LEGO set via the LEGO Ideas platform, which we think would make an excellent addition to LEGO’s officially licensed (and mostly brilliant) Technic line-up. Find links to add you vote at Eurobricks and YouTube above.

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Perfect Performante

Aaaand we’re back with car! And what a car. This is a Lamborghini Huracan Performante, the track-focussed, more powerful, lighter weight version of the V10 supercar.

This stunning Technic recreation of the Performante comes from newcomer Jerry LEGO Creations who has not only captured the Huracan’s visuals brilliantly in Technic form, there’s a working V10 engine driven by all four wheels, all-wheel suspension with anti-rollbars, working steering, opening doors and hood, and a detailed interior too.

A proper Technic Supercar then, and there’s more to see of Jerry’s spellbinding build at the Eurobricks forum. Click the link above to make the jump.

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Lamborghini Centenario (II)

Following our last post here’s where Lamborghini’s V12 engine really lives. Built to celebrate 100 years since the birth of their founder, the Lamborghini Centenario is a 760bhp ultra-limited evolution of the Aventador, with just 20 coupes and 20 roadsters produced, each at an unbelievable price tag.

More attainable, but no less glorious to look at, is this stunning Model Team version by Lennart C of Flickr. Recreated beautifully with a complete interior, detailed engine, and the Lamborghini’s mad doors, there lot’s more to see at Lennart’s photostream. Join the celebration via the link above.

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Lamborghini Centenario (I)

Lamborghini are best known these days for their wildly-styled V12-engined supercars, but they actually started in far more humble fashion as a tractor manufacturer. Flickr’s Yvan Bourdeau pays homage to their beginnings with this marvellous recreation of one of their earliest vehicles… yet has fitted it with one of Lamborghini’s enormous V12 engines. It’s almost as if he were a TLCB Elf… Head to Yvan’s photostream via the link above and see how quickly you can plow that field….

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Spanish Devil

Lego Lamborghini Diablo

The Lamborghini Diablo. The last mad Lambo before the Volkswagen Group acquired the brand and started building cars that, you know, actually worked. The Diablo wasn’t a particularly good car, but it will probably always be remembered as one of brand’s greats.

Launched in 1990 the Diablo (so called everywhere bar Mexico, where they took exception to the name) was powered by Lamborghini’s existing 5.7 litre 48 valve V12 engine which produced a little under 500bhp, making the Diablo the first Lamborghini to crack 200mph.

Lego Lamborghini Diablo

Over the Diablo’s eleven year production run numerous special editions, updates and drive-train options were released, before the car was finally replaced by the Audi-engineered Murcielago in 2001 – a much better car, but sadly a lot less mad too.

Today we’re remembering the last ‘proper’ (by which we man ‘not actually that good’) Lamborghini thanks to Daniel H, who has recreated the Diablo rather wonderfully in Model Team form. Opening doors, hood and engine cover all feature, and the underside and engine are each as well detailed as the bodywork and interior.

There’s lots more to see of Daniel’s Diablo at both MOCpages and Flickr, where you can also find a link to the creation on the LEGO Ideas platform. Take a look via the links above.

Lego Lamborghini Diablo

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Centenarian

Lego Technic RC Lamborghini Centenario

This is a Lamborghini Centenario, Lamborghini’s birthday present to, er… itself. Whatever, the world is better place for mental Lamborginis, and the Centenario is surely one of their most mental efforts to date.

Just forty Centenarios were produced from 2016-17 to celebrate the would-be 100th birthday of the company’s founder Ferruccio Lamborghini, with each car costing a ridiculous $2.2million. Powered by a version of the Lamborghini’s familiar 6.5 litre V12 producing 770bhp, the all-carbon Centenario is no faster than the Aventador upon which it’s based, but it is vastly more expensive, and it seems in world of limited-production supercars that a high price is almost as celebrated as a high top speed.

Not here at The Lego Car Blog though, so we’ll move on quickly from Lamborghini’s extravagant gift to itself in favour of this, Lachlan Cameron’s spectacular remote control Technic version. Controlled by two SBrick bluetooth receivers, with remote control steering and drive, electrically opening doors, a V12 piston engine, functioning gearbox, LED head and tail lights, and some trick in-board independent suspension, Lachlan’s model is a work engineering mastery.

There’s lots more to see of Lachlan’s Technic Lamborghini Centenario at his photostream plus you can read further details and join the discussion via the Eurobricks forum. Click the links to join the birthday party.

Lego Technic RC Lamborghini Centenario

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