Tag Archives: Lamborghini

White Angles

Back when this TLCB Writer was a boy, LEGO bricks came in exactly three angles; Right, 45°, and Somewhere (half-way?) in Between.

Not so today, where a myriad of wedges are available in numerous widths, lengths, and thicknesses, and it seems previous bloggee Fabrice Larcheveque has deployed every single one of them in his recreation of Lamborghini’s ultra limited-run Reventon.

Inspired by a fellow previous bloggee The G Brix and constructed in 8-wide Speed Champions scale, Fabrice’s Reventon captures the angular aesthetic of the real car brilliantly, and there’s more to see of his collection of wedges here.

Build-a-Countach

Lamborghini have just revealed the new Countach, celebrating 50 years since the original first appeared in concept form and re-wrote the supercar rule book. In looks only of course, as the actual car, when it arrived in 1974, was rather rubbish.

Still, how a car drives is irrelevant when it’s a poster on your bedroom wall, and the Countach fulfilled the bedroom poster brief better than any car before it, or since.

Which makes us rather disappointed that Lamborghini’s ‘new’ Countach looks mostly like every other Lamborghini, and is yet another ultra-limited special edition (just 112 units will be made) costing $2m a piece.

Not that it matters what we think of course, because the new Countach is already sold out.

No, we’ll stick with the old one produced from 1974 until 1990 (by which time it had grown to look rather silly), despite it being a pretty bad car – even by 1970s supercar standards.

Cue Flickr’s barneius, who has recreated one the later (silly) original Countaches – the extravagantly-titled ‘LP5000 Quattrovalvole’ – beautifully in Speed Champions scale.

Clever build techniques are matched by an even cleverer use of black stickers, and there’s more of barneius’s build to see, plus a link to building instructions, at his ‘Lamborghini Countach’ album on Flickr. Click the link above to make the jump.

My Other Car’s a Porsche

No really, it is. Because this amazing Lamborghini Countach 5000 Quattrovalvole is built entirely from the pieces found within the official LEGO 10295 Porsche 911 set.

How Firas Abu-Jaber has managed to turn a vehicle renowned for its curves into one famous for its straight lines has broken every brain here at TLCB Towers, but suffice to say, Firas has absolutely smashed it.

Working steering, an opening front trunk, engine cover and scissor doors, plus a detailed interior all feature, and there are more superbly presented images of Firas’s incredible 10295 alternate to see at his ‘Lamborghini Countach’ album here.

You can also find further details and building instructions at Firas’s excellent website Bricks Garage, plus you can check out his interview here at TLCB to learn how he builds models like this one by clicking these words.

Life-Size LEGO Lamborghini

The LEGO Technic 42115 Lamborghini Sián FKP 37 set brought a hypercar we’d never heard of to the Technic line-up, complete with a mid-mounted V12, 8-speed sequential gearbox, and nearly 3,700 pieces, many of which were varying shades of bright lime green.

Following their 1:1 scale McLaren Senna, Bugatti Chiron, and Fiat 500, LEGO have life-sized their flagship 42115 Technic set, creating this astonishing 400,000 piece full-size replica of Lamborghini’s wild hybrid hypercar.

Sitting on genuine Lamborghini Sián wheels, this life-size LEGO replica took a team of fifteen model makers over 8,500 hours to design and build, which – besides just twenty bespoke pieces – uses only genuine LEGO parts.

These have been spray-painted (a life-size LEGO first), by Lamborghini’s own painter, perhaps to give it a uniform colour unlike the 42115 set…

The result is a spectacular 2.2 ton homage to Lamborghini’s limited-run hypercar, joining an already impressive line-up of life-size LEGO vehicles. You can check out all of the 1:1 scale LEGO models to appear here at The Lego Car Blog via the link above, and you can jump to the official 3,700-piece 42115 Technic Lamborghini Sián set available to buy in stores (on sale at the time of writing) by clicking here.

Bull Fight

If you’re seven (or a TLCB Elf), then citrus-coloured Lamborghinis are the best thing ever. This post is for you!

Built by The G Brix of Flickr, these two awesome Speed Champions Lamborghini Murcielagos appeal to the seven year old in all of us (which isn’t hard to find in the psyche of the average TLCB writer).

Coming in standard (yellow) and SV (orange) flavours, G Brix’s models deploy some brilliant building techniques to successfully recreate the Murcielago’s distinctive hexagonal shapes, plus there are detailed engine bays under opening covers and each car can fit a pair of mini-figures side-by-side.

Pander to your inner seven year (or your actual seven year old if you are in fact seven) via The G Brix’s photostream.

Small-Scale Sixties Sunday

We had a three-way Elf fight here at TLCB Towers today, as a trio of intrepid internet investigators returned with three sixties classics. This inevitably led to a fight over whose was best, but as all three are being blogged they’re all winners, much a like a pre-school sports day.

The first of today’s small-scale replicas is 1968 Mercury Cougar, in a rather fetching turquoise. Regular bloggee Jonathan Elliott is the builder and there’s more to see at his photostream.

Our second sixties classic is rather more exotic, being the first miid-engined supercar and arguably Lamborghini’s finest hour, the magnificent Miura. Moritz Ziegler is the builder behind this excellent orange Speed Champions recreation and there’s more to see at the link.

The final car in today’s trio steps down from Speed Champions to Town scale, yet somehow manages to be even more detailed.

Built by 1saac W, this brilliant late ’50s to early ’60s Nash Metropolitan is a refinement of a previously blogged build, enhanced with some clever chrome stickerage and really rather clever roof design.

There’s more to see of 1saac’s updated Nash via the link above, plus you can see the appearance of the original, which includes the backstory of this unusual car, by clicking here.

The Countach Conundrum

Crap cars come in all shapes and sizes. This is one of them.

The Lamborghini Countach was like nothing else on earth when in arrived in 1974. It was almost un-drivable, miserable to be in, but it looked fantastic. And then the ’80s came around…

The era of excess threw everything it had at Bertone’s pioneering design, and by ‘everything’ we mean ‘a butt-ton of plastic’.

Widened arches, sills, bumpers, and an enormous yet aerodynamically pointless rear wing turned the Countach into some sort of caricature of itself, ruining the original design and making the car even less usable than it was before.

You’d have to be an obnoxious tasteless moron to like the ’80s Countach, so outlandish, over the top, and borderline unusable had it become. Which is why this TLCB writer absolutely loves it.

It’s this version of Lamborghini’s icon that was suggested to us by a reader, who has photographed his finished build of Rastacoco’s Countach LP5000 QV, which is available on Rebrickable with downloadable instructions.

Rastacoco’s design replicates the ’80s Countach superbly, with the model including opening scissor doors, a detailed interior, and the most perfectly replicated exterior we’ve seen built in brick form yet.

Images of Rastacoco’s model in black, white and red can be found at Bricksafe, with full details, building instructions, and the images supplied by a reader used in this post available on Rebrickable here.

Lamborghini SC18 Alston | Picture Special

Lamborghini have built more special editions than your Mom’s had KFC Bargain Buckets. This is another one that no-one in TLCB Office had heard of, the SC18 Alston.

Based on an Aventador, just one SC18 Alston was built to fulfil a single (and very bespoke) customer order, engineered under the supervision of Lamborghini’s motorsports division. Parts from the Huracan Super Trofio EVO and Centenario were used, alongside several parts unique to the car.

The result was another one-off Lamborghini, and – with such limited information available – a nightmare for anyone trying to recreate it from LEGO bricks.

That’s hasn’t stopped Noah_L though, who has not only managed to recreate the SC18 Alston, he’s absolutely nailed it.

Using building techniques that look like they required a degree in quantum mechanics, Noah has successfully replicated the SC18’s wild exterior to perfection, even gradually increasing the model’s width by a single stud down the length of the car. Scissor doors, a detailed engine bay under an opening engine cover, and a realistic interior complete the build.

An extensive gallery of stunning imagery is available to view on Flickr, and you can see more of Noah’s beautifully presented Lamborghini SC18 Alston by clicking here.

Pre-SUV

With the world’s luxury auto makers seemingly in competition to produce the most hideous, obnoxious, and enormous SUV (see here, here, here, and here), we’re going back to a time when a fast family car didn’t need to be the size of Belgium.

This is the Lamborghini Espada, a four-seat grand tourer powered by a 3.9 litre V12, and produced from 1968 to ’78. It was successful too, being Lamborghini’s best selling model until they decided to keep making the Countach for three decades.

This brilliant Speed Champions version of the Espada comes from regular bloggee Jonathan Elliott, who has recreated Lamborghini’s ’70s family car beautifully in 7-wide form.

There’s more of the build to see at his photostream, along with a host of other excellent Speed Champions cars – click the link above to make the jump.

Rambo Lambo

The Urus is not Lamborghini’s first SUV. But it is their ugliest, which is something we suppose. No, back in the late 1980s, the maddest of all the car manufacturers decided to do something even madder than usual, and built a military-grade, V12 engined off-roader.

Nicknamed the ‘Rambo Lambo’ (younger readers, ask your parents), the LM002 featured the 5.2 litre engine from the Countach up front, although if you liked to literally burn money you could order the LM002 with Lamborghini’s 7.2 litre engine that had – up until that point – been reserved for Class 1 offshore powerboats.

A tubular frame with riveted aluminium panels, all wheel drive, 169 litre fuel tank, and specially developed Pirelli run-flat tyres designed specifically for use on hot sand where also included, which gives a clue as to who Lamborghini was pitching the LM002 at.

However even if you’e not an oil sheik, you can still own a Lamborghini LM002, courtesy of previous bloggee filsawgood and this spectacular fully RC Technic recreation.

Powered by four L Motors with Servo steering, filsawgood’s incredible Technic replica of Lamborgini’s wildest car can be controlled via bluetooth thanks to a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery, which can also up the power to the motors by a factor of eight versus LEGO’s own Power Functions battery.

All-wheel-drive with planetary hubs, independent suspension, opening doors and hood, a brilliantly detailed interior, and a V12 piston engine all feature, and there’s more to see of filsawgood’s astonishing Lamborghini LM002 on Flickr via the link above, where yes – a link to instructions can also be found!

Yellow Devil

Is there anything more supercar-y than a yellow Lamborghini Diablo? Suggested by a reader (and previous bloggee themselves), this one comes from newcomer Attila Gallik of Flickr, who has done an excellent job recreating Lamborgini’s 1990s supercar in Speed Champions form.

Available in both GTR (giant wing) and standard specification, Attila’s Diablo can fit two mini-figures inside and includes a detailed engine underneath the opening rear cover, and if you fancy one for yourself instructions are available too! Take a look via the link above to see more.

Brick Bull

Lamborghini, like Volkswagen’s other brands Audi, Porsche, Ducati, and… er, Volkswagen, are now officially partnered with LEGO. Unfortunately so far the cars they’ve chosen to recreate in the brick are the butt-ugly Urus and a hypercar we’ve never heard of. We’d much rather see an Adventador set, particularly if – like today’s model – it’s orange.

Suggested by a reader this is David Elisson‘s Lamborghini Aventador and it is almost ridiculously accurate for its size. A myriad of complex techniques have been deployed to recreate the Aventador’s wild shape (just look at that windscreen surround!) and it is – as you can see here – really very orange indeed.

There’s more to see of David’s stunning Speed Champions Lamborghini at his photostream – take a look via the link above.

My Other Supercar’s a Lamborghini

LEGO’s new 42115 Lamborghini Sian FKP37 adds another monumental Technic set to their line-up of real-world vehicles. Even if we hadn’t heard of the actual car and the real set seems to be getting somewhat mixed reviews, thanks in part to the new colour (or rather colours, as it seems to be in reality).

Cue James Tillson of Flickr, who has dissembled his 42115 Lamborghini Sian so fast we suspect he may not have built it in the first place, and used the pieces to create another epic limited-run hypercar, the 2002-2004, 400 unit, 650bhp Ferrari Enzo.

Ferrari Enzos definitely didn’t come in green (or even the various greens that the 42115 set seems to contain), but apart from the colour anomaly James’s Technic recreation is instantly recognisable as Marenello’s most famous product. A working mid-mounted V12 sits underneath the opening engine cover, with the model also featuring realistic inboard suspension, functioning steering, opening scissor doors, and much more besides.

There’s much more of James’s spectacular 42115 B-Model Ferrari Enzo to see at his photostream by clicking here, and if you’d like to enter your own alternate build into TLCB Lock-Down B-Model Competition you still have a few hours left.

My Others Car’s a Porsche 911 GT3 RS

After revealing the brand new LEGO 42115 Technic Lamborghini Sian FKP 37 (what?) set yesterday, and wishing it was a Lamborghini we’d actually heard of – like a Miura – Flickr’s James Tillson has risen to the challenge with extraordinary timing by uploading his entry into TLCB’s Lock-Down B-Model Competition which is… a Lamborghini Miura. And it’s orange!

Thanks to the 42056 Porcshe 911 GT3 RS brick source, James’ Lamborghini B-Model is as searingly orange as one of the Miura’s actual paint options, and it manages to replicate the real car’s swoopy bodywork rather well too. The model also includes working suspension, functioning steering, opening doors, engine cover and front clamshell, and there’s more to see of James’ excellent alternate on Flickr. Click here to head to James’ photostream, here to read how to enter your own B-Model into the competition, and here to see the prizes on offer!

Technic 42115 Lamborghini Sián FKP 37 | Set Preview

This is the brand new LEGO Technic 42115 Lamborghini Sian FKP 37, the fourth largest Technic set ever made, and the first officially-licensed Lamborghini to join the Technic range, following sets from Porsche, Mercedes-Benz, BMW, Ducati, and – of course – arch rival Ferrari.

At 3,696 pieces 42115 becomes LEGO’s first 1:8 scale Technic car, with many parts debuting on the set – largely thanks to the very lime green colour and stunning gold wheels, faithfully replicating those on the real Sian FKP 37. Ah, the real Sian FKP 37; we’ll come on to that in a bit…

Before then, the functions. Like LEGO’s other recent Technic Supercar sets 42115 is packed with incredible technical realism, and features a working mid-mounted V12 engine hooked up to an eight-speed sequential gearbox. Eight! In a Technic set.

Now LEGO’s track record on sequential gearboxes isn’t great, with the six-speed effort in the 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 being, well… crap, but hopefully they’ve cracked it with the eight speed in 42115. Working in-board suspension front and rear, functioning steering, all-wheel-drive, opening scissor doors, and a deployable rear wing also feature, all operated mechanically and true to those found on the real Lamborghini Sian FKP 37.

OK, the real Lamborghini Sian FKP 37…. yeh, we’d never heard of it either, and we’re a car blog. With such a fantastic back-catalogue of iconic cars (the Miura, Countach, Diablo, Gallardo, Murciélago, Aventador, amongst others), we find the choice of an ultra-limited run (63 units) yet-to-be-built hypercar an odd one. Particularly as what sets the real Lamborghini Sian FKP 37 apart from the three-hundred other ultra-limited run Lamborghini hypercars that proceeded it is the world’s first production hybrid super-capacitor powertrain. Which of course is impossible to recreate in a LEGO set.

Still, that doesn’t stop 42115 from being a seriously impressive addition to LEGO’s officially licensed line-up, bringing with it a wealth of new parts, LEGO’s fanciest box yet (for those who are into such things), that possibly-awesome-possibly-crap eight-speed sequential gearbox, and a very Lamborghini price tag.

Expect the new LEGO Technic 42115 Lamborghini Sian FKP 37 set to cost an enormous $380/£350 when it reaches stores later this year. We’d have paid that for a Miura…