Tag Archives: Remote Control

Tanker Truck Tribute

Last month we had the tremendously sad job of reporting the news that previous bloggee and legendary truck builder Ingmar Spijkhoven had lost his fight with motor neurone disease. This debilitating disease has no cure, with most sufferers living no more than 5 years from diagnosis. For Ingmar and the thousands of other sufferers there is – at the moment – only one outcome.

Ingmar was unable to visit Lego events towards the end, so his fellow Dutch builders decided to build tribute models to him for the Legoworld 2019 show, an idea he apparently loved.

One such tribute was built by fellow truck builder Bricksonwheels, who took one of Imgmar’s superb trailer designs and added a wonderful Peterbilt 389 truck, chroming each model beautifully and equipping the truck with Power Functions motors and SBrick bluetooth remote control.

Ingmar sadly died a week before the model was completed, but it will be shown at Legoworld alongside the other tributes to him in a dedicated area.

You can see more of Bricksonwheels’ stunning tanker truck tribute to one of the Lego Community’s greatest builders by clicking here, and you can help to change the inevitable outcome of motor neurone disease diagnosis by donating to the research that is underway to find cure.

ALS Association | MND Association

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Bending Bricks

The Elves are happy today. Firstly this huge remote control truck is orange, so it’s already off to a winning start, and secondly it can fit a gaggle of them in the back to ride around the office, and only a few got run over.

This unique machine comes from Waler of Brickshelf, who designed and built it for his engineering diploma thesis. Waler’s design allows his truck to articulate in the middle in two dimensions, both left/right and up/down. To accomplish this Waler’s truck includes a cleverly-constructed pivoting differential, kind of like a helicopter’s swash plate, that can deliver power whichever way the the two halves of the truck are pointing.

The truck is steered by two linear actuators that swing the chassis around a central pivot point which – as it can also pivot vertically – allows for insane articulation. All-wheel-drive, a remotely operable gearbox, all-wheel-suspension, and custom 3D-printed differentials complete the drivetrain, upon which a simple removable body is mounted.

There’s a whole lot more to see, including the clever central pivot design, custom diffs, and on-location photos showing the truck off-road, at Waler’s Brickshelf gallery. Click the link above to make the jump.

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BuWizz Updated

BuWizz

Regular readers here at The Lego Car Blog will have seen a few non-LEGO words appearing every so often in the descriptions of featured models. One of these is BuWizz, a third-party LEGO-compatible bluetooth control and battery that delivers a huge jump in power to LEGO’s Power Functions components and provides remote-control-by-mobile functionality.

We reviewed the BuWizz brick and came away impressed, particularly with the power increase (because who doesn’t want more power!?), but one area where the device could be considered lacking was its app, which was clear and easy to use but nowhere near as programmable as its chief rival SBrick.

BuWizz’s latest update aims to rectify that with the addition of a suite of new functionality including increased customisation, more profiles, advanced power control options, livestream camera support, and a new user interface.

If you already own a BuWizz brick you can download the new app via the last link above, and if you’re yet to try the product you can find out more via the first, where there is also currently 20% off in the BuWizz Summer Sale.

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Lamborghini Aventador SV | Picture Special

Following Charbel’s superb Technic McLaren 720S published here earlier in the week we now have Italy’s answer. Or one of them at least, as the country is fortunate enough to b home to a pair of top quality supercar makers. The is the Lamborghini Aventador SV, and it’s been recreated to near perfection by TLCB newcomer mihao/lego_bee.

Suggested by a reader and pictured here digitally (we think?), but built for real, mihao’s Aventador replicates the famous supercar’s aesthetic brilliantly in Technic form. Underneath accurate the 1:12 scale exterior is a complete remote control drivetrain formed by two L Motors driving the rear wheels with a Servo controlling the steering. All four wheels feature independent suspension, the head and tail lights work, and the scissor doors, front trunk and engine cover all open.

mihao/lego_bee’s Lamborghini can be seen in more detail at the Eurobricks forum and you can watch a video of the brick-built creation on YouTube by clicking here. You can also vote for mihao’s design to become an official LEGO set via the LEGO Ideas platform, which we think would make an excellent addition to LEGO’s officially licensed (and mostly brilliant) Technic line-up. Find links to add you vote at Eurobricks and YouTube above.

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Proper PROFA Off-Road

This is a Tatra T813 8×8 PROFA trial truck and it’s epic. Yes, we just dropped the most over-used word on the internet, but we’re sticking with it.

These amazing machines can traverse just about anything, with this one being run by Team Jansa in European Truck Trial events. Well not this one, because this is a fully functional remote control recreation of the real deal, powered by a total of nine motors, two SBricks and with some of the coolest suspension we’ve ever seen.

It comes from Technic-building legend Madoca 1977 whose work has appeared here numerous times over the years. His latest truck evolves a previous design with more power, more weight, and more off-road capability. Six L Motors drive all eight wheels, whilst two Medium Motors pivot the front four. A third Medium Motor operates a high/low range gearbox, with all of that controllable via bluetooth thanks to a pair of SBricks.

Finally there’s a V12 piston engine mounted under the cab, which is accessible through opening doors and front hatch. It’s an incredibly well engineered creation and there’s more to see of Madoca’s Tatra T813 8×8 (including a video of it in action) at the Eurobricks forum and on ReBrickable, where a parts list and yes – instructions – are available!

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Trucking Fast

Racing trucks are, to our eyes, completely pointless. Totally unsuited to motorsport and hampered by regulations that state they still need a fifth-wheel (as if they’re ever going to tow anything!), they’re only really worth watching for the inevitable crashes. But that’s not to say they aren’t impressive, because they are. Hugely so, with upwards of a thousand horsepower.

Equally impressive (maybe) is this, Lucio Switch’s ‘Race Truck MkII’, a spectacularly smooth Technic replica of a European racing truck, complete with some serious power of its own. LEGO’s discontinued buggy motors are the most powerful the company has ever made and Lucio’s creation has two of them. And two BuWizz bluetooth bricks, each multiplying that power by a factor of eight.

A Servo Motors controls the steering, and model also features working suspension front and rear, opening doors, a tilting cab, and an inline six-cylinder piston engine. It’s also, as you can see here, presented beautifully – giving a perfect demonstration of how to photograph and edit a Lego build. There’s much more of Lucio’s brilliant model on Flickr, including images of the chassis and drivetrain, at the Eurobricks forum where there is also a video of the model in action, and at Lucio’s own website.

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Marion 5760 ‘The Mountaineer’ | Picture Special

This might just be the most impressive thing you’ll see today. Yes, even more so than whichever bottle cap challenge video has gone viral. This is the Marion 5760 mining shovel known as ‘The Mountaineer’, the first giant stripping shovel ever built and still the eighth largest to be constructed.

Completed by the Marion Power Shovel Company in 1956 The Mountaineer had an operating wight of 2,750 tons, working until 1979 before its scrapping a decade later. This spectacular fully functional 1:28.5 scale Lego replica of the 5760 is the work of Beat Felber of Flickr, powered by nearly twenty electric motors, with twenty-two pairs of LED lights, and controlled by several SBrick bluetooth bricks.

Weighing an estimated 35kgs (over 5kgs of which is steel ballast), Beat’s incredible machine can move and work just like the real thing. Each of the four crawling bogies is powered by a separate Medium Motor, with eight tracks being driven in total. These are steered by four linear actuators driven by another pair of motors, whilst another seven power the huge digging arm’s ‘crowd motion’, ‘swing gear’ and bucket. The drum hoist requires a further four XL Motors on it’s own, whilst a final micro motor powers a little passenger elevator that moves between The Mountaineer’s three floors.

Beat hasn’t just stopped with working functionality though, giving his creation a wonderfully detailed appearance afforded by its immense size, with hundreds of tiles and plates covering every surface to smooth the aesthetics, accurate railings, stairways, machine rooms, control rooms and cabins, plus authentically recreated decals to replicate the shovel’s original livery.

The’s much more to see of Beat Felber’s astonishing Lego recreation of the Marion 5760 on Flickr, where almost twenty superb images are available to view, each of which contains an in-depth description of the build. Head to Beat’s Marion 5760 ‘The Mountaineer’ album by clicking this link to Flickr, and see just how brilliant a LEGO creation can be!

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They See Me Crawlin’

This is a remote control 4×4 rock crawler and it comes from previous bloggee Technic BOOM. If you’re a regular reader of this dilapidated corner of the ‘net you might now be expecting a tale of mass Elven destruction, corridor smushings, and even a trip to the ‘Elf Hospital‘.

However the clue is in the title with this post, as Technic BOOM’s creation is one of the slowest that we’ve ever encountered. This inevitably enraged the Elf that discovered it, unable as it was to inflict mayhem on its fellow Elves, but it also means that BOOM’s model is ridiculously capable off-road.

With gearing of 9:1, enormous non-LEGO RC tyres, remote control drive, steering, and differential lockers, Technic BOOM’s rock crawler can inch its way over almost anything. Very slowly.

There’s more to see of this superbly engineered machine on both Flickr and at the Eurobricks discussion forum, where you can also watch a video of it doing its thing on-location off-road.

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Squashed in Space

After today’s earlier build we’re back to the usual TLCB nonsense and mayhem with this, a ‘multi-purpose all-terrain vehicle’ built by LXF and found by one of our Elves on Brickshelf. Despite the mini-figure in the cockpit LXF’s model is a Technic one, with a suite of remote control goodies inside too. Each track is powered by a separate LEGO Buggy Motor, whilst the single rear wheel steers via a Medium Motor. Those three motors are hooked up to a third party BuWizz brick, allowing not only Bluetooth control but also delivering eight times the power of LEGO’s own Power Functions battery.

If you’re thinking that sounds like a recipe for Elves getting squashed you would be right, as those caught at ground level stood no chance once this came hooning down the corridor. Thanks BuWizz…

We’ve now got to get some Elves (and their various bodily fluids) out of the carpet, so whilst we do that you can check out all the images of LXF’s mad creation on Brickshelf via the link in the text above.

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Chevrolet Silverado K30 Crew Cab | Picture Special

Here at The Lego Car Blog we’re not usually fans of American pick-up trucks. This is because they are, by and large, complete crap. However – and we appreciate there is little logic to this whatsoever – old American pick-up trucks, even though they’re still complete crap, are somehow becoming rather cool. This is one such ageing pick-up, the Chevrolet Silverado K30, in dually crew cab specification.

Perhaps it’s because as vehicles get older we’re willing to overlook their shortcomings, but we really want this truck. The Elves do too, seeing as it’s a giant tasteless 4×4. Fortunately for one of them, it did get its grubby little claws on this, as it found this rather impressive Technic recreation of the classic(?) Silverado K30 crew cab by previous bloggee filswagood on Flickr.

A few of the other Elves in TLCB Towers soon got to experience it too, but not in the way they hoped, as it ran them down in the corridor. Power Functions remote control drive and steering combined with bouncy suspension enabled filsawgood’s Chevy to comfortably squash a couple of our little workers before we took the controls away to take a look for ourselves.

And look we did, because filsawgood’s Silverado is a brilliantly-engineered build, not only featuring the aforementioned (and excellent) remote control drivetrain, but also opening doors, hood (under which is a detailed engine), tailgate, and toolbox (battery compartment), plus the model includes LED lights and a detailed interior too.

There’s much more of filsawgood’s superb Chevrolet Silverado K30 crew cab to see at his Flickr album by clicking here, and you can check out filsawgood’s other Technic 4x4s to appear here at The Lego Car Blog by clicking this bonus link.

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LEGO Technic H2 2019 | Set Previews!

Our Elves have been sneaking! Following our reveal of the H1 2019 Technic sets another batch of Elves were dispatched to The LEGO Company’s HQ to uncover the H2 additions to the Technic line-up. The survivors returned home over the summer and after much consideration we’re now able to offer our ‘expert analysis’ of LEGO’s latest sets! So, here you go, the H2 2019 LEGO Technic line-up…

– 42098 Car Transporter –

There’s a theme running through the H2 2019 Technic range and, much like your Mom, it’s size. We’ll start with the largest. Or longest at least. This is the 2,500 piece, 3ft long 42098 Car Transporter, a vehicle type that LEGO have dabbled with in the past in the Technic range, but never really tackled properly.

Three models in one, 42098 includes a truck, trailer and a muscle car, all of which are packed with mechanical functions like Technic-of-Old. The aesthetics are very much Technic-of-New though, with plenty of stickers and an increased level of visual realism.

42098 can fit five cars on board by our count, leaving room for four of your own once built. Both the truck and muscle car feature ‘Hand of God’ steering and miniature working piston engines, whilst the truck and trailer include ingenious hand-powered mechanisms to access the top decks, with gears lowering and extending a multitude of ramps to enable a full load to be driven on board.

42098 looks like a really interesting addition to the Technic range, and it’ll be nice to be able to store other sets and MOCs neatly on top of it. Expect the new set to cost c$180/£140 when it reaches stores later this year.

– 42099 4×4 X-treme Off-Roader –

Next we have a set that’s got the Elves very excited. It’s huge, it’s orange, it’s remote controlled, and it features LEGO’s penchant for poor spelling when words contain the letter ‘x’.

The 42099 X-treme Off-Roader looks… well, nuts, and it features LEGO’s new bluetooth remote control, finally catching up with third-party providers such as SBrick and BuWizz who have been offering control-via-phone for some time.

Like the 42098 Car Transporter above, 42099 is a complicated set aimed at ages 11+, but this time it swaps mechanical functionality for LEGO’s Power Functions motor system, now with the addition of the new ‘Control’ bluetooth-compatible app-based operating system.

This gives 42099 superb-looking playability, provided the set’s all-wheel-drive, remotely controlled steering, and suspension are up to the job. Judging by the images we’re hopeful, and if the number of stickers is a measure of off-road ability, the X-treme Off-Roader will be able to climb Everest.

Like all the sets previewed here 42099 will reach stores later this year. We’ll do our best to resist testing its Elf-smushing ability when we get our hands on it…

– 42097 Compact Crawler Crane –

The last H2 2019 Technic set we’re previewing today (but not the last in the range…) is this, the 920 piece 42097 Compact Crawler Crane. Featuring an all-mechanical array of functions including boom extension and raising, four spidery legs that use the huge stabiliser parts from the 42078 Mack Anthem set reviewed here earlier in the year, a winch, and a set of manual tracks, it looks like no crane we’ve ever seen but contains some excellent gear-driven functionality nonetheless.

Still towards the top of Technic’s age range, 42097 is aimed at ages 10+ and will cost around $100/£80, making the H2 2019 line-up one of considerable size and complexity, earning LEGO a few TLCB Points after a slightly lacklustre H1 range.

There’s one more set in the H2 2019 line-up left to reveal, and we’ll do just that later this summer. In the meantime you can check out our preview of the H1 2019 Technic sets here, plus you can visit our Review Library where 100 LEGO sets past and present have been reviewed so far via the link.

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Space Container

Oh. Crap.

That’s what went through this writer’s head when he entered TLCB Towers this morning. The Elves don’t have a bedtime as such, returning to the office as and when they find a blog-worthy creation, although they often sleep in their cage room when we turn the lights out in-between foraging for builds.

Normally this is a peaceful affair, with only minor scuffles reported the following morning. That was not the case today.

Squashed Elves where everywhere, ingrained into the carpet or slammed against furniture. They’re resilient little creatures so they’ll all be fine (probably), but recovering our Elven workforce to a functioning state and cleaning up the Elven bodily fluids spilt during the night is not a fun job. Still, at least we get paid to do it. No that’s not right…

The cause of the destruction was found abandoned in the corridor with an Elf squashed underneath it and another swinging miserably from the crane mounted on the rear.

But what on Earth was it? Well it turns out ‘on Earth’ is the wrong place to start, as this amazing machine is apparently a ‘Martian Heavy Transporter’, a six-wheel-drive, skid steer, off-road crane truck, built to carry containers across the Martian landscape.

Each of those six wheels is fully suspended and powered by an individual XL Motor, with all six hooked up to a BuWizz bluetooth control that delivers up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own Power Functions system. No wonder it could catch the fleeing Elves.

Mounted on the top of the chassis is an enormous remotely operated linear-actuator powered crane that can pull a large container onto the rear of the vehicle with ease, in a manner somewhere between LEGO’s neat 1994 6668 Recycle Truck and something from Robot Wars, or slide it to the ground by unfurling itself rearwards.

It’s a seriously slick piece of engineering and one we’re properly impressed by, even if it the cause of some considerable tidying up plus the need to administer a bit of Elven healthcare. Whilst we get on with that you can see more of this remarkable vehicle courtesy of desert752 of Eurobricks / Kirill Mazurov (aka Desert Eagle) of Flickr.

Head to Eurobricks and/or Flickr via the links for more, where a video of Desert / Kirill’s ‘Martian Heavy Transport’ and a complete gallery of imagery can also be found.

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Whole Lotta Loader

This spectacular creation is a Dressta 560E Extra front loader, and it comes from Bricksley of Flickr. Bricksley’s model looks the business from the outside, complete with incredible attention to detail, custom decals, and ingenious building techniques throughout, however it’s what’s underneath that is even more impressive.

Four Power Functions motors give Bricksley’s Dressta 560E a wealth of remote control functions including four wheel drive (with a turning cooling fan behind the rear grill), centrally articulated steering, and a huge lifting arm complete with a tipping bucket driven by a set of linear actuators.

There’s much more to see of Bricksley’s build at his Dressta 560E Flickr album, where you can also find a link to a video of the model in action, loading what we think are cornflakes no less. Click the link above to make the jump!

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Another Defender

No not that Technic Land Rover Defender, this is the original (it’d be embarrassing if someone thought the new 42110 official Land Rover Defender set was the old one wouldn’t it?…), in North American specification if we’re not mistaken.

The Defender was sold for just a few short years in the United States making it a very rare (and now very cool) vehicle there. As a result prices for Defenders in the U.S have gone insane, which gives us serious inclination to export a few from our home nation, where they can be bought for a few grand and a packet of crisps.

The other alternative is to build your own, which is exactly what Kevin Moo has done with this excellent fully remote controlled Technic version. Underneath the realistic U.S-Spec exterior is a complete four-wheel-drive system with working suspension and remote control steering, plus there are opening doors, a brick-built hard-top, and an authentically spartan interior.

There’s more to see of Kevin’s creation on Flickr and at the Eurobricks discussion forum – click the links to take a look, and you can check out our preview of the upcoming officially licensed Land Rover Defender Technic set (which also inadvertently previews the actual new Land Rover Defender) by clicking here.

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Monstrously Clever

Remote Control monster trucks have a history here at The Lego Car Blog, which – if you’re an Elf at least – is not always a happy one (see here, here, and here). Fortunately today’s example was – despite its excellence – too slow for the Elf at the controls to run down any of its brethren, much to its annoyance.

Don’t let that put you off though, because this monster truck by previous bloggee Kevin Moo is a fantastically clever bit of kit, with all-wheel-drive, all-wheel-steering and all-wheel-suspension.

However that ‘all-wheel-ness’ is not the cleverest part, as Kevin has engineered an ingenious automatically locking centre differential design that keeps the wheels locked together when the truck is driving in a straight line for better grip off-road, yet unlocks when it’s cornering to allow the wheels to spin at the different rates required during a turn.

No, we have no idea how he’s done it either!

There’s lots more to see of Kevin’s Technic monster truck on Flickr and at the Eurobricks discussion forum, plus you watch the video below demonstrating the automatic differential lock to see if you can figure it out…

YouTube Video

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