Tag Archives: Tracked Vehicle

Tracked Lunch Box

Lego Technic Hägglunds BV 206 ATV

OK, after today’s earlier dalliance, we’re back in the room. This is a Hägglunds Bv 206, and it’s one of the mot unusual vehicles ever made. Built for the Swedish military in 1980 the Bv 206 consists of two linked tracked units, with all four tracks powered, and a payload of over two tons, even on snow. Plus you can add another two tons behind the second unit on a trailer, creating a wonderfully weird train-like arrangement.

Despite looking like a pair of lunch boxes the Bv 206 has been a huge success, and is now in use with various militaries, Antarctic research organisations, the British, Icelandic and Canadian Search & Rescue services, and even the Singapore fire department.

This excellent Technic recreation of the Hägglunds Bv 206 comes from Technic BOOM of Eurobricks, and it features an authentically articulated tracked chassis powered by three Power Functions L motors (plus a Technic V6 piston engine), suspended tracks and a fully detailed cabin, er… we mean cabins.

There’s more to see of this delightfully odd creation at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, where you can also watch a video of the vehicle in action and find a military version too. We’re wondering whether we could even fit our lunch inside it…

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Spray Pattern

Lego Technic RC Crop Sprayer

It’s weird animal-related vehicle day here at The Lego Car Blog. First we post a flying crab, and now we’ve got some sort of tracked locust. Ironically, considering its resemblance to the winged eater of crops, this Goldacres G8CT is employed to protect the bounty of the fields.

Built by BrickbyBrickTechnic this impressive Technic crop sprayer is one of the most intricately engineered creations we’ve found in a while, with independently suspended all-track-drive linked to a four-cylinder piston engine, Hand-of-God steering, and a pair of huge motorised spraying arms that can both unfold and lower electrically.

There’s much more to see of BrickbyBrick’s Goldacres G8CT at both Eurobricks (where there is a video showing the 1 metre wide arms in action) and Flickr – take a closer look via the links.

Lego Technic RC Crop Sprayer

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Superfront

Lego Marion 204-M Superfront Mining Shovel SBrick

This is Marion 204-M Superfront cable-operated mining shovel, and it’s massive. First built in 1974 by the Marion Power Shovel Company (who also built NASA’s enormous crawler transporters), the 204-M Superfront used electrically driven cables to drive its huge bucket arm and had a working weight in excess of 700 tons. Built for around twelve years the 204-M worked in open mines all over the world, with the last still operating in Asia decades later.

Lego Marion 204-M Superfront Mining Shovel SBrick

This incredible fully functioning Lego replica of the Marion 204-M Superfront was discovered by one of our Elves on Flickr and it comes from Beat Felber who has recreated the machine in astonishing detail. Powered by eight Power Functions motors and controlled via bluetooth thanks to three third-party SBricks, Beat’s 204-M Superfront uses an XL Motor to drive each track whilst two L Motors can slew the entire superstructure independently. A pair of XL Motors power each of the cable drums and the bucket angle and bucket door are electronically powered by another two motors, giving Beat’s model as much articulation as the real Marion 204-M.

Lego Marion 204-M Superfront Mining Shovel SBrick

There’s a whole lot more to see of this spectacular model at Beat Felber’s Marion 204-M Superfront Flickr album, plus you can read our 5 star review of the SBrick bluetooth controller that makes creations like this possible by clicking here.

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Mortal Engines

Lego Salthook Mortal Engines

There’s an arms-race going on in the SUV market at the moment, with small rich women continually trying to one-up each other in their quest for the largest and most pointless school-run vehicle. Flickr’s Alexis Dos Santos has fast-forwarded to the logical conclusion of this meaningless contest with the perfect vehicle for taking little Ethan and Isabella to the school gates. Unless someone makes a bigger one of course.*

Derived from the new ‘Mortal Engines’ movie trailer, Alexis’ amazing tracked town ‘Salthook’ features Power Functions drive and steering, folding bridges and a wealth of mini-figure scale detailing. A large gallery of stunning imagery is available to view on Flickr – click the link above to check out all of the photos.

Lego Salthook Mortal Engines
*See the official ‘Mortal Engines’ movie trailer here, where there indeed a ‘bigger one’. The next Cadillac Escalade will probably beat it though.

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But It’s All Right Now, In Fact It’s a GAZ

Lego Technic RC GAZ 3351 Sariel

This Thunderbirds-looking thing is actually a GAZ 3351, a real all-terrain transport vehicle with its roots in the Soviet Union. Well, this one’s made of LEGO, but you could buy a real one if you wanted to.

Which is what we suspect the Elves, if they had any money or concept of money, would do – such was the joy (and carnage) amongst them when this powered into the office this morning.

Lego Technic RC GAZ 3351 Sariel

Driven by an XL Motor inside each section and steered via a linear actuator powered articulated pivot, Sariel‘s GAZ 3351 can go almost anywhere, and over almost anything – TLCB Elves included.

The four tracks providing this go-anywhere, smush-anything ability are suspended via oscillating bogies, and are constructed from 560 individual rubber axle-joiners.

This gives the GAZ incredible traction, but the design wasn’t without its teething problems, which you can watch in Sariel’s excellent development and demonstration video below. There are more images to see of Sariel’s GAZ 3351 at his photostream too – click here to take a look.

YouTube Video:

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Grand Canyon

Lego M-Tron

Your Mom sent us a picture of her grand canyon a while back but we can’t post that here, so instead here’s Mark of Falworth‘s version, complete with three neat M-Tron surveillance vehicles deep within it. There’s more to see on Flickr – click the link to take a look.

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The Big Blue – 42042 Crawler Crane Set Review

Most of The Lego Car Blog team are die-hard petrol heads, who exclusively build Technic supercars, filled with working features and Power Functions. However, this writer is not really a car expert nor a Technic expert either. I was recently defenestrated at a TLCB party for having suggested that it might be fun to try to build a spaceship. Fortunately, I survived the incident. The TLCB executive penthouse offices are actually located on the ground floor of a small industrial unit near Wolverhampton. Much chastened, I have resolved to learn more of the art and craft of big-scale, motorised Technic models. What better way to do this than to build one of the monsters of the current Technic range: the 42042 Crawler Crane.

Lego Technic 42042 Review

The set came in nicely large box, with the usual high-quality photos showing the various functions of the crane. The back of the box shows the “A” and “B” models. In contrast to Sariel’s review, I thought that the box was nicely full when I opened it. Tipping the various bags out of the box took me back to childhood Christmases and the excitement of opening the old Technic sets with their studded beams. The first thing that struck me was that the various bags were numbered, just like big System models are nowadays. As I built the model, it was great that I only had one bag open at a time. This made finding the right parts quicker, less frustrating and more fun. A previous big Technic model that I have built had numbered bags but you had to open most of them early in the build, which defeated the point of them in my eyes.

The instruction book is neatly presented and strongly bound. It’s a nice artefact in its own right. Lego instruction books are a lot better at differentiating between dark grey and black than they used to be and this one was easy to use. Disappointingly, for a model in this price range, you have download the instructions for the “B” model from Lego’s website. As the “B” model looks to have the same chassis, there wouldn’t even be the expense of an entire second book. The stickers for the model are in the same bag, which had kept them flat in my case. However, I can see that there’s scope for them to be creased and mangled by the heavy instruction book and so it would be better if they were mounted on a separate card.

LEGO_42042_PROD_DET02_1488

Once I started the build, it turned out that there were actually multiple bags to open for each stage of the build. It was still a lot quicker than sorting through all 1,401 parts in a big pile. First up is the chassis, based around the ubiquitous but strong 64178 differential frame. Building progresses rapidly, with lots of pieces per page. This contrasts noticeably to System sets, especially the ones aimed at younger builders. For most of the stages, I had just five small piles of parts to look through, thanks again to the numbered bags.  After the main chassis, you build each of the sponsons for the tracks. When the two are mated, you begin to realise quite how big this model is going to be. Building the second sponson is a bit boring, as it’s a mirror image of the first but that’s inevitable with this design. When I attached the sponsons, I thought that 5L axles with end stops will be awkward to remove when I disassemble the model. I couldn’t work out why Lego hadn’t used ordinary 5L axles instead. Perhaps one of our Technic expert readers has an idea? Page 48 of the instructions has another step that might prove hard to reverse on disassembly.

By page 54, the chassis was done and it was time to get a coffee and then sit down to assemble each of the huge, 45 link tracks. Whilst I clicked the links together, I reflected on the size and complexity of the finished chassis. It reminded me that much of what you pay for in a Technic set is the immense amount of R&D time that must go into a model like this. To speed up the assembly of the tracks, I made standard 10 link lengths and then clipped them together, adding the last five.  Strangely, for a set of this size and price, there is no spare link of track. Technic is a harsh mistress. Be careful opening the bags of parts and accidentally losing some. By the end of stage one, I had just five spare pieces and no spares of the small cogs or blue, 2L axle/peg connectors. By the end of the build, I had just over a dozen spares, including the 1×1 round transparent plates used as lights.

Stage 2 looks fast, with just three bags of parts. It builds the gearbox and includes four of the newer sliding gear change collars and a pair of the white, 24T, torque limiting clutch gears. There are also some of the new and very useful 1L collars. Once more, the complexity of the design reminded me of how much design and development time you’re paying for in a big Technic set. This also applies to the design and quality of the individual pieces. Just one L motor drives the all of the functions through this gearbox. That two functions can operate simultaneously, is a testament to the power of modern Lego motors. The end of this stage leaves very few spare parts again. I was actually a blue 2L connector peg short and had to nip upstairs and get one from my collection.

LEGO 42042 Review

By now I was 96 pages and 1 ¾ hours into the build. There were four more bags of parts left to go. Continue reading

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