Tag Archives: Tracked Vehicle

Towering Inferno

This is the NASA ‘Launch Umbilical Tower’, designed to send the world’s most powerful machine – the Saturn V rocket – into space, and carried by the world’s heaviest land vehicle.

LEGO’s enormous 92176 NASA Saturn V set has allowed space fans to conduct their own bedroom-based lunar missions, but the ‘blast-off’ bit (in this writer’s opinion, the coolest bit) requires a few additional accessories not supplied by LEGO…

Fortunately Janotechnic of Eurobricks – here making his TLCB debut – has the answer, not only building this incredible 1:110 scale Technic Nasa Crawler and Launch Umbilical Tower, but doing so from three official LEGO Technic sets; the 42055 Bucket Wheel Excavator, the 42082 Rough Terrain Crane, and the 42098 Car Transporter.

That expansive parts supply has enabled Jano to equip his B-B-B-Model with a huge array of motorised functions, including drive and steering, crane rotation, retractable support swing-arms, and even a working lift within the tower!

It’s an incredible creation and one that (in simplified form below) you can build for yourself, as building instructions are available. There’s more of Jano’s amazing NASA Crawler and Tower to see – including a video of the model’s motorised and mechanical functions – at the Eurobricks forum. Click the link above and prepare to blast-off!

Modular Building

LEGO’s brilliant line-up of modular buildings have been a roaring success, but they’re not really TLCB fodder. This awesome Neo-Classic Space ‘T-ATV’ by Flickr’s SweStar is though, and it’s ‘modular building’ too. Sort of.

A superb tracked chassis can carry an assortment of spacey things atop it, including a cabin that doubles as a spaceship, a pair of containers for important spacey-looking devices, and there’s even a mini-figure jet-suit arrangement concealed in the back!

Each module can stand alone as a thoroughly good build, and add them all together and you have a model with such great playability that this TLCB Writer could happily spend an entire afternoon swooshing and tracking and doing other suitably spacey stuff with it.

Whilst he does that you can see more of SweStar’s brilliant build at his ‘T-ATV’ album on Flickr – click the link above for more modular building.

My Other Tracked Vehicle is an Excavator

We’re not sure that this title really works as a bumper sticker, but as this snow groomer by Dyens Creations doesn’t have a bumper it’s moot anyway. Dyen’s creation is indeed constructed from another tracked vehicle though, being built entirely from the parts found within the Technic 42121 Heavy Duty Excavator set. There’s an adjustable elevating blade, a rotating and extending crane, and an attachable ice grinding thingumy too. Building instructions are available and there’s more of Dyen’s snow groomer B-Model to see on Flickr, at Eurobricks, and via the video below.

YouTube Video

Caseload

This is a fully remote controlled Case QuadTrac 620, built by mktechniccreations, and it’s really very good at squashing Elves. It’s also one heck of a build, with no less than six Power Functions motors, two BuWizz bluetooth batteries, and a pneumatic system with on-board compressors. And that’s before we get to the Elmer HaulMaster 2000 trailer.

Back to the Case, where two L Motors drive the fully suspended tracks, whilst a Servo articulates the pivot steering (the rear section of which can also oscillate independently from the front to keep the vehicle level on uneven ground).

Two M Motors power the on-board pneumatic compressors/switches, a third drives the rear PTO, there’s a suspended cab, swing-out ladder (that automatically pivots out of the way of the tracks when the tractor articulates), a rotating driver’s seat, and pneumatically operated hitches.

The Elmer HaulMaster trailer features a few trick of its own too, with the Case’s PTO driving the conveyor belt and auger worm-gear, pneumatically operated auger boom extension, and pneumatically deployed support legs.

It’s an unfathomably complex and wonderfully engineered build, and there’s lots more to see of mktechniccreations’ incredible creation at the Eurobricks forum via the link above, where complete technical details, further imagery, and a link to building instructions can be found.

You can also see all the amazing working functions of both the Case Quadtrac 620 and Elmer HaulMaster 2000 in action via the video below; click play to take a look at one of the best models of 2021 so far.

YouTube Video

The Pusher

This TLCB Writer’s peaceful afternoon watching Top Gear re-runs working hard to keep TLCB wheels in motion was unwelcomely disturbed today. Disturbed by the unusual sound of distant Elven screaming, getting increasingly louder, before fading away again, only to be repeated a few minutes later.

Sigh. Whatever was going on it probably wasn’t good. A trudge out to the corridor revealed the cause; a rather unique vehicle, powerfully pushing a cohort of several enraged Elves up and down the halls of TLCB Towers with a large blade.

Upon seeing a ‘hoomun’ arrive to interrupt the fun, the Elf at the controls raised the blade so its colleagues passed underneath it, only for them to be squashed not once but twice by the following tracks, whereupon the delighted perpetrator promptly abandoned the controls and ran off.

Order restored we can take a look at the vehicular cause, a fully remote controlled Technic ‘Snow Dozer’ by Kirill Mazurov (aka desert752), powered by no less than thirteen Power Functions motors.

Eight of these drive the tracks, with two more powering the articulated steering, another two the rear crane, and the last the blade elevation used so effectively by the Elf that found it. A pair of third-party BuWizz bluetooth batteries provide the power (eight times as much as LEGO’s own system) and control mechanism, allowing Kirill’s machine to both push an impressive quantity of snow (or TLCB Elves) and to travel far faster than it has any right to.

There’s much more of Kirill’s strange yet spectacular creation to see at both his ‘Technic Snow Dozer’ Flickr album and via the Eurobricks discussion forum, plus you can watch it in action in the snow via the video below.

YouTube Video:

*Today’s wonderful title song. Which could be about a different kind of snow.

Giant Vibrator

Get your minds out of the gutter. This is a Vibroseis Tracked Vehicle, designed to send shock waves through the ground to map rock density for the oil and gas industry, and it is – in effect – a giant vibrator.

This intriguing Technic recreation of one of the world’s more unusual vehicles comes from Master MOcer and multiple previous bloggee Nicco71, who has built it using only parts from the 42100 Technic Leibherr R 9800 excavator set.

The three repurposed XL Motors drive both sets of tracks plus the piston engine mounted in the rear section, whilst the set’s four L Motors power the winch, the articulated steering, the vibrator height, and the vibrating action.

There’s loads more to see of this remarkable creation at Nico71’s website by clicking here – where building instructions can also be found so you can use this giant vibrator for yourself at home – plus you can watch it in action in the only safe-for-work vibrator footage on the internet via the video below.

YouTube Video

A Canadian in Siberia

Canadians are known for their politeness and generosity. Although that might just be in comparison to their noisy neighbour in the basement. Still, even Canadian inventions demonstrate this altruism, with the country responsible for insulin, the pacemaker, the garbage bag, the electric wheelchair, road lines, and the Wonderbra, all of which – we’re sure you’ll agree – have been massively beneficial to mankind.

Cue today’s creation, a Ural 5920 tracked off-road truck, based on a design shared by the Canadians (of course) in the early 1970s. The Soviets took another decade to copy re-engineer the Canadian design, fitting a Ural 375 cab and starting production the mid-’80s until the collapse of the Soviet Union.

This magnificent fully remote controlled Technic recreation of the Ural 5920 captures the Canadian Soviet tracked truck brilliantly, including the two huge track bogies that swivel thanks to motorised linear-actuators. An XL Motor drives each pair of tracks (plus the V8 piston engine under the hood), and each track wheel is suspended by an individual torsion beam, allowing the model to traverse a landscape as varied (albeit smaller) as that travelled by the real thing.

Previous bloggee Samolot is the builder behind this amazing creation and there’s more to see – including a video of the model in action and detailed photos of the remarkable drivetrain – at the Eurobricks discussion forum, plus the complete image gallery can be viewed via Bricksafe here. Click the links above to head into the wilds of Siberia.

To Walmart!

It’s Black Friday! Which means the entire office are off to Walmart to fight middle aged women for discounted electricals. Not really, we’re very much remaining here and very much buying nothing, because a) we’re in another COVID-19 lockdown, and b) most importantly, Black Friday can suck it.

Still, if you must venture out to storm your local Walmart, have we got the vehicle for you! This is Ivan Martynov‘s ‘PanzerVVagen Heavy Terrestrial Assault Vehicle’, and it’s the perfect transport for the annual shopocalypse. Martin’s even racked up some old lady kills which are displayed proudly on the side.

Take the PanzerVVagen to Walmart and add your own old lady stamp (Carol from across the street isn’t going to get that last half-price TV alive!) via the link above!

Skid Marks

The Lego Car Blog Elves, as has been well documented on these pages, love to commit acts of extreme violence on one another. We’re not really sure why, but as we suspect a trip inside the Elven mind to uncover the reasons for this evolutionary oddity would raise more questions than answers, we’re content to let it be.

Today’s source of mythical mischief comes courtesy of JLiu15 of Flickr, who has recreated this neat remotely controlled tracked loader. A suite of Power Functions motors provide the drive, skid-steering, and linear-actuator-driven bucket elevation and tipping, which the Elf at the controls used first to first scoop up its fellow workers that weren’t paying attention, then drop them onto the floor to run them over.

We now have some Elven skid marks to clear up, so whilst we do that you can head to JLui15’s ‘Tracked Loader’ album to see more, before we return later on today with a very different sort of skidding vehicle…

The Pusher*

This neat Liebherr PR776 bulldozer was found by one of our Elves today. Being small scale and unmotorised there was no smushing to be had, but it does look rather good, with great attention to detail and some inventive parts placement too. FLBRICKS of Flickr is is the builder behind it, making their TLCB debut, and there’s more to see at their photostream via the link.

*Today’s excellent title song.

Big Red

The halls of TLCB Towers were a bustling place today. Several Elves have recently returned with finds, TLCB staff were pretending to be busy to avoid sweeping up the cage room, and the Le Mans 2020 livestream was ticking over in the corner. All of which meant we were thoroughly distracted from the Elf proudly riding atop this rather brilliant remote control Caterpillar D10 bulldozer until it was too late.

‘Too late’ in this case means we now have a bit more than sweeping up to do, as several Elves have been smeared across the corridor (and over the front of the bulldozer) thanks to builder keymaker‘s inclusion of four Power Functions motors and a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery, controlling the drive, steering, and ripper and blade mechanisms.

Individual suspension on the tracks’ jockey wheels plus track tensioners meant the blade stayed at Elf-smearing height even if one of them went under the tracks, whilst a working V8 engine, detailed cabin and engine bay, and opening doors and tool compartment add to the realism, if not the Elf-smushing capabilities.

We now have some considerable floor cleaning to do, as a number of our smelly little workers were caught off guard and fell victim the the D10’s blade, then tracks, then ripper, which doesn’t sound fun at all. Whilst we get on with that you can see more of keyworker’s most excellent creation at both the Eurobricks forum via the link above, or on Bricksafe, where over forty high quality images are available to view.

Lastly, if you’re wondering how mechanisms such as those found on keyworker’s ‘dozer work then come back to The Lego Car Blog later today where we’ll be sharing an awesome new tool that does just that!

Size Matters

Much like your Mom’s waistline or Donald Trump’s self-interest, some things just keep getting bigger. This is L E G O Z ; ) ‘Wegener 48400 Mining Excavator’, and if you thought his mining truck that featured here earlier in the month was massive, just look at this!

Created digitally in Bricklink Studio 2.0, the 48400 measures over 100 virtual studs in length and 90 high, making the mini-figures on board look very tiny indeed. Like Donald Trump hands.

A fusion reactor powers the 48400 and its 46×50 stud bucket, with the necessary tanks of water and nitrogen slung underneath. A crew of ten mini-figures operate the excavator (although it can accommodate up to fifty), and two cockpits control the bucket arm and tracked steering separately due to the vehicle’s immense size.

It’s an incredibly inventive design, with astonishing attention to detail everywhere you look. And there is a lot to look at, with the images enhanced in photoshop to include a lifelike livery, decals, and the ‘Hibernia’ background landscape.

There’s loads more to see of the 48400 and the Wegener mining truck that featured here previously at L E G O Z’s ‘Wegener Mining [Red Series]’ album on Flickr – click the link above to make the jump into a very large digital world.

America’s Movable Fighting Man

G.I. Joe has been the default choice for any patriotic American boy since the 1960s. This is despite him being, well… a doll, and – we suspect – boyfriend/GBFF to Barbie on the side (we’ve never seen Ken and Joe in the same room at once… just sayin’).

No matter, because when he’s not wearing a hawaiian shirt or driving a pink convertible, Ken G.I. Joe gets access to some pretty awesome stuff. Stuff like this, an articulated tank/rocket launcher device entitled the ‘Cobra Maggot’.

Built by Big Easy Bricks making their TLCB debut, the Maggot is every bit as playable as the real 1987 G.I. Joe toy, with working tracks, an accessible control room, and two rocket launcher/cannon arrangements. There’s more to see of Big Easy’s Cobra Maggot on Flickr – take a look via the link above.

Teal Kobelco

Lego don’t produce many teal coloured parts. However the range is increasing, and with a little ingenuity, and maybe a few custom pieces, a complex teal creation can be built, and the results can be – if this amazing Kobelco SK210 HLC excavator is an accurate reflection – pretty special.

Built by Maciej Szymańsk this fully remote controlled tracked excavator is all LEGO, apart from the pneumatic cylinders which are bespoke, matching LEGO’s teal colour and offering far greater reach than official components, and an 11V battery box.

In fact 5.5kgs of LEGO pieces have been used to recreate the Kobelco SK210 HLC, a Japanese excavator which – according to the decals at least – is a hybrid, although how a that works in practice we have no idea. We can’t see much regenerative braking going on and it would likely need about a month to charge up if it’s a PHEV.

Maciej’s creation carries its power on board, thanks to that custom battery, powering LEGO Power Functions motors and a suite of LED lights. The motors drive the tracks, superstructure rotation, and the compressor for the pneumatics, giving the model superbly accurate movements which you can view on YouTube here.

There’s much more to see of Maciej’s incredible build at Eurobricks and at his Kobelco SK210 HLC Flickr album, where you can find the full gallery of imagery including WIP shots, close-ups of the excellent brick-built tracks, and a version that switches the bucket shown here for a set of pincer-y jaw type things that we’re glad the Elves didn’t find. Click the link above to make the teal transition.

My Other Car’s a Mining Excavator

With over 4,000 pieces, bluetooth remote control, and seven electric motors, LEGO’s enormous (and enormously expensive) Technic 42100 Liebherr R 9800 Excavator set is the largest yet produced by the company. If you’re going to make a ‘B-Model’, using just the parts from one official LEGO set, it may as well be from the biggest!

Previous bloggee and Technic genius Grohl has done just that, with his amazing 42100 snow groomer B-Model. With seven motorised functions including remote control drive and skid-steering, an elevating front blade, lowering groomy-thigumy on the back, plus a crane and winch, Grohl’s 42100 alternate is as functions-packed as the set from which it’s been built.

Grohl promises instructions are on the way if you fancy turning your own Liebherr excavator into a snow groomer yourself, and until then you can check out the build on Flickr via the link above.

We’re also looking for you to build your own B-Models from existing LEGO sets (whether that be from the enormous 42100 Liebherr R 9800 or the smallest City set) in TLCB’s Lock-Down B-Model Competition. You could even win yourself some brilliant bluetooth remote control prizes to bring your Lego creations to life! Check out the competition details by clicking here and get B-Modelling!