Category Archives: Model Team

My Other Car’s a Pick-Up

LEGO have released a whole host of Porsche 911 sets in recent times, including the enormous 42056 Technic 911 GT3 RS, the 42096 Technic 911 RSR, the 10295 Creator 911 and the 75895 Speed Champions 911 Turbo 3.0.

But what if you own the 10290 Creator Classic Pick-Up set instead of any of the above, and you’d like to join the 911 club too? Ex-LEGO set designer Nathanael Kuipers has the answer!

This lovely early Porsche 911 is built only from the pieces found within the 10290 set, and – save for a few mis-coloured hinges – you’d never know there was a strict parts limitation.

Building instructions are available and there’s more to see on Flickr by clicking here.

Bah Humbug!

Civilian Hummers are rubbish. Whether a lightly adapted military transport or a re-bodied Chevrolet Tahoe, they’re enjoyed principally by conspiracy-theorising, climate-change denying, ‘Freedom!’-shouting blancmanges. And TLCB Elves.

Hence why we have one here today, otherwise we’d have had an Elven riot to quash, and also – begrudgingly – it is absolutely brilliant.

Built by Michael217, this beautifully presented Hummer H1 features a Power Functions remote controlled 4×4 drivetrain and steering, all-wheel independent suspension, opening doors and hood, plus a highly detailed engine bay and interior, which is so realistic we half expected to see a gun rack and ‘MAGA’ flag.

An extensive gallery of images available to view at Michael’s ‘Hummer H1’ Bricksafe page, plus there’s more to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum. Grab your ‘MAGA’ flag and storm the Capitol via the links above!

Racing Snake

Early-’00s American cars are fat, badly built, inefficient, poor handling crap-boxes, and you’d have to be an idiot to like any of them.

This is an early-’00s Dodge Viper; a fat, badly built, inefficient, poor handling crap-box, and it’s one of our favourite cars ever.

Even more so in this configuration, the 2003 GTS-R endurance racer, as constructed to near-perfection in 1:14 scale by TLCB favourite SP_LINEUP.

SP has used over 1,300 pieces to recreate the iconic American racing car, including a beautifully detailed interior, engine bay, chassis bracing, brick-built drivetrain, and the spectacular GTS-R long-tail bodywork.

There’s more to see at SP’s photostream and you can make the jump to an early-’00s endurance race – and one of TLCB favourite cars ever (because we’re idiots) – via the link above.

What a Load…

Loading. Reloading. Unloading. All the loadings are excellent. At least according to mahjqa and his co-conspirators.

This is mahjqa’s lovely Model Team / Technic truck, and it is – as you’d expect from a TLCB Master MOCer and motion-making extraordinaire – fully remote controlled, right down to the ‘fifth wheel’ trailer hitch.

Of course mahjqa didn’t stop there though, devising a fiendishly tricky competition in which Lego trucks such as this one, plus trailers and ingenious little RC forklifts all operate to, well… move stuff about rather pointlessly.

In the words of the creator, it’s “ten minutes of bad manoeuvring, dropped cargo, and unprofessional commentary”, which definitely sounds like our kind of contest film.

Take a look via the video below, and you can see more of mahjqa’s entry at his Flickr album and at the Eurobricks discussion forum via these links.

YouTube Video

Goldie Lookin Chain

Once the only available gold LEGO pieces were, well… gold, but these days all manner of parts are available in the blingiest hue. We suspect not quite as many as ianying616‘s Ducati V4R Panigale utilises though.

Still, paint and decals or not, ianying’s Ducati looks absolutely magnificent in its golden colour scheme, and there’s loads more of it to see on Flickr at the link above, where there’s an even goldier motorcycle available if you’re Lil Jon.

*Today’s title song. Obviously.

Conveniently Placed Ramp

We’re not sure what this DAF FTN CF 480 Space Cab is pulling, but it sure looks like the kind of thing that will conveniently appear at just the right moment during a movie car chase. Whatever it is there’s more to see of it, the 5-axle trailer it’s resting upon, and the DAF TFN that’s pulling it courtesy of Arian Janssens. Make your jump-based escape via the link above!

Doublevo

It’s a Volvo truck double here at The Lego Car Blog, much to the joy of the Elf that found this pair of Model Team creations, thus earning itself two meal tokens. Will it save one for another day or use both to pig out? We think we all know the answer to that…

Anyway, the models. Both are the work of newcomer MCD of Eurobricks, who has recreated Volvo’s ’90s F16 truck beautifully in 1:21 Model Team form. Twice. Each build includes a linear actuator operated raising axle, ‘Hand of God’ steering, opening doors, and superbly replicated interior and exterior details that incorporate both Technic and System pieces.

Further imagery and full build details can be found at the Eurobricks discussion forum, and you can make the jump via the link in the text above.

High Five

Renualt’s humble 5 was a shopping-car favourite in the 1980s. And a joke by the 1990s. Now that most have been thrown away though, they are properly cool. Particularly in ‘Turbo’ flavour, from back when a whole model could simply be called ‘Turbo’ and nothing else, as it was clearly the most important bit.

Cue Darren Thew’s wonderful Renault 5 Turbo rally car, in tarmac ‘Tour de Corse’ specification, and sporting some fantastically accurate decals (which the Elves seem to really like too for some reason).

Blending Technic and System parts beautifully, Darren’s Renault 5 includes a detailed interior, complete with roll cage and harnesses, plus a highly accurate dashboard and controls, whilst under the opening hood is superb replica of the 5’s four-cylinder engine, including the famed forced-induction component that the whole car was named after.

It’s a brilliant build and one that’s definitely worth a closer look. Spool up your turbo and head to Corsica in the 1980s by clicking these words, plus here’s a bonus link of the real Renault 5 Turbo Tour de Corse winner in action.

Speed Kills

And so do cigarettes.

This is the Cigarette One 515, an unfeasibly enormous AMG-powered speedboat built by the Cigarette boat company, whose story is rather fantastic. Or rather, the story of their designer is…

Donald Aronow was born in Brooklyn to a Russian-Jewish immigrant family in 1927. After working overseas during the Second World War, Aronow returned to the U.S and started a construction firm during the boom of the 1950s. A few years later, aged just 32, Aronow was a millionaire, and moved to Miami where he began racing boats for fun.

Over the next decade, and after winning two Powerboat World Championships, racing boats had become a business, with Aronow selling his race-winning Cigarette powerboat designs to the super-rich, politicians, and crime bosses alike. We suspect some were all three.

The speed of Aronow’s boats meant they became a popular choice for Miami’s cocaine smugglers, and the U.S Customs Service who aimed to catch them (via a deal brokered by Vice President George H.W Bush, who was a Cigarette customer himself).

This choice of customer eventually became Aronow’s undoing, and he was shot dead in 1987 by fellow-boat racer turned racing-company owner Ben Kramer and an accomplice, after a business deal turned sour. That Kramer was already a drug smuggler himself (despite winning the American Offshore Powerboat Championship only the year before) perhaps should’ve been a red flag.

The Cigarette Company continued after Aronow’s murder however, and this awesome looking Lego recreation of the One 515 shows their boats are as mad today as ever. It comes from previous bloggee Drop Shop, who has packed it with details and brilliant building techniques to accurately capture the insanity of the real thing, and there’s lots more of the build to see at Drop Shop’s ‘Sinister Cigarette’ album on Flickr.

Finally, if you think all of the above would make for an amazing movie, you’re right. Unfortunately we got a terrible one. Still, you can check out the ‘Speed Kills’ trailer here, as the post’s title hinges on it!

UMM Alter II | Picture Special

The UMM Alter II is surely one of the most tragic looking off-roaders ever conceived. Designed in France, but then sold to Portugal presumably for being too ugly, the UMM was a pretty decent off-roader, and found a reasonable following around the Mediterranean with militaries, utility companies, and civilians.

Simple, easy to work on, and powered by common Peugeot engines, around 10,000 Alter IIs were produced in an eight year production run beginning in 1986, with many still in use today.

Most don’t look like this though.

Ricky.Silva’s Model Team UMM Alter II is in ‘v.Sport’ specification, and it looks a lot cooler than standard 4×4. Chunky wheels under working suspension, an external cage, roof lights, fender flairs, and snorkel all feature, plus the model features a detailed interior behind opening doors and a highly realistic engine under an opening hood.

Ricky’s UMM Alter II is presented beautifully too, and there’s lots more to see of the build at his ‘UMM Alter II v.Sport’ album on Flickr. Click the link above to take a closer look at the coolest UMM there is.

VTEC Just Kicked In Yo

The car of nine thousand memes. And nine thousand revs. Which is a lot.

The Honda S2000 was quite a special thing when it debuted in 1999, taking Honda’s VTEC system to the max, and fitted with a naturally-aspirated engine delivering a higher specific output per litre than anything that had gone before. Supercars included.

It also had rather spiky handling and a gauge cluster from a 1980s microwave, but none of that mattered when you reached peak power output at 8,800rpm.

This one was discovered by one of our Elves on Flickr, and comes from Mihail Rakovskiy who has captured it near perfectly in brick form.

Take it to the 9,000rpm red line via the link above.

DUNE

A new attempt at a ‘Dune’ movie arrived in cinemas this month, which – unlike past films baring the name – actually looks rather good. Cue today’s creation, which is entitled ‘Fresh Duner’, so we’re in no way using the aforementioned film to trick unwitting movie-goers to this crumbling corner of the internet.

The ‘Fresh Duner’ comes from Martin Vala, and it looks like a combination of a Dakar and Extreme E racers. Martin’s constructed it in Gulf colours too, which would be ironic if it raced in the latter formula, but nevertheless it looks fab here.

The brilliantly bodywork sits atop a wonderfully life-like chassis, with brick built steering and suspension components adding a dose more realism to Martin’s concept racer. A desert backdrop completes the build, and there’s more to see of Martin’s ‘Fresh Duner’ at his photostream via the link above.

Packing 8*

This is a 1926 Bugatti Type 41 Packard Prototype, and it reminds us an awful lot of a particular vehicular Family Guy scene. Because we’re children.

The Type 41 was Bugatti’s first rolling chassis, fitted with a modified Packard body and a comically enormous 14.7 litre straight-eight aero engine. Which explains the Bugatti’s unfeasibly long bonnet, because when you’re packing 8 it’s rather hard to hide it.

This beautifully neat Model Team recreation of the Type 41 is the work of 1corn of Flickr, and there’s more to see of his exceedingly long package, sorry Packard-based Bugatti via the link above.

*Also because we’re children

Beige Brick Barkas

This pot of Communist cream is a Barkas B1000, an East German forward-control van produced from 1961 until 1988, and powered by a tiny one-litre, three-cylinder, two-stroke engine.

Available as a pick-up, an 8-seat minibus, and – as pictured here – a panel van, the B1000 could carry a one-ton payload (probably very slowly), and proved so reliable and adept at doing so it was built virtually unchanged for nearly thirty years.

This charming Model Team recreation of the B1000 comes from previous bloggee and TLCB favourite Legostalgie, who has captured the East German workhorse beautifully in beige bricks.

Opening doors and a superbly detailed interior are included, and you can head to the other side of the Iron Curtain sometime in the 1970s via the link to Flickr above.

Panic-Buy Fuel!

There is currently a fuel supply crisis in TLCB’s home nation, caused by COVID or Brexit or something.

Whatever the reason, a portion of the population (probably the same portion who stock-piled toilet rolls during the COVID lock-downs) have gone mad, and are trying to refuel every five minutes, in doing so turning a really rather minor problem into a rather larger one. Because they’re idiots.

Typifying this idiocy are a select group of morons who have followed tanker trucks in the hope they’re delivering fuel, and not olive oil, or liquid nitrogen, or – in one particularly amusing case – mortar.

Cue Arian Janssens‘ DAF FTS XF95 ‘Mestwagen’, which we think means manure tanker, but frankly without actually knowing what’s inside it we’re just guessing, much like a worrying number of the UK population have been doing over the past week or two.

You can follow Arian’s DAF ‘Mestwagen’ to wherever it is it’s going in the hope of procuring some petrol via the link above, whilst we start stockpiling tinned food and toilet paper.