Tag Archives: rc

Spin Doctor*

Lego Technic Bladerunner Spinner

The iconic Spinner from the 1982 sci-fi epic ‘Blade Runner’ has appeared here in multiple forms over the years. From large scale brick-built versions to smaller mini-figure builds, there’s a spinner for everyone. Except Technic fans, who have – until now – been unrepresented.

Syd Mead’s infamous design has finally been Technic-ed, thanks to previous bloggee Jeroen Ottens who has created this utterly wonderful (and brilliantly motorised) version of the Spinner in Technic form.

With doors that open electrically and a motorised transformation from ground to flight modes, Jeroen’s design is more than a visual treat too. You can watch that transformation in action by clicking here and you can see more of the build on Flickr, where a link to instructions is also available.

Lego Technic Bladerunner Spinner

*We haven’t had a title song in a while. Here’s today’s.

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Sherping Through the Snow

Lego Sherp ATV Remote Control BuWizz

Another day in TLCB Office. It’s cold outside, there’s snow on the ground, and pictures of Margot Robbie won’t look at themselves. Sadly TLCB Elves care not for this writer’s quiet contemplation and a cacophony of noise smashed through the doorway from the corridor. Sigh. Considerable past experience meant this writer knew that a long morning was in store.

A weary trudge to the source of the commotion revealed a grey box on wheels spinning furiously atop several decidedly squashed Elves. Mr. Airhorn was deployed, the spinning box ceased its rotation, and an unseen Elf jumped down from a low shelf and ran off, cackling wildly.

With the box now stationary we could uncover what it was, and what it was was a small Technic version of the amphibious Russian oddity known as the ‘Sherp’, and it was ridiculously powerful.

Just how ridiculously powerful? Well take a look at the video below…

YouTube Video

With a separate and fully-suspended motor powering each of the four wheels, plus a BuWizz bluetooth battery brick providing up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own battery, there has probably never been a more capable Elf-smushing creation than this. Ever.

Technic-building legend Sariel is the evil genius behind the Technic Sherp ATV and he’s made a wealth of high-quality images available via Flickr. Click these words to take a look at the model in greater detail at Sariel’s photostream, whilst we spend a morning trying to get Elf blood out of the carpet, and maybe dispatch a few of the fallen to the ‘Elf Hospital‘…

Lego Sherp ATV Remote Control BuWizz

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A Super Car

Lego Technic Supercar RC

Since the Technic Car Chassis set back in 1980, LEGO have brought increasingly realistic ‘supercar’ sets to market, from the all-wheel-drive and directly-named 8880 ‘Supercar’ of ’94 and the beautifully styled 8448 ‘Super Street Sensation’ of ’99, to the latest Porsche and Bugatti partnership sets which include everything from W16 engines to working paddle-shift gearboxes.

The Lego Community has also got in on the action, building Technic Supercars that rival (and even eclipse) the official sets. To qualify for ‘supercar’ status a model must include a functioning drivetrain (engine, gearbox and driven wheels), working suspension, and functioning steering.

Lego Technic Supercar RC

These days with the prevalence of Power Functions remote control components the lines have become a bit blurred, but we’re willing to overlook a few missing functions in today’s post because a) it does indeed replace a piston engine and gearbox with a suite of electric motors, and b) it’s all been squeezed into a model considerably smaller than we’re used to from Technic Supercars.

Designed by previous bloggee Kevin Moo, this Porsche-esque ‘supercar’ is powered by twin L Motors, with a Servo providing steering. All-wheel-suspension is taken care of independently up front and via a clever Watts multi-link system at the rear. Opening doors and hood also feature, and there’s a whole lot more to see on Flickr, where Kevin’s album also contains renders of the drive and suspension systems, and on Eurobricks, where a video of the model is also available to view. Take a look via the links.

Lego Technic Supercar RC

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42065 Technic Tracker Racer | Review

LEGO Technic 42065 Tracked Racer

We’ve been a bit lazy on the reviewing front here at The Lego Car Blog of late. We do have a large review coming, but in the meantime our pals over at, er… BrickPals, have joined us to add another LEGO set to our ever-expanding Set Review Library (which is now contains over 100 reviews!). Over to Jack from the BrickPals team….

Hey guys, Jack here, and today I’ll be bringing you a review of LEGO’s 42065 Technic RC Tracked Racer, a set first released in 2017. Featuring some 370 pieces, 42065 retails for £74.99 in the UK, $99.99 in the US and 79.99€ in Europe and comes with a range of Power Functions parts; an IR receiver, a remote control, a battery box and 2 medium motors. With that in mind it seems like great value, but how good is the racer itself?

The Box

This is your pretty standard Technic box with the orange Power Functions strip on the side. Opening it up you’ll find three bags. Two have parts and smaller bags in them, and the other contains the Power Functions components. Interestingly, the battery box was not included in this bag and instead is loose inside the box.

The Build

You start off by building the base of the racer. This is very straightforward and provides no real interesting building techniques but a sturdy support for what’s to come.

Next, the battery box, receiver and two medium motors are added. I was a bit surprised that the receiver was mounted on top of the battery box, but this does not interfere with the removal/inserting of the battery pack.

After this, we start to build the outer layer of the racer. This is built separately from the existing build and uses white and green panels to achieve the desired shape. A few interesting techniques are used when constructing and angling the ‘bonnet’. Two clear pieces sit at the front and represent lights – I was impressed with how well the angles line up to the triangular green pieces. There are nine stickers to be applied to the racer, and these are all added on to this green shell. This is somewhat frustrating as it means many stickers applied one after the other, due to no stickers being placed on the chassis of the car.

The completed and be-stickered bodywork is then attached to the chassis of the car at the front, where it can hinge roughly 160 degrees at the point it sits above the battery box.

LEGO Technic 42065 Tracked Racer Review

Playability

This was a very straightforward build, predominately for one reason – this set’s main purpose is to be a remote control car, unlike other Technic sets which attempt to replicate different functions of a vehicle.

So how does it drive? There is one medium motor which powers the left track and another medium motor powering the right. These are connected to the IR receiver which is connected to the battery box. The remote control communicates with the receiver.

There are two levers on the control, and they each control one motor. To go forwards, both levers must be held in the forward position. To go backwards, both leavers must be held in the backwards position. This is pretty simple, but what happens if you want to turn? Assuming the racer is driving away from you, only holding down the left control will make it turn right (so you’re essentially ‘dropping power’ on the side you want to turn). If the racer is coming towards you and you want to turn right, you hold down the right control. The opposite applies in both cases for turning left. Anyways, it takes a while to get used to the steering – especially for someone like myself who’s built RC cars where one motor does all the turning and the other powers the two back wheels.

How does 42065 perform on different surfaces? The racer works best on smooth surfaces but it also works well on carpet, being able to negotiate obstacles (or TLCB Elves, Ed.) and climb small inclines (or over TLCB Elves… Ed.). Continue reading

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Kolos Krush

Lego Technic Tatra Kolos 8x8

The Lego Car Blog Elves have been peaceful in 2019 thus far. Too peaceful. Fear not though avid readers, today the little scumbags were back on form courtesy of this; MajklSpajkl’s incredible remote control Tatra T813 KOLOS 8×8 trial truck.

Sitting atop eight of the enormous wheels found within the 42054 Claas Xerion set is a wonderfully be-stickered body, within which is hidden a wealth of Technic brilliance. Two Power Functions XL Motors drive all eight independently-suspended wheels, the first four of which steer via an L motor, whilst a further Power Functions motor operates a high/low range gearbox. A working V12 piston engine is placed under the cab, and the model can be driven via bluetooth thanks to a third-party BuWizz brick that delivers up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own battery system.

Lego Technic Tatra Kolos 8x8

That makes for a model with a seriously impressive off-roading capability, which also means the Tatra had no trouble driving over a multitude of Elves here at TLCB Towers. Even in the highest of its two gears, MajklSpajkl’s KOLOS is pretty slow beast, however the Elves have learned of ways to navigate this hindrance – in this case the lucky Elf responsible for finding the Tatra slipped away unnoticed whilst its compatriots were watching cartoons, and simply arrived back in the room riding on top of it to run them over from behind. There’s no honour in Elven battle it seems.

Lego Technic Tatra Kolos 8x8

Those that escaped the smushing promptly dragged the assailant from its vehicle and fed it into the VHS machine, as has become customary, so now we have many broken Elves, and possibly a broken VHS machine too. Whilst we continue the clear-up you can see more of MajklSpajkl’s brilliant Technic Tatra at the Eurobricks forum by clicking these words, where you can find a full description, some superb build and on-location shots, and a video of the creation in action too.

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Technic Traction

Lego Traction Engine

We’re not sure what’s got into The Lego Car Blog Elves this weekend, but they’re bringing back builds of a very classical nature. From the inventively old to the actually old now, and two absolutely beautiful Technic steam tractors from Flickr’s Nikolaus Lowe.

An unusual choice for a Technic build we think these – somewhat oddly – qualify for ‘Technic Supercar’ status, being equipped with working steering, brakes, piston and valve gear, and a two-speed transmission.

Head over to Flickr for the complete gallery of images, where you can also find a link to vote for Nikolaus’ design on LEGO Ideas, whilst we figure out how the Elves have been watching ‘Downton Abbey’.

Lego Traction Engine

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The Coolest Fire Truck

Lego Technic Tatra T815 Fire Truck

All fire trucks are cool. OK, maybe not this one, but pretty much everything else. The coolest of the lot could well be this, the awesome Tatra T815-CAS32. With six-wheel-drive and a 360-degree rotating turret-mounted water canon, there’s nothing we’d rather put out a fire with.

This fantastic Technic replica of the Tatra fire truck comes from previous bloggee Horcik Designs of Flickr, and not only has he nailed the exterior of his T815, he’s engineered a fully-working miniaturisation of the Tatra’s drivetrain, suspension and fire-fighting apparatus underneath too.

Horcik’s model features six-wheel-drive courtesy of LEGO’s Power Functions Motors, with remote control steering, powered hose-reel winches, an on-board compressor, and a motorised elevating and rotating turret.

There’s more to see of Horcik’s superb creation at his photostream, including a money-shot of how all of that lot has been squeezed in. Head to Flickr via the link above to dial 911.

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Monster Mash*

Lego Technic Monster Truck

It’s the final day of 2018 and most of the Elves – caged over Christmas – are away searching hungrily for the very best Lego vehicles the interweb has to offer. A few Elves returned with finds pretty quickly, and another joined them today at the controls of this, a rather cool looking remote control Monster Truck from previous bloggee and TLCB Master MOCer Nico71.

Unfortunately for the Elves already back in TLCB Towers, the speed of their return meant they became unwilling participants in the latest (and hopefully last – for 2018 at least) smushing.

With all-wheel-drive, torsion bar suspension, and portal drive for mega ground clearance, the Elf at the controls of Nico71’s monster truck had no problem running down several of its unsuspecting colleagues in the halls of the office.

With the truck now in the hands of TLCB staff and the squashed Elves mostly patched back together the perpetrator has wisely absconded back from whence it came, meal token in hand, whilst we clean a variety of Elven bodily fluids out of the office carpet.

You can check out Nico’s remote control monster truck at his website, where an extensive gallery of images is available and – to the joy of those that reply to TLCB inbox – instructions can be found too. Click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Technic Monster Truck

*The final title song of 2018! Enjoy.

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Great & Small

Lego Technic Suzuki Jimny

This is the new Suzuki Jimny, and we absolutely LOVE it. Like the new Mercedes-Benz G-Wagon, Suzuki have taken a retro approach to the styling of their new car (to much success), but unlike the new G-Wagon – which will be bought by rappers, wannabe rappers, and hedge-fund managers – the Jimny will be bought by people who will actually take it off-road. A lot.

With a proper four-wheel-drive system, body-on-frame construction, and tiny overhangs the little Jimny will trounce any SUV off-road, despite having just 1500cc and only 100bhp (which is actually a fair bit more than the previous one). The result is a car which, in TLCB’s home nation at least, already has sizeable waiting list. But then it has been twenty years since Suzuki last redesigned it, which is rather a long wait.

Lego Technic Suzuki Jimny

Don’t worry though, if you’d like to get your hands on the new Jimny we have an alternative! A 1:10 scale alternative…

This wonderful little Technic replica of the new Jimny comes from filsawgood, and not only has he recreated the dinky Suzuki 4×4 superbly, he’s made instructions available too!

Underneath the delightful exterior is a remotely controlled all-wheel-drive system complete with solid-axle suspension and powered by a third-party BuWizz bluetooth brick, which enables the model to be controlled via mobile phone and delivers up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own Power Functions battery. Two L motors drive all four wheels whilst a Servo powers the steering, plus there are LED lights, opening doors, hood and tailgate.

Lego Technic Suzuki Jimny

There are loads more images of filsawgood’s remote control Suzuki Jimny available to view on both Flickr and at the Eurobricks forum, where you can also find a video demonstrating the model’s features and a link to building instructions so that you can build your own!

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School Run Mom

Lego Lexus RX450H

The Lexus RX450h may sound like it’s named after a photocopier, but it is in fact one of America’s best selling luxury SUVs. Because how else is little Cody supposed to get to school? Still, at least the RX450h is a hybrid, so Cody’s Mom won’t be poisoning the other kids outside the school gates as she wafts up silently in electric mode. Although she might run them over if they don’t hear it coming…

Lego Lexus RX450H

The Lexus RX isn’t really a TLCB sort of car, but nevertheless it looks absolutely stunning in Model Team form thanks to previous bloggee dgustafsson1317 of Flickr. A superbly accurate model, dgustafsson’s creation recreates the big SUV’s rather complex shape beautifully thanks to some ingenious parts usage that is further enhanced by custom badging and wheels.

Lego Lexus RX450H

The model also includes working suspension, drive and steering that are remotely controlled via bluetooth, and LED headlights. There’s a whole lot more to see of dgustafsson’s incredible Lexus RX450h at his Flickr album – click the link above to waft up to school gates. Just don’t run over any kids.

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Christmas Carnage

Lego RC Tank

With only two days until Christmas most of the Elves here at The Lego Car Blog have returned to the crumbling ruin that is TLCB Towers ready for their enforced ‘break’ over the holidays. This makes the office a noisier and messier place in the build up to their re-caging, and is something we’ve gotten used to over the years, but nothing prepared us for just how much noisier and messier this year would be.

With the office stereo playing Christmas songs loudly on loop we weren’t paying attention to any sounds emitting from the Elves’ cage room or the corridor outside. Mistake.

When we finally did notice that something was amiss, the Elven casualties were higher than anything that had gone before. There were Elves squashed into the carpet, Elves staggering around in circles, and even Elves unconscious on the top of shelves. One Elf though, was probably the happiest we have ever seen an Elf be, and it was at the controls of This.

‘This’ is shadow_elenter‘s ‘Transforming Tank / Howitzer’, a fully remote controlled, eighteen motor and five SBrick behemoth that can do, well… a lot. Take a look via the video below and you’ll understand how the situation here at TLCB Towers unfolded…

With an amazing Howitzer gun capable of deploying remotely and firing a Technic rubber-ended bullet (complete with re-coil), four remotely firing cannons up front, remotely controlled (but non-firing) gatling and anti-aircraft guns, and huge tracks driven by four Power Functions XL Motors, shadow_elenter’s tank is an incredible (if mad) example of the very best Technic engineering.

There’s much more to see of this gloriously unhinged build at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, whilst we undertake a big Christmas tidy up…

Lego RC Tank

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Beast Mode

Lego Technic Rezvani Beast Alpha

Here at TLCB we’re yet to be convinced by any of the multitude of supercar start-ups founded upon the dreams (and little else) of millionaires.

Routinely released in ‘digital concept form’ (i.e. they don’t exist), these affronts to engineering are invariably touted to have somewhere near a zillion horsepower and a 300mph top speed, despite being based upon bits of old Lotus and someone else’s engine, and are usually named by someone with a mental age of four.

Today’s start-up supercar manages a clean sweep of the above, being based on the Lotus Elise or Ariel Atom, using a Honda or Cosworth engine, and bearing the name ‘Rezvani Beast Alpha’. TLCB’s scepticism remains undimmed…

Still, this Technic recreation of the $200K re-bodied Ariel Atom is something to behold. Built by previous bloggee Lachlan Cameron (who also built the cars found in the two links above) this Lego Rezvani Beast Alpha is a properly fine Technic Supercar, featuring remotely controlled steering and drive, working suspension, opening doors, and front and rear LED lights, amongst a host of other functions.

There’s more to see of Lachlan’s Rezvani Beast via both Flickr and the Eurobricks forum – click the links to jump to the complete gallery of images and build specs.

Lego Technic Rezvani Beast Alpha

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LEGO Technic 2019 | Set Previews!

Hot on the heels of our 2019 Speed Champions line-up preview and the awesome looking Technic 42096 Porsche 911 RSR set scooped here last month, it’s time to reveal the rest of what our Elves found during their traditional Christmastime sneak around The LEGO Company’s HQ. Yup, today we can share the complete H1 2019 LEGO Technic range!

42088 Inspection Lift

Lego Technic 42088 Set

The entry point to the Technic range for 2019, 42088 is aimed at builders aged just 7+, with 155 pieces and a sub-£10 price tag. As has become the norm for Technic sets even at this scale, 42088 features a bit more visual detail than the range has historically used, but pleasingly it still features a lovely crane boom mechanism that utilises a worm gear to provide elevation. A tow truck B-model deploys the parts to achieve the same function and we think either build is a fine way to kick-off Technic for a younger builder.

42091 Police Pursuit & 42090 Getaway Truck

LEGO Technic 42091 Box

Unlike these two…

42091 and 42090 are the usual two pull-back motor powered sets that join the Technic range each year. Like past years they feature absolutely nothing beyond their pull-back motorisation and, like past years, they are somewhat aesthetically challenged, despite the inclusion of a wealth of colourful stickers. Each set contains around 120 pieces and the two models can be combined to create something even more hideous should you feel the need to. 42091 and 42090 will sell very well we suspect, but if you’re going to buy a child an entry point into Technic, you could do so much better…

Lego Technic 42090 Box

42089 Power Boat

LEGO Technic 42089 Set

For less money than either of the two monstrosities above you could have this; a rather excellent looking power boat, complete with a working single cylinder engine that spins the propellor as the boat is pushed along. 174 pieces, some neat stickers, and a hydroplane B-model complete the reasons why 42089 is vastly better than the Getaway Truck and whatever that police thing is supposed to be, and it’ll reach stores in January.

42092 Rescue Helicopter

LEGO Technic 42092 Box

Arriving just in time to rescue countless amateur snowboarders this ski season comes 42092, the only aircraft in the 2019 Technic line-up. With just over 300 pieces, 42092 increases the number of working functions whilst retaining an 8+ target age, with working main and tail rotors, a functioning winch, opening side and tail doors, and featuring the usual colourful stickers. 42092 is also sort-of-mini-figure-scale, and includes a stretcher piece originally found in the Town range with which to evacuate broken snowboarders. A slightly odd jet plane B-model can also be built, but that can’t rescue anyone. Get your hands on 42092 when it lands in January.

42093 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1

LEGO Technic 42093 Chevrolet Corvette ZR1

Continuing LEGO’s genius decision to partner with real-world auto-makers comes 42093, a 579-piece Technic version of Chevrolet’s mighty Corvette ZR1. Working steering and a miniature V8 engine make appearances, and 42093 uses bricks to replicate the Corvette’s shape rather than just stickers (although these are present) which we rather like too. A hot rod forms the B-model and we expect 42093 to cost around £35/$40 when it reaches stores next year.

42095 RC Stunt Racer

Lego Technic RC Stunt Racer 42095

Dropping two-hundred pieces but adding Power Functions motors, an IR receiver, and a controller is 42095, a very weird (but probably very fun) ‘Stunt Racer’. Each of the two large motors separately powers one of 42095’s tracks, giving the model skid-steering and likely excellent cat/Elf chasing ability. A B-model so similar we wonder why LEGO bothered can also be built, and you’ll be able to terrorise your pets for around £75/$80 from January 2019.

42094 Tracked Loader

LEGO Technic 42094 Set

And now for our favourite; 42094 Tracked Loader. With 827 pieces but no motors, 42094 should be good value at around £65/$70 and it includes the most technical sophistication of the H1 2019 line-up. Linear actuators are driven via hand-powered wheels mounted at the rear of the loader, controlling the boom elevation and grabby claw up front. 42094 also includes suspended tracks, a rear winch, a rotating cabin, and a B-model that looks very nearly as good as the main vehicle. 42094 looks to be great addition to the 2019 Technic line-up and may even give that Porsche 911 RSR a run for our money.

Which is your favourite new Technic set of 2019? Let us know in the comments, and you can read our reviews of dozens of LEGO’s past Technic sets via the Set Review Library here.

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Dumped

Lego Technic RC Tipper Truck

It’s nearly Relationship Transfer Deadline Day, the last day before the holidays when a relationship can terminated as ‘no-one likes a Christmas dumping’. Failure to meet this deadline means that you have to stay with your partner until early January so as not to ruin the festive period.

To mark the approach of this infamous day Damian Plesniak has constructed a vehicle capable of a sizeable dumping, a whole 2.5kgs of dumping in fact, thanks to its XL driven linear-actuator tipping bed. Said dump can also be triggered remotely* thanks to LEGO’s infrared system, which also controls the Power Functions 8×4 drive and steering.

There’s more to see of Damian’s excellent RC Technic 8×4 dump truck on both Flickr and at the Eurobricks forum, where you can also find a video of the truck in action. Click the links above to take a pre-Christmas dump.

*Do not use this method in real life. You’re better than that.

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JCB 5CX Wastemaster | Picture Special

Lego Technic JCB Remote Control

Every so often a creation comes along that shifts what we thought possible from LEGO bricks. This is one such creation. Created over the course of a year by Technic-building legend Sariel this is a fully working replica of JCB’s 5CX Wastemaster backhoe, powered by pneumatics, eleven Power Functions motors, and two third-party SBricks.

Lego Technic JCB 5CX Remote Control Underneath the brilliant Technic exterior are nine motors that drive all four wheels, the three-mode steering (two-wheel, all-wheel and crab), backhoe arm rotation and traverse, and powering a combination of pneumatic cylinders and linear actuators to control both the front and rear arms and their respective buckets. A further two motors power the pneumatic ‘remote control’, compressing the air which travels down twelve separate hoses to the model itself.

Lego Technic JCB 5CX Remote Control

A motorised remotely rotating driver’s seat and a suite of LED lights from third-party lighting specialists Brickstuff complete the electronics, making this 2.4kg, 75 stud-long masterpiece one of the most technically advanced Technic creations to date. There is much more to see of Sariel’s amazing remote control JCB at the Eurobricks forum, on Flickr, and at Sariel’s excellent website, you can watch it in action via the video below, and if you’d like to build your own model with many of the features of this one we highly recommend LEGO’s own 42054 Claas Xerion 5000 set, which share its wheels and amazing three-mode steering with Sariel’s fantastic creation.

YouTube Video

 

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