Category Archives: Lego

Flame Grille

A flame paint-job is worth at least 150bhp, according to TLCB maths. That puts it right up there with a supercharger, side pipes and nitrous in TLCB’s list of go-faster things.

Laszlo Torma’s Speed Champions ‘57 Chevy is therefore very powerful indeed, being equipped with at least two of the above.

A brilliant brick-built grille and a pair of appropriately cool looking mini-figures complete the build, and there’s more to see of Laszlo’s flaming Chevy – including a link to building instructions – on Flickr via the link above.

The Other Ferrari

This is not a Ferrari.

The only legitimate son of Enzo, Alfredo “Dino” Ferrari was an engineer at his father’s company until he died in 1956, aged just 24, from muscular dystrophy.

Until his death, Dino had been working on a new 1.5 litre DOHC V6 engine with Vittorio Jano, who had joined Ferrari from Lancia.

Encouraged by Dino, Jano developed the new V6 engine, and upon Dino’s death Enzo Ferrari decided to create a new marque named after his son to take the engine racing.

The ’Dino’ F2 team raced the following year, with the engine subsequently developed for road cars which bore the ‘Dino’ name, including the Dino 246 by Flickr’s Jonathan Elliott pictured here, plus the Lancia Stratos and Fiat Dino Coupe and Spider.

Sadly Dino never saw the engine he pushed for race, and Jano never saw his engine fitted to a Ferrari. He lost his own son as Enzo had, and a year later in 1965 he took his own life.

Enzo finally brought Dino and Jano’s engine in-house for use in Ferrari-branded road cars in 1976, discontinuing the ‘Dino’ marque.

After twenty years, Enzo had allowed his son’s engine home.

Kosmic Kitty

Is it us or is Hello Kitty everywhere? Well now the Japanese humanoid feline is in space too, thanks to Alec Hole. Your thoughts on this development will probably depend upon younger family members’ obsession with the anthropomorphised cat, but – if you can cope – there’s more of Alec’s ‘Hello Kitty Speeder’ to see on Flickr via the link above.

We Are United

This incredible creation is a Boeing 777-(200), as flown by United Airlines, and built over the course of eleven months by Freezeur21 of Flickr.

Constructed in mini-figure scale (which sounds small but makes this massive), Freezeur’s 777 features opening doors, accurate landing gear (which somehow supports the model’s enormous weight), and some properly brilliant decals.

So good is the result you’d be hard-pressed to know this is Lego at first glance, but it is and you can check out more stunning images of Freezeur’s United Airlines Boeing 777-(200) at his photostream. Click the link above to climb on board.

Playing Golf

In the opinion of this TLCB Writer, walking (or riding) around a park in silly trousers is not a sport. Still, when Volkswagen’s naming department decided to choose sports as the theme for their new cars in the 1970s, golf was one of the games they selected, alongside ‘Derby’ and ‘Polo’.

Eight generations later and the Golf is still going strong, and previous bloggee SP_LINEUP has built no less than four of them, all recreated beautifully in small-scale brick form.

There’s more to see of each, including a tasty-looking Mk1 and a 2000s-era R32, at SP’s photostream. Grab your clubs and head to the green via the link above.

Cyber Gull

As if cyberpunk cars weren’t cool enough*, this one has gull-wing doors! Finn Roberts owns the mind behind it, and there’s more to see of this 7-wide concept (and Finn’s other cyberpunk vehicles) on Flickr.

*Is the nerdiest sentence we’ve written for a while.

5-Tons of Pain!

This is the M1083 6×6 ‘Medium Tactical Vehicle’, an Austrian-designed 5-ton military truck produced by Oshkosh for the U.S military.

Built by Flickr’s Evan M, this superb Lego recreation of the M1083 in desert camo spec not only does an excellent job of capturing the truck, and features both working steering and suspension, it also includes 5 tons of exciting exploding things in the load bed.

Talking of ‘capturing the truck’, a few of the real trucks and a great many tons of U.S exploding things are likely now in the hands of the Taliban in Afghanistan. Which makes the war to oust them seem rather pointless. Still, you can capture your own M1083 at Evan’s photostream via the link above!

Ruby Ruby Ruby Ruby*

This splendid 1935 Austin Ruby was found by one of our Elves today, and it features more ingenious (and somewhat sketchy) building techniques than we think we’ve ever seen on one model before.

A stretched rubber band forms the grille, angles are created via the half-attachment of pieces, and the running board/rear wheel arch is attached with string!

Whilst it wouldn’t exactly pass LEGO’s requirements for robustness, the resulting model looks absolutely lovely, and there’s more to see at the photostream of Owen Meschter, who owns the mind behind it.

Click the link above and try not to knock any pieces off…

*Ah-ah-ah-ah-ah-aaah. Today’s title song. Obviously.

The Other F12

Ferrari’s F12 Berlinetta is not the only vehicle to carry the F12 moniker. Volvo Trucks got there first, way back in 1977, and – because we’re a bit weird – we prefer their one…

This beautiful 7-wide Volvo F12 comes from builder Duq, whose recreation of the classic cab-over contains some of the finest detailing we’ve ever seen at this scale, from that wonderful grille and a life-like interior to even a realistic driveshaft.

There’s more to see of Duq’s F12 at both Flickr and Eurobricks, you can check out a rather larger version of the vintage Volvo here, and you can view a model of Ferrari’s (frankly less interesting) namesake by clicking here.

Hall of Armour

The ‘Hall of Armour’ might sound like somewhere in ‘Game of Thrones’ where witchcraft, disembowelling, and incest take place (which is most places in ‘Game of Thrones’), but in this case it’s far more exciting.

Tony Stark (aka Iron Man)’s ‘Hall of Armour’ – effectively the coolest basement ever – contains his tools, equipment, flying mech suits, robotic arms, and – being easily the best Marvel superhero – a few tasty cars too.

This is our favourite, his flame-decalled hot rod roadster, as recreated wonderfully in Speed Champions scale by KosBrick of Flickr.

KosBrick has captured the hot rod from the movie beautifully, plus he’s constructed a variety of items found in Tony Starks ‘Hall of Armour’ too, which are – in place of witchcraft, disembowelling and incest – much more interesting from an engineering perspective.

You can build these for yourself thanks to the building instructions released alongside the stunning imagery, and there’s more to see of KosBrick’s ‘Hall of Armour’ on Flickr. Click the link above to check it out.

White Angles

Back when this TLCB Writer was a boy, LEGO bricks came in exactly three angles; Right, 45°, and Somewhere (half-way?) in Between.

Not so today, where a myriad of wedges are available in numerous widths, lengths, and thicknesses, and it seems previous bloggee Fabrice Larcheveque has deployed every single one of them in his recreation of Lamborghini’s ultra limited-run Reventon.

Inspired by a fellow previous bloggee The G Brix and constructed in 8-wide Speed Champions scale, Fabrice’s Reventon captures the angular aesthetic of the real car brilliantly, and there’s more to see of his collection of wedges here.

Skull and Crossplane

Americans, like TLCB Elves, are excited by decals. There’s the Pontiac Firebird’s Giant Flaming Bird motif, the Ford Mustang’s twin stripes, aircraft with teeth, and many more besides.

Despite this clear appreciation for decal work, that most American of cars – the Chevrolet Corvette – isn’t really famous for any stickers at all.

Fortunately László Torma is here to correct this, by equipping the unloved LS1 crossplane-engined C4 Corvette (see, the title does make sense!) with a giant skull on the hood.

You can also build both the aforementioned skull and the car wearing it at home, as László has made building instructions for his C4 Corvette ‘Skull Edition’ available. Go on, get a boner via the link above!

Cars of Futures’ Past

For reasons unknown, movies depicting cars of the future always seem to choose 1976 as a start point. Still, as the results are sometimes as good as these cyberpunk concepts by Finn Roberts we’re cool with that.

Based on the conceptual designs of Syd Mead – and a Lancia Stratos – Finn’s concepts capture the retro-futuristic nature of cyberpunk film brilliantly, and are part of his wide ranging ‘Cyberpunk’ Flickr album.

There’s more to see of Finn’s two cyberpunk concept cars featured here on Flickr, where a range of other brick-built retro-future machinery can also be found. Take a look via the link above.

Build-a-Countach

Lamborghini have just revealed the new Countach, celebrating 50 years since the original first appeared in concept form and re-wrote the supercar rule book. In looks only of course, as the actual car, when it arrived in 1974, was rather rubbish.

Still, how a car drives is irrelevant when it’s a poster on your bedroom wall, and the Countach fulfilled the bedroom poster brief better than any car before it, or since.

Which makes us rather disappointed that Lamborghini’s ‘new’ Countach looks mostly like every other Lamborghini, and is yet another ultra-limited special edition (just 112 units will be made) costing $2m a piece.

Not that it matters what we think of course, because the new Countach is already sold out.

No, we’ll stick with the old one produced from 1974 until 1990 (by which time it had grown to look rather silly), despite it being a pretty bad car – even by 1970s supercar standards.

Cue Flickr’s barneius, who has recreated one the later (silly) original Countaches – the extravagantly-titled ‘LP5000 Quattrovalvole’ – beautifully in Speed Champions scale.

Clever build techniques are matched by an even cleverer use of black stickers, and there’s more of barneius’s build to see, plus a link to building instructions, at his ‘Lamborghini Countach’ album on Flickr. Click the link above to make the jump.

Old-Timey Police Chase

It’s time for an old-timey police chase! Which would be similar to a modern police chase, only with more “Stop you reprobate, do you hear me? Stop!” type phrases being shouted somewhat politely through a loud hailer, and fewer ‘News’ helicopters broadcasting the unfolding mayhem live to the serially unemployed.

The cars would also likely be much cooler than today’s police chase defaults of battered Dodge pick-ups or 2003 Honda Civics, at least in the mind of this TLCB Writer, and certainly if 1saac W.‘s glorious ’53 Hudson Hornet and ’51 Nash Statesman police car are involved.

Built using only original LEGO pieces and off-cuts from LEGO sticker sheets, 1saac has captured each car beautifully in Speed Champions form, and there’s more to see of both the Hudson and the Nash at his photostream – click the link above to jump downtown in the mid-’50s.