Category Archives: Lego

Not a Car

Lego Supermarine Spitfire

But, in this writer’s opinion, the most beautiful aircraft of the Second World War. This gorgeous Supermarine Spitfire comes from Mike Fifer of MOCpages, and it contains some of the most brilliantly-built colouring of any model we’ve found. It’s not just the superb camouflage you can see in these pictures either, as the underside is rather special too. Click the link above to find out why.

Lego Supermarine Spitfire

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Not a Car

Lego Tug Boat

This beautiful Lego tug boat is not a car, but for reasons unknown this TLCB writer quite like tug boats, and thus it’s appearing here! Built as a commissioned piece by Arjan Oude Kotte it’s an example of exceptional Lego model-making, and there are more superb images to see at Arjan’s album on Flickr. Tug yourself off at the link above.

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Topless CJ

Lego Jeep CJ

Well that’s brought in some clicks. Anyhoo, this neat roof-less Jeep CJ-5 comes from TLCB regular Ralph Savelsberg aka Mad Physicist, and it captures the real off-roader beautifully in his trademark style. There are lots more images of the topless Jeep available on Flickr – click the link above to take a peek.

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Ocean Custodian

Lego RV Calypso Research Boat

Built by TLCB debutant Luis Pena, this is a 1:100 scale replica of the research vessel ‘Calypso’, complete with a helicopter and ‘diving saucer’ submersible vehicle.

The Calypso was originally a US-built wooden-hulled British minesweeper that served in the Mediterranean during the Second World War. Following the Allied victory the ship returned to US hands before being recommissioned as a Maltese ferry.

Within a year however, British millionaire Thomas Loel Guinness purchased the ship and gave it to the diving pioneer, film-maker, conservationist and adventurer Jacques-Yves Cousteau for use as a marine research vessel, a role the Calypso fulfilled for five decades. During an incredible half-century of oceanic exploration Cousteau and the Calypso made numerous discoveries, including the wreck of the HMHS Brittanic sunk during the First World War, the ability of marine mammals to use echolocation, and halted the dumping of radioactive waste in the Mediterranean Sea.

In 1996, almost fifty years after it entered service with Cousteau, the RV Calypso was accidentally rammed by a barge in Singapore and it sunk in the harbour. A week later the ship was raised and transferred to a shipyard, however Jacques-Yves Cousteau died the following year of a heart attack aged 87, and the Calypso was left to rot as various parties fought over the boat’s ownership, its restoration, and unpaid bills.

Today the ship, which has featured in film, documentaries, song, and even has a namesake in Star Trek, is still quietly dissolving in a shipyard in France, a victim of mankind’s inability to put progress over profit. However Cousteau’s legacy remains almost unfathomably huge, and continues to today via the environmental protection foundation that he created which now numbers over 300,000 members.

This beautiful homage to a ship which as done probably more than any other can be found in greater detail at Luis’ photostream on Flickr, and includes both above and below the waterline versions (each pictured here). There’s more to see via the link above, and you can read more about the Cousteau Society that continues Jacques-Yves’ work today by clicking here.

Lego RV Calypso Research Boat

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B-Model

Lego Ford Model B Hot Rod

This lovely hot rodded ’32 Ford Model-B ‘3 window’ coupe appeared on Flickr over the weekend, built by previous bloggee Jonathan Elliott. Featuring some very cunning parts orientation there’s more to see at Jonathan’s photostream – click the link above to make the jump.

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Star Citizen

Lego SHIPtember Brutus spaceship

Ah SHIPtember, another tenuously-titled sci-fi month within the online Lego community of which we know absolutely nothing. Well, apart from that the ‘SHIP’ bit of the annual wordplay means ‘Seriously Huge Investment in Parts’.

Stephan Niehoff can surely attest to that with this incredible, and absolutely enormous, 118 stud long behemoth, the ‘AC 240 Brutus’ gunboat. Created in stunning detail the Brutus apparently belongs in the Star Citizen Universe, which is sadly another subject about which we know absolutely nothing.

As you can tell, we suck at sci-fi. Fortunately the other Lego blogs are far nerdier than TLCB so you can expect full details and an elaborate back-story to appear elsewhere before long. In the meantime you can check out Stephan’s remarkable build on Flickr – click the link above to go for a good long SHIP.

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Water Bomb

Lego Canadair CL-215

Ah Canada. The United States’ slightly boring neighbour. Home of singing-horse Celine Dion, the catchy pop of Carly Ray Jepsen, and perennial annoyance that is Justin Bieber. Fortunately they also know how to make some cool stuff up there, thanks almost entirely to transportation giant Bombardier.

Founded in the 1930s Bombardier began by making snowmobiles, and have since expanded to build ski-doos, trains, ATVs and aircraft. It’s the latter we have here, in the form of a Canadair CL-215 water-bombing amphibious plane. Designed in the late 1960s to operate at low speeds and in tricky winds, the CL-215 was sold to eleven countries for fire-fighting and search and rescue operations, with 125 units produced until the design was replaced in 1990.

This lovely replica of the Canadair CL-215 comes from previous bloggee Dornbi of Flickr and he’s captured the unusual shoulder-mounted engine configuration of the aircraft brilliantly. There’s more of the build to see at Dornbi’s photostream – click the link above to drop the world’s biggest water bomb.

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Blue Snake

Lego AC Cobra

The second best Anglo-American collaboration (after Fleetwood Mac of course), the AC Cobra has become a car of legendary status. Based on the pretty but humble AC Ace, American racer-turned-tuner Carroll Shelby brokered a deal with Ford to supply their new Windsor V8 engine to the small British company. A giant killer was born, and today the AC Cobra is one of the most sought-after road-racers ever produced. This beautifully replicated Lego version is the work of TLCB regular Ralph Savelberg and there’s more to see of his miniature Cobra on Flickr – click here to make the jump.

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Chinese Whispers

Lego J-11B Fighter

China’s home-grown vehicles often seem to have been ‘designed’ via a game of Chinese Whispers, starting with a respectable Western, Japanese or Korean product, and ending with a tragically distorted lookalike such as this. Or this. Or this. Or this.

Make no mistake though, whilst we’re happily mocking China’s complete disregard for copyright infringement, Chinese cars will be arriving on mass very soon, and it won’t be long before we’ll all be flying on Chinese-designed aircraft too.

In the meantime it’s the domestic market that China’s vehicle and aircraft manufacturers are serving with their cloned produce, as is the case with today’s creation. This is a Shenyang J-11B fighter, a licensed copy of the mid-’80s Soviet-designed Sukhoi Su-27 air superiority fighter, and currently in sole use by the People’s Liberation Army Air Force of China.

This spectacular Lego replica of the Shenyang J-11B comes from Flickr’s Lennart C and it’s a better copy than any of China’s cars could hope to be. There’s an opening cockpit, detailed landing gear, as well as an assortment of cloned Russian weaponry, and there’s lots more to see at Lennart’s photostream via the link above.

Lego Shenyang J-11

Or this.

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Chevy Stepside

Lego 1957 Chevrolet 3100 Stepside

This gorgeous 1957 Chevrolet 3100 Stepside pick-up truck comes from TLCB Master MOCer and frequent bloggee Ralph Savelsberg aka Mad Physicist. With opening doors and hood revealing a detailed interior and engine, Ralph’s classic Chevy is just as detailed on the inside, and there’s more to see at his photostream via the link above.

Lego 1957 Chevrolet 3100 Stepside

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McLaren in Miniature

Lego McLaren 720S

We don’t often blog small scale vehicles here at TLCB, but RGB900‘s Speed Champions style McLaren 720S has captured the British supercar’s unusual shape brilliantly. We think it’s better than LEGO’s official McLaren 720S set, and there’s more to see on Flickr via the link above.

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Monkeying Around in the Arctic

Tammo S.‘s colourful sci-fi hovercraft has run into some problems in the snow. Indeed snowflakes from the crash-landing still spatter its windscreen. Fortunately the pilot has found a nicely-shaped chunk of Lego ice floe to land on. He’s come prepared with a cooking stove and tools to fix the fault too. If he really gets stuck, he can always shelter in the well appointed cockpit that has been provided with lots to read and unusually, a potted plant.

Click here to see more details. Alternatively, as it’s sci-fi on The Lego Car Blog, click here for today’s tenuous link to British pop music.

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Mighty Meteor

Lego Gloster Meteor

The Gloster Meteor is one of this writer’s very favourite aircraft. And that’s probably the nerdiest line ever said in human history. Anyway, it is. Because look at it.

The Meteor was the Allies first jet-powered aircraft, and the only one to enter service during the Second World War. Powered by two Rolls-Royce Welland turbojet engines designed by the engineering genius Sir Frank Whittle, the meteor became the fastest aircraft of the time, breaking numerous speed and climbing records.

The Meteor was flying on the very edge what what was achievable in the 1940s, and thus hundreds of the aircraft (and the pilots that flew them) were lost to accidents, mechanical failures and fuel starvation (the Meteor could only fly for an hour at most). However, the Meteor was also fast enough to catch and destroy the V1 flying bomb in flight, and destroyed 46 German aircraft on the ground by the end of the war. The Meteor wasn’t permitted to fly over land in German occupation though, so great was the fear of the aircraft being captured and its secrets being learned.

After the war the incredible rate of jet aircraft development meant the Meteor quickly become obsolete, ending its days as a target tug, but without the Meteor’s pioneering technology it could have been many more years before jetting off on holiday became a realistic possibility for millions of people.

This beautiful recreation of a the Gloster Meteor in Royal Danish Airforce livery comes from previous bloggee Henrik Jensen, and it captures the iconic shape of the real aircraft brilliantly. There’s more to see of Henrik’s build at MOCpages and Flickr where Henrik has made the internal secrets of his model available to view. Even if you’re German.

Lego Gloster Meteor

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Remote Control

Normally a mixture of Elves and remote control vehicles heralds chaos and destruction across The Lego Car Blog’s offices. Fortunately this excellent model from Arran Hearn lacks the Power Functions that our workforce require for “fun”. It’s left to us to enjoy the look of the build and neat connections that make its shock absorbers. As well as the control unit in the background of the photo, Arran has built a full-sized radio control unit in Lego. Click on the link in the text to see Arran’s work or click here for today’s British pop song in the title.

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Hot Copper

Lego Steampunk Hot Rod

This delightfully whimsical steampunkesque hot rod comes from perennial bloggee Redfern. With a V12 engine up front and copper detailing in abundance it looks to be just the vehicle for a vulgarian gentleman. There’s more to see on Flickr – click here to make the jump.

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