Tag Archives: porsche

Pair o’Porsches

We often publicise huge billion-brick creations here at The Lego Car Blog, but you really don’t need a collection larger than Legoland to make something awesome. Demonstrating this beautifully is Mc Brickster, who is making his TLCB debut with a pair of gorgeous Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0 RS racing cars, complete with period-correct decals and slot-car slick tyres. Each has been photographed brilliantly and there’s more to see at Mc Brickster’s photostostream via the link above.

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This gorgeous creation comes from TLCB regular Simon Przepiorka, and it’s a 1:24 replica of the Porsche 935 in K3 specification. The 935 was launched in the mid-’70s and raced successfully well into the 1980s, with perhaps its greatest moment being a remarkable Le Mans 24 Hour victory in 1979, where the 935 beat even the prototype racing cars in the pouring rain to take the outright win. Simon’s superb Lego replica captures the 935 K3 brilliantly and there’s more to see on Flickr via the link above.

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Green ‘Gator

Lego Porsche Cayman R

OK, a cayman isn’t quite an alligator, but they are both green. Or something. Anyway, here’s a most excellent Porsche Cayman R in a retena-searing lime green, and it looks the business. Built by TLCB regular Simon Przepiorka (who is due here tomorrow too with something very cool) it’s a superb recreation of Porsche’s fastest mid-engined coupe, which is no easy feat given the shape of the real car. Cunning techniques abound and there’s more to see on Flickr via the link above.

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How to Build Dream Cars | Book Review

How to Build Dream Cars with LEGO Bricks

There’s one question we get here at The Lego Car Blog more than any other; ‘Can I have instructions?’. Mattia Zamboni, author of the previously reviewed ‘Tiny LEGO Wonders‘ and previous bloggee ZetoVince have decided to respond to the call, and recently sent us their latest book that claims to provide the answers…

Thunderbay Press’s ‘How to Build Dream Cars with LEGO Bricks‘ aims “to deliver accurate car models of epic cars”, and it really does feature some epic cars. From legendary American classics like the Ford GT40, Dodge Charger and Corvette Stingray, through European supercars such as the Lamborghini Countach and Porsche 911, to modern-day exotic hypercars like the Pagani Zonda.

Lego Porsche 911 Instructions

Epicocity achieved then, but how about accuracy? Well Mattia is so confident in the realism of the builds within ‘How to Build Dream Cars’ that the contents page doesn’t name them, or even feature colour, instead showing simply black and white renders of each of the models featured. It works too, creating a beautifully clean look that is maintained throughout the book.

The models are indeed instantly recognisable, at least for car fans which we suspect you’ll be if you’re reading this. LEGO’s own Speed Champions sets are too of course, and we’ve loved seeing each new release in this line-up as LEGO create more partnerships with real-world car manufacturers. However there are many brands that LEGO have not yet partnered with (and may never), and often the sets can be quite sticker-heavy, making recreation from spare parts at home impossible.

‘How to Build Dream Cars’ manages to accurately recreate some of the world’s best known cars without a single sticker, whilst using more advanced techniques to achieve greater realism than LEGO’s Speed Champions sets. Let’s take a look at how!

How to Build Dream Cars

Each model starts with a description and image of the real car, including the all-important fact sheet that all car fans require. The instructions continue the black and white theme and add colour simply via the bricks used in the build. Like Mattia’s ‘Tiny LEGO Wonders’ book, these are slightly more complicated than those found in an official LEGO set, both because the techniques themselves are, and because LEGO have simplified their own steps, sometimes to the point of adding just one piece at a time.

‘How to Build Dream Cars’ feels more like LEGO instructions did a decade or so ago, being noticeably more advanced, and using more monochrome piece colours. This means that there are few contrasting-colour pieces in hidden places (as LEGO now use to make them easier to find/identify), which is appropriate given most builders will be creating these models from their own parts and black/grey is a safe bet.

How to Build Dream Cars with LEGO Bricks

Ingeniously the book also contains a complete parts list (which can be dropped straight into Bricklink should you need to buy them) and video instructions for each model, accessible via the QR Codes printed inside. This makes creating the models in ‘How to Build Dream Cars with LEGO Bricks’ a properly interactive experience should you wish it to be, and makes us wonder why LEGO haven’t done this themselves.

Graphics are excellent, and whilst black-on-black isn’t quite as easy to follow as LEGO’s white-pages the instructions are well laid out, clear, and printed in high quality, with good visuals for sub-assemblies and piece positioning. Most importantly the results are superb, successfully mixing System and Technic parts to recreate the iconic shapes of some of the world’s most famous dream cars, such as the AC Cobra pictured below.

Lego AC Cobra

LEGO are a roll right now with their ever-expanding line-up of officially licensed vehicles. However there are many more amazing cars out there not yet licensed to become official LEGO sets.

If you’d like to expand your own car collection by building some stunning real-world replicas that LEGO haven’t yet created themselves (and that are more detailed and more advanced to build to boot), ‘How to Build Dream Cars with LEGO Bricks’ fulfils the brief brilliantly. From vintage classics to modern supercars, Mattia and Vince have created an excellent instructional guide to building your own dream cars at home, with enough technical specs and vehicle history to keep car fans happy too.

That the book also contains complete parts lists, video instructions, and looks beautiful is the icing on the cake. Highly recommended.

Visit Brick Passion to buy your copy.

Lego Ford GT40

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Glorious Gulf

Lego Porsche 917K Gulf Racing

Is there a cooler racing livery than Gulf? Probably not, and thanks to the fact that LEGO’s colour palette is ever expanding (just like your Mom), it’s one that is now buildable from our favourite Danish bricks.

Previous bloggee Greg998 has done just that, with this gorgeous 1970 Gulf-Racing Porsche 917K, resplendent in the oil company’s famous blue and orange livery (with a few custom decals too), under which is a wonderfully detailed flat-12 engine.

The Gulf Racing Porsche 917Ks didn’t actually win Le Mans in 1970 (that honour went to the sister Porsche-Salzburg team), but we know which car looked the coolest…

See more of Greg’s brilliant Porsche 917K on Flickr via the link above.

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42096 Technic Porsche 911 RSR | Set Preview

42096 LEGO Technic Porsche 911 RSR

It’s that time of year again! No, not the fast approaching scourge of Black Friday, but the time when a crack team of TLCB Elves are dispatched on a dangerous mission to The LEGO Company’s HQ, tasked with uncovering the brand new Technic sets.

Those that make it back (there are guard dogs…) are hailed as heroes – at least for a couple of days until everyone forgets about them again – and we get to bring you LEGO’s new releases in detail. Today we’re delighted to reveal the first new Technic set for 2019, and it’s an absolute cracker!

Continuing LEGO’s brilliant line of officially licensed sets is 42096, Porsche’s mad 911 RSR racer. Noticeably smaller than LEGO’s previous Technic 911 effort, 42096 brings the previous Speed Champions 911 RSR from set 75888 into the Technic range. Aimed at ages 10+ 42096 contains 1,580 pieces (a few of which are new) and features a flat-6 engine, working steering, a detailed cockpit, and a wealth of authentic decals.

42096 is perhaps a bit short on technical functions when compared to past sets of a similar size, and instead continues Technic’s push towards increased visual realism. It’s largely successful too, with the 911 RSR’s difficult shape and unique racing aerodynamic additions pretty well replicated in LEGO form, although the headlights do look a little odd to this writer.

On looks alone 42096 seems to be winner, and with a few working features too it could do rather well. LEGO’s new Technic Porsche 911 RSR set will reach stores early next year and is expected to cost around £120/$140/$170 depending on the market. Until then we’ll continue to bring you LEGO’s new 2019 releases as our Elves return to TLCB Towers with them, and remember that you can read our reviews of the current Technic and past line-ups via the Review Library.

42096 LEGO Technic Porsche 911 RSR

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The Other Porsche 911 GT3 RS

Lego Porsche 911 GT3 RS

LEGO’s official Technic 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS didn’t exactly receive a rave review here at The Lego Car Blog, despite it being probably one of the most iconic LEGO sets of recent times. TLCB Master MOCer Firas Abu-Jaber aims to rectify this lack of a Lego model worthy of the badge, and has recreated Porsche’s famous special-edition 911 in spellbinding beauty in Model Team form.

Taking a month to complete Firas’ 911 GT3 RS uses some amazing techniques to replicate the 911’s famous – and fantastically difficult – bodywork, which includes opening doors, front-trunk and engine cover, whilst the interior is just as well thought out.

There’s much more to see of this incredible Porsche 911 GT3 RS at Firas Abu-Jaber’s photostream. Click here to make the jump to the full gallery of stunning images, and click here to read Firas’ interview as part of The Lego Car Blog’s Master MOCers series.

Lego Porsche 911 GT3 RS

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75887 Speed Champions Porsche 919 Hybrid | Review

Lego 75887 Speed Champions Porsche 919 Hybrid

It’s Review Time here at The Lego Car Blog, and for those of you who’ve been reading reviews of LEGO’s large expensive sets and wondering ‘But what about something I can afford?’, this one is for you!

75887 is another result of LEGO’s tie-up with Porsche, which most famously brought us the 42056 Technic 911 GT3 RS set. Aimed at ages 7+, measuring just 6-studs wide, and costing around $15/£12, 75887 is a very different offering to the enormous 911, but it’s no less authentic.

Based upon Porsche’s Le Mans winning 919 Hybrid racing car, 75887 is a mini-figure scale homage to the race-winner, complete with an accurately printed mini-figure driver, a traffic light pole, a laptop piece, and a lot of stickers. We’ll come on to those in a bit…

The build itself takes only around 20 minutes, and includes some lovely SNOT techniques to create the smooth, almost studless aesthetic. As always the instructions are beautifully clear, if a bit over-simplified as has become the way with them these days, and they utilise a few odd-coloured pieces in hidden places, presumably to make the images easier to follow. There’s nothing wrong with that of course, as it possibly means builders will acquire a wider range of parts in their collection quicker, but was it really that taxing when everything was black or grey in the old days?

The resultant shape is pretty good, with any strange colours perfectly hidden from view, and a wide array of curves, bows and tiles used to recreate the 919’s bodywork with reasonable accuracy. The authenticity is further enhanced by no less than twenty-four separate stickers, some of which are no bigger than a stud, and the placement of which takes up around half of the 20 minute build-time.

Applying these may be a little tricky for those at the younger end of 75887’s age range, and to be honest the set probably doesn’t need all of them, but it’s nice that LEGO went all-in!

After much peeling, placing and sticking you’ll have really rather lovely replica of the Porsche 919 Hybrid, (even if it’s a bit stumpy when compared to the real car), that can be zoomed beautifully across a desk and will survive the inevitable plummet to the floor intact to boot.

75887 is probably not the most accurate officially-licensed vehicle in the Speed Champions range, but it’ll be good enough for the target audience, it’s a fun (and reasonably technical) build, and if you like stickers (and what 7 year old doesn’t?) it has them in abundance! A worthwhile starter set, 7/10.

Lego 75887 Porsche 919 Review

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Red or White Sir?

Lego Porsche 911 Speed Champions

Good things come in the options of red or white. Meat. Wine. And now classic Porsches. These two brilliant Porsche 911 RWB wide-bodies are the work of Simon Przepiorka. Each captures the Japanese-tuned 911 perfectly in miniature and includes opening doors, engine cover, and even a tiny brick-built flat-6. See more at Simon’s photostream – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Porsche 911 Speed Champions

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1970 Porsche 917K | Picture Special

Lego Technic Porsche 917K Le Mans 1970

The year is 1970, and Porsche need to win some races. Their new 917 endurance racer proved hugely unstable in 1969, with downforce still a relatively new phenomenon harnessing it was still largely experimental.

Cue chief engineer John Horsman, and an unlikely revelation caused by the splattering of bugs on the Porsche’s bodywork. John noticed that the 917’s tail was clean from insects, meaning that air wasn’t reaching it. A hasty modification with some aluminium sheets was made to the cars, and the 917 was transformed.

Lego Porsche 917 Gulf Racing

The newly modified 917K won all but one race in the 1970 endurance championship, taking first and second at Le Mans and, along with the Porcshe 908, relegating Ferrari to fourth place.

The 917 was run by serval works and part-works teams in the early 1970s, and it dominated sports car racing. The most famous of these are perhaps the Gulf Racing cars, thanks largely to Steve McQueen and his 1971 film ‘Le Mans’.

It’s this car that Technic building legend Sariel has chosen to recreate in Lego form, and he’s done so brilliantly.

Lego Porsche 917 Gulf Racing

Underneath the incredible bodywork (which includes wonderful period-correct decals) are no less than four LEGO RC Buggy Motors, with two third-party BuWizz 2.0 bricks controlling a pair each. This gives Sariel’s Porsche 917K both amazing speed and the ability to be controlled remotely via a bluetooth device.

Sariel’s 917 also features fully-independent double-wishbone suspension both front and rear, dihedral opening doors, and remote control steering that turns the steering wheel in the authentically detailed cockpit too.

Lego Porsche 917K Gulf Racing

It’s one of the finest Technic supercars of 2018 and one that is definitely worth a closer look. An extensive gallery of images is available to view at Sariel’s Porsche 917K Flickr album and you watch a video of the model in action and join the discussion courtesy of the Eurobricks forum.

See more of Sariel’s astonishing Technic recreation of the greatest endurance racer of the 1970s via the links above, and you can watch the original trailer for the 1971 movie ‘Le Mans’ by clicking here.

Lego Porsche 917 Sariel

 

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2,733

Lego Porsche 911

Jonathan Elliott’s brilliant Porsche 911 design has appeared here before, but a shot showing it in three variants – including a gorgeous new Singer-esque commissioned piece – was too good to pass up! Plus today’s title gives us a tenuous link to this. See more on Flickr by clicking here.

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Fuji ’88

Lego Porsche 962

The All Japan Sports Prototype Championship (JSPC) was one of the world’s wilder race series. Running from the early ’80s to the early ’90s it pitched various classes of endurance racers against one another on Japan’s fastest circuits. Porsche dominated the series, winning seven of the eleven Championships, with Nissan, Toyota and BMW taking the remaining four.

The Porsche 962 proved the car to beat, and yesterday’s Guest Blogger Prototyp has built three of the 962s that raced in the 1988 Fuji race. Each features the livery from a different team running the Porsche 962 in the late ’80s and there’s more to see of all three versions at Prototyp’s Porsche 962 Flickr album by clicking here.

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Le Mans GTE Pro Grid

Lego Le Mans 2018 GTE PRO Grid

The 24 Hours of Le Mans 2018 is nearly upon us! The world’s greatest endurance race is now in it’s 86th year, and in 2018 will feature sixty cars in four different classes, from the ultra-hi-tech LMP1 prototypes to the GTE Am class of supercars and gentleman drivers.

Somewhere in the middle sits GTE Pro, in which professional drivers for both works and independent teams will fight it out whilst dodging the ludicrously fast LMP1/2 cars hurtling past. This year six different manufacturers have qualified, and previous bloggee Lasse Deleuran has built all six beautifully in Lego form.

There are three Porsche 911 RSRs (featured here previously), two Ferrari 488 GTE EVOs, a Ford GT, a Chevrolet Corvette C7.R, plus the brand new Aston Martin Vantage AMR and BMW M8 GTE.

Each is a fantastic build utilising some ingenious techniques to capture both the complicated GTE-class aero and to accurately recreate the liveries of the teams. Head over to Flickr via the link above to see more of each build and choose your favourite!

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Paint My Porsche

Lego Porsche 911 Le Mans 70th

With nineteen overall wins (plus numerous class victories) Porsche have won the Le Mans 24 Hours more times than any other manufacturer. Over their 70 year history they’ve also raced in some wonderful liveries, advertising everything from fuel to cigarettes to alcohol – basically all the cool stuff.

To mark their 70th year Porsche will be fielding three of their iconic past liveries in the GTE Pro class at this year’s Le Mans 24 Hours race. Flickr’s Lasse Deleuran has recreated each in Lego form, applying them to his previous Porsche 911 RSR design, and they look incredible! Head over to Lasse’s photostream via the link above and pick your winner!

Lego Porsche 911 Le Mans 70th

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Teutonic Targa

Lego Porsche 911 Targa

You don’t need a million LEGO bricks to see your builds appear here at The Lego Car Blog. Jonathan Elliott has used just a few hundred (in one of LEGO’s fetching new hues) to construct this lovely Speed Champions scale classic Porsche 911 Targa. Jonathan has an impressive garage of similarly cool cars available to view and there’s more to see of them and the Porsche featured here at his Flickr photostream. Click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Porsche 911 Targa

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