Tag Archives: 1990s

Orange Squash

The Lego Car Blog Elves are, we think, immune to the Coronavirus. Not that we’d really care, but the little turds could bring it into TLCB Towers, so it’s a relief to know their DNA is sufficiently different from ours. Which shouldn’t really be a surprise looking at them.

However, whilst they can’t catch the deadly respiratory disease, they can still cause carnage amongst their own kind, as was proven today by one of their number at the controls of this; apachaiapachai‘s ‘Tangerine’ Technic rally car.

Powered by a single L Motor, but boosted by a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery providing up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own system, apachai’s creation is ludicrously fast, with the Elves caught on the floor no match for its speed.

Fortunately it’s also quite a low, so before long several were wedged underneath and the rampage was brought to an end, but not before quite a lot of Elven bodily fluids had got onto the carpet.

We could be mad at apachai for that, but a) it’s not his fault our workers are hell-bent on annihilating one another, and b) his creation is so damn cool! Looking like a mashup of many late ’80s – early ’90s rally cars, and with opening doors, hood and a roll cage inside it’s not just a riot to drive but looks thoroughly excellent too.

That said, we are going to have a go driving it (once we’ve wiped the front clean), so whilst we do that you can take a look at apachai’s remote control Technic rally car at the Eurobricks forum via the link above, where you can also find a video showing just how quick this thing is!

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Red Rice

We’re not sure where the term ‘ricer’ came from in America, but today it’s defined as ‘Race Inspired Cosmetic Enhancements’, which means it seems to have transcended any xenophobic origins and can be used to describe any car modified in a ‘ricey’ way.

What we do know is that three favourites recipients of the term, at least according to the internet, are the Toyota Supra (specifically the Mk4 variant), the Mitsubishi Lancer Evo, and the Honda Civic, each of which has been recreated brilliantly in lightly-riced form by TLCB regular SP_LINEUP.

Each includes opening doors and hood, plus a detailed interior and engine bay, and some can be bought from SP in kit form too. Click the link above to visit SP’s photostream to see more of each build and the rest of his extensive back-catalogue.

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Life-Size Britten V1000 Motorcycle

New Zealand doesn’t have much of an indigenous vehicle industry, but it’s a country that does love racing, and in the 1990s a small team from Christchurch formed a company and decided to build their own racing motorcycle. And it was incredible.

The Britten V1000 became one of the greatest racing motorbike designs of all time, pioneering carbon fibre extensively (this is before the McLaren F1), double wishbone front suspension, a frameless chassis, and even engine data logging.

Ten V1000s were produced, with the bike setting multiple speed and race records during the 1990s, including the highest top speed at the Isle of Man TT in 1993 and the fastest standing start mile under 1000cc, at over 200mph.

It’s quite a machine then, and so when certified LEGO Professional Ryan McNaught and his team of model makers were commissioned to build something for an Aukland-based client they chose to build this Kiwi icon of racing.

An exact 1:1 scale replica of one of the ten real Britten V1000s motorbikes, Ryan (aka The Brickman) and his team have used LEGO pieces to recreate every aspect of the record-setting bike, including the fantastically intricate exhaust and rear shock springs that make our head hurt just looking at them.

This amazing build will go on display at Toyco 2020 in New Zealand, so if you’re reading this from Aukland go and check it out! For the rest of our readers you can head to Ryan McNaught’s ‘Britten V-1000’ Flickr album to see more of this spectacular life-size replica.

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Bugatti in Bricks

Bugatti haven’t always made Veyrons and Chiron’s under the directorship of the Volkswagen Empire. We’ve written about their historic limousines and racing cars here, but there was a weird period in the middle where they were owned by an Italian entrepreneur and they made this; the V12 quad-turbo-charged EB110. Launched in the early ’90s just 139 EB110s were produced before the company folded in 1995. Micheal Schumacher bought one.

Not enough super-wealthy individuals did though, leading to the Bugatti factory being bought by a furniture maker and their sister brand Lotus being sold to Proton. Still it all worked out in the end as Volkswagen purchased the defunct brand in 1998, used it to set about making the world’s fastest production car, and the rest is history.

Fabrice Larcheveque remembers the weird period though, building this fabulous Speed Champions interpretation of Bugatti’s early ’90s oddity. He’s captured the unique-looking supercar superbly too, and you can see more of his 8-wide EB110 at his Flickr album by clicking here.

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The Answer’s Always Miata

Whatever the question, the answer is always Miata. Or MX-5 if you’re not American. Or Eunos if you’re in Japan. But you get the point. Light, reliable, fast enough, and able to go sideways, the Miata/MX-5/Eunos is very probably the greatest sports care ever made. This is SP_LINEUP‘s Speed Champions scale recreation of the second generation of Mazda’s iconic two seater roadster, and it captures the look of the real car beautifully, with opening doors, hood and a removable roof too. SP has made instructions for his design available should you wish to build your own and you can find these and further images at his photostream via the link above.

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Flying Dolphin

The Lego Car Blog Elves have never met a dolphin, and thus they have little knowledge of what one looks like. The naming department of Eurocopter must only have had a loose idea too, because the clever aquatic mammals definitely don’t have rotors. Still, we suppose the barracuda doesn’t have wheels and that provided a cool car name for Plymouth.

The Eurocopter HH-65 does have a sort-of-dolphinish nose though, recreated here in superb detail by Robson M of Flickr. As well as the nose Robson has successfully replicated the Dolphin’s complex tail rotor, fitted a complete interior (with neat sliding door too), and has enhanced the accuracy with some excellent custom decals.

There’s more to see of Robson’s wonderfully realistic Eurocopter HH-65 Dolphin at his photostream – click the link above to watch it do a backflip for some fish.

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Heyday

TVR and MOCpages have much in common. Unreliable yet much loved, they both enjoyed a glorious peak and then slipped into obscurity.

But there is hope.

TVR has a new owner and a new car on the way designed by McLaren F1 legend Gordon Murray, whilst MOCpages can, if the moon is in the right place and the servers are working, still reveal an absolute gem. This is one, created by a builder prolific during the site’s heyday, and it’s a car from TVR’s glorious mid-90’s heyday too.

Nick Barrett built this lovely TVR Griffith as a commission for an owner of the real thing, and he’s captured the British sports car superbly. You can head to MOCpages (if the site is working*) for all the photos, plus you can read Nick’s interview here at TLCB as he now builds Lego models for a job. And it all started on MOCpages.

*Or here if it’s not. Just like a TVR owner, it’s best to have a back-up.

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Horse Race

We get the feeling most Ferrari owners don’t just have one prancing horse in their stable. Regular bloggee Angka Utama doesn’t either, having built a whole herd of historic horses from Ferrari’s ’80s-’90s back catalogue.

Pictured here are a Ferrari 308 GTS, 328 GTS and 348 Testa Rossa, whilst a further classic Mondial cabriolet can also be found at his photostream. Each has been created superbly in 8-wide ‘Speed Champions’ scale, based on an ingenious modular platform, and each includes the cleverest windshield surround – made from a rubber band held under tension – that we’ve ever seen on a vehicle.

There’s more to see of each of Angka’s brilliant Ferrari builds at his Flickr photostream, including this awesome exploded-view image showing how the modular construction and that rubber band windshield surround have been designed. Head to Angka’s stable via the link above to give each horse a ride.

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“You Can Push it Across the Finish Line… Or You Could Tow it”

This car as a lot to answer for. Arriving as a wreck in the first ‘The Fast and the Furious’ movie, prompting Jesse’s quote above, Brian’s MkIV Supra Targa became one of the most famous cars on the planet. At least with fourteen year old keyboard warriors.

‘The Fast and the Furious’ franchise has gone on, nine movies later and counting, to become Universal’s highest grossing franchise. With $15 billion in the bank and an untold number of terrible plot lines to continue (seriously, how many dead characters/bad guys are going to return/turn good and join the team?) it seems Vin Diesel and Dwayne Johnson will have a lot more cheques to cash yet.

The Supra meanwhile, took a (seventeen year) break, but now it’s back too (and has surely got to feature in the next movie?). The aforementioned fourteen year old keyboard warriors hate it, because it’s not the car from the first movie, but by all accounts the MkV Supra is actually bloody good.

Anyway, back to the first film – but far from the first Supra – and Brian’s modified MkIV, recreated here beautifully in Speed Champions-esque style by TLCB regular Simon Przepiorka, complete with the slightly silly livery made famous in the movie, an enormous wing, and whole heck of a bodykit.

There’s more of Simon’s Toyota Supra MkIV from ‘The Fast and the Furious’ to see at his photostream – click the link above to do a 1/4 mile in 10 seconds…

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Rocket Bunnied NSX

When tuning companies take their hammers to supercars they usually get it very wrong (see here, here and here, and try not to be sick), but there is one exception; Rocket Bunny. Founded in Japan by Tops Racing Arts Kyoto, Rocket Bunny kits are produced in a humble little workshop, with careful attention to detail and a few of very ordinary cars parked outside – the very opposite of the flashy (and hideous) European tuners above. The results have become world-renowned, and there are few tuning brands cooler than Rocket Bunny anywhere right now.

This brilliant Lego recreation of a Rocket Bunnied Honda NSX comes from TLCB regular Simon Przepiorka, who has not only captured the brand’s signature look to near perfection, he’s made instructions available so that you can too. Head to Simon’s photostream via the link above for the full gallery and to find the all-important instructions link.

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Nissan Skyline R34 GTR | Picture Special

Is there a car more over-hyped by annoying children than the Toyota Supra? No. But this comes close. It is of course the Nissan Skyline GTR R34, a car made more famous than it already was by a certain once-quite-good-but-now-fudging-terrible movie franchise.

The R34 Skyline launched in 1998, lasting just a few short years into the early 2000s before the GT-R evolved to became a standalone model and Skylines went back to being fairly boring sedans. Power came from a twin-turbo straight-6 making ‘276’ bhp, which was sent to all four wheels via an immensely clever all-wheel-drive system, allowing the GT-R to slay far more expensive machinery at the track and turning average drivers into good ones overnight.

This spectacular Model Team replica of the late-’90s legend comes from TLCB Master MOCer and all-round car building genius Firas Abu-Jaber, who has not only recreated the GT-R R34 perfectly in its stock form but has also added the prerequisite tuning accessories that seem to accompany it, from big wings and bigger turbos to bodykits and NO2 canisters (if you think that should say ‘NOS’ go back to school).

There’s a whole lot more of Firas’s incredible Nissan Skyline GT-R to see at his Flickr album by clicking here, where a link to yes, instructions, can also be found, and a certain blue version from a once-quite-good-but-now-fudging-terrible movie franchise is also due to appear…

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Starship Trooper

This is an Isuzu Trooper, a robust, reliable, bland, Japanese 4×4 from the 1990s. But it is a rather good Technic model and it also allows us to tenuously link to a movie trailer where everything blows up, so there’s that.

This neat Technic version of the Trooper comes from Kent Kashiwabara of Flickr, features working steering, suspension, and opening hood, tailgate and doors, and there’s more to see via the link above.

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Heroes in a Half Shell

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
Heroes in a Half Shell
Turtle Power!

The lyricists of TMNT taking the ‘Batman’ approach to theme-writing there. We’d forgotten that LEGO released a TMNT line back in 2013, which is probably a good thing to be honest. Still, the availability of Turtle-mini-figures has helped Flickr’s Hobbestimus to create this radical LEGO recreation of the Party Bus, complete with Leonardo, Donatello, Michelangelo and Raphael and a host of ninja-based weaponry. Head to the sewers via the link above!

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Party Like it’s 1990

Few cars of the 1990s had as much impact as this one. Honda’s NSX shocked the world upon its launch at the start of the decade. A mid-engined supercar from the makers of the Civic, priced at just over half that of a comparable Ferrari 348. Sure it made ‘only’ 270bhp – a figure beaten by a Hyundai i30 these days – but it weighed little, being the first mass-produced car with all-aluminium bodywork, and the V8-powered Ferrari only had 30bhp more.

Honda continued building the NSX right up until 2005, although only around 18,000 were made in that entire production run. Today the NSX is worth substantially more than the Ferrari it undercut at the time, making it, and many other Japanese icons from the ’90s, properly profitable investments.

Fortunately for those of us who can’t afford the real thing serial bloggee Simon Przepiorka has a brick-built solution in the form of this superb small-scale Lego recreation. Simon has captured the NSX’s aesthetics brilliantly, and there’s even a detailed interior and engine behind the opening doors and engine cover.

There’s more to see of Simon’s fantastic Honda NSX at his photostream – click the link above to make the jump to when Honda were at the very top of their game…

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Electrically Embarrassing

Electric cars have come a long way in recent years. We have Tesla to thank for much of that, along with Nissan, and Toyota of course with their electrification of combustion engines.

However not so long ago electric cars were, frankly, absolutely terrible. The Reva G-Wiz. The Think City. Whatever the hell this is supposed to be. And this, the CityEl / Ellert.

Launched in 1987 the CityEl has a top speed of around 35mph and a range of 30-50 miles from its set of horrible lead-acid batteries and single electric motor. Yup, we said ‘has’ rather than ‘had’, because this automotive embarrassment is still being made. To put that into context purchasing one new today would be like buying a ZX Spectrum computer, an Atari games console, or one of those mobile phones that you had to carry around in a briefcase.

Brickshelf’s gtahelper has made the slightly odd choice to reproduce the CityEl / Ellert in Lego, but he has done a rather excellent job, and has even included a wonderfully ’80s driver to stand alongside it. A full gallery is available to view via the link above, where you can also find a link to instructions should you share gtahelper’s penchant for unfortunate vehicles.

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