Tag Archives: truck

Carrying Cars

We have a happy Elf today, with not one but five finds! Kinda. The bumper haul is courtesy of Thomas Selander and his neat Town-scale Mercedes-Benz car transporter, complete with four 4-wide cars on board. Whilst we decide how many meal tokens this is worth you can check out more of Thomas’ build at his photostream via the link above.

A Canadian in Siberia

Canadians are known for their politeness and generosity. Although that might just be in comparison to their noisy neighbour in the basement. Still, even Canadian inventions demonstrate this altruism, with the country responsible for insulin, the pacemaker, the garbage bag, the electric wheelchair, road lines, and the Wonderbra, all of which – we’re sure you’ll agree – have been massively beneficial to mankind.

Cue today’s creation, a Ural 5920 tracked off-road truck, based on a design shared by the Canadians (of course) in the early 1970s. The Soviets took another decade to copy re-engineer the Canadian design, fitting a Ural 375 cab and starting production the mid-’80s until the collapse of the Soviet Union.

This magnificent fully remote controlled Technic recreation of the Ural 5920 captures the Canadian Soviet tracked truck brilliantly, including the two huge track bogies that swivel thanks to motorised linear-actuators. An XL Motor drives each pair of tracks (plus the V8 piston engine under the hood), and each track wheel is suspended by an individual torsion beam, allowing the model to traverse a landscape as varied (albeit smaller) as that travelled by the real thing.

Previous bloggee Samolot is the builder behind this amazing creation and there’s more to see – including a video of the model in action and detailed photos of the remarkable drivetrain – at the Eurobricks discussion forum, plus the complete image gallery can be viewed via Bricksafe here. Click the links above to head into the wilds of Siberia.

Tipping Tatra

Something remarkable appeared to be occurring today. Following the Elves’ peaceful trundle around the office in the back of an RC flatbed truck a few days ago, one of their number returned with this – Martin Nespor‘s excellent remote control Tatra Phoenix 8×4 truck.

Like the aforementioned flatbed, Martin’s Tatra is too slow to run down any Elves, and thus the Elf at the controls instead offered rides to its compatriots, in a moment of apparent Elven generosity never witnessed before.

Could this be a turning point for Elf-on-Elf relations? Well, no. You see the Elf at the controls had worked out that Martin’s Tatra not only drove and steered via Power Functions motors, but that the container on the back could be tipped too, and had placed thumb-tacks in the corner of the corridor in preparation. Sigh.

A gaggle of Elves was duly driven to the awaiting push-pins and tipped on top of them, before the Elf at the controls ran off in delight.

We now have an enraged mob of Elves prowling the office looking for revenge, which often means another completely innocent Elf will be selected at random to replace the missing perpetrator. Whilst we consider whether Mr. Airhorn will be brought out for his first Elven clearance of the year, you can check out more of Martin’s Tatra Phoenix 8×4 tipper truck on Flickr – click the link above to take the trip.

Flat Share

The Lego Car Blog Elves have been busy since their re-release after the Christmas break, so it was only a matter of time before one of them found a remotely controlled creation. Those you expecting a tale of mass Elven squashings will be disappointed though, as – excellent though this model is – it’s too slow to cause any Elven casualties, much to the annoyance of the Elf that discovered it.

However, now that we have the controls, it can be used to trundle a great multitude of Elves around TLCB Towers, which they’re enjoying very much.

Eurobricks’ damjan97PL (aka damianPLE) is the builder responsible for this rare moment of Elven calm, thanks to his fully RC 50cm long flatbed truck. An L motor provides the drive, a Servo the steering, and an M motor operates the third axle lift system via a clutch.

It’s an excellent build and one that you can create for yourself as building instructions are available, although you probably don’t have any Elves to transport. Head to the Eurobricks discussion forum for all the details.

Mechanical ‘Mog

LEGO’s enormous official 8110 Technic Mercedes-Benz Unimog is a wondrous thing, with an array of motorised functions alongside pneumatics. However, Technic models can be just as engaging even at the smaller, non-motorised end of the scale. Cue TLCB favourite Thirdwigg, who has created this ace Unimog U500 and packed it with functions, despite not a single motor being used in its construction.

Working steering, four wheel drive, suspension, and a four-cylinder engine all feature, as do a front and rear PTO (selectable via a pneumatic switch and turned when the model is pushed along), a front winch, a tilting cab, and a three-way tipping bed, all powered by hand.

There’s more to see of Thirdwigg’s excellent fully mechanical Unimog at his ‘Unimog U500′ album, where a link to a video of the model in action can also be found. Click the link above to take a look!

Double DAF

Here’s a DAF being pulled by another DAF, which makes sense as builder Arian Janssens has appeared here numerous times over the years, usually with a DAF. Arian’s DAF NTT 2800 and DAF FT 2500 share the same brown and orange livery (brorange?), there are custom chromed parts, and giant brick-built ‘DAF’ letters. Because DAF. Head to Arian’s photostream via the link above for these and many other DAFs.

A-Game

Those working in Mercedes-Benz’s commercial vehicle naming department are much better at their jobs than their counterparts in the passenger car division. Whilst Mercedes-Benz cars are just a nonsensical collection of letterstheir trucks all have proper names. Although they must begin with the letter ‘A’ for some reason.

We have two here today, each found on Flickr and each recreating an A-named Mercedes-Benz truck brilliantly in Town(ish) scale.

First up (above) is Fuku Saku‘s exceptional Mercedes-Benz Arocs tipper truck, with detailing equal to what we would expect to find on a Model Team creation several times larger. There’s a superbly lifelike cab, a realistic tipping mechanism, and building instructions are also available. Head to Fuku’s photostream via the link above to take a look.

Today’s second small-scale Mercedes-Benz truck is the work of fellow previous bloggee Keko007, who has recreated the Antos in skip lorry form. Although just six-studs wide, Keko’s model not only looks recognisable, the skip hoist kinda works too, and there’s more to see at his ‘Mercedes Antos 2133 album’. Click the link above to make the skip over to Flickr.

Medium ‘Mog Magnificence

LEGO’s 8110 Technic Mercedes-Benz Unimog set earned a stellar 9/10 review here at The Lego Car Blog. With working steering, suspension, engine, all-wheel-drive with portal axles, Power Functions motors, and pneumatics, it’s one of the finest sets in Technic history. However, as is often the way, you guys can do even better.

This is MajklSpajkl’s Mercedes-Benz Unimog U400, and it’s around half the size of the official 8110 set. And yet, even more incredible functions are squeezed inside.

Like the official LEGO set, MajkleSpajkl’s Unimog features all-wheel-drive with portal axles and three differentials, in this case linked to both a four-cylinder piston engine and an XL Motor that provides the model with drive. A Servo controls the steering, simultaneously turning the steering wheel, whilst a Medium Motor drives both the front and rear power take-offs.

A further L Motor powers a pneumatic compressor for the attachment functions, and can also tilt the rear bed (if fitted) in three directions. We write ‘if fitted’, because as per the real Unimog, MajklSpajkl’s creation can be equipped with a variety of attachments, with a tilting bed, front winch, rear-mounted crane, double-auger gritter, and snow plough variously pictured here.

Both the crane and snow plough movements are controlled via pneumatics, pressurised via the on-board compressor, whilst the PTOs provide motorised drive to the crane’s rotating turntable and outriggers, and the gritter’s rotating dispenser respectively. Not only that, but the cab doors open, the cab itself can tilt, and there’s a front mounted winch option, again motorised via a PTO.

All the above are controlled via a BuWizz Bluetooth battery, allowing the U400 to be operated via mobile phone, and there’s lots more to see of MajklSpajkl’s incredible (and beautifully presented) creation at the Eurobricks forum. Click here to take a closer look at one of the best Technic models of 2020.

What the Frack?

This is a Tatra T815-7 10×10. Plus a few other things.

Built in collaboration across five companies and two continents, this remarkable machine is a mobile fracking rig, capable of extracting shale gas from deep inside the earth. The base is a Tatra T815-7 10×10 off-road truck, powered – in this case – by a six thousand horsepower diesel engine mounted behind the cab.

The reason for all that power is what is you can see at the rear of the vehicle, a GD-2500 Quintiplex well-pump constructed by American pump specialists Gardner Denver – itself rated at 2,500bhp – used to propel a mixture of water, sand and chemicals into the well to force the shale gas to the surface.

The engine powering this pump comes from German company MTU, whose designs are more normally associated with ships than land-based vehicles, with a Czech Talosa auxiliary gearbox allowing the twelve cylinder diesel to drive both the pump and the truck itself.

Cylinder deactivation drops the power for driving the truck, so you don’t have 6,000bhp to play with (although that does sound like it would be fun), with this ‘one engine’ solution and the vehicle superstructure created by engineering company M.G. Bryan Equipment.

It’s an amazing real-world vehicle, recreated here in LEGO form (and to an equally amazing standard) by Pavol Vanek aka Paliason. Measuring a metre long and weighing 8kg, Pavol’s brick-built replica of the M.G. Bryan ‘Percheron’ Tatra T815-7 is a huge creation, and it features a host of impressively engineered features underneath the superbly well executed Model Team exterior.

A complete 10×10 chassis, with nine differentials, full suspension, and steering on the first, second, fourth and fifth axles accurately replicates the real truck, with the steering alone driven by four linear actuators and an XL Motor.

A working twelve-cylinder piston engine sits behind the cab, LEDs illuminate the head and taillights, and there are opening doors and control panel covers.

It’s a phenomenal recreation of a unique real-world vehicle, and there’s loads more of Pavol’s astonishing model to see at both Flickr and the Eurobricks discussion forum. Click here to visit Pavol’s ‘M.G. Bryan ‘Percheron’ – Tatra T815-7 10×10′ album on Flickr, and here to visit Eurobricks where full details of the model, the real truck, and how it is used to frack for shale gas, can be found.

Hook & Tipper

The Elven experiments are continuing here at TLCB Towers, as we move on from hoisting Elves via a remote control forklift to seeing how many can fit inside the container of Vladimir Drozd‘s excellent Scania P440 hook-lift truck.

They are – so far – willing participants, but they’re yet to discover that Vladimir’s model uses a motor-driven liner actuator to tip the container, not that we’re about to use it to tumble them into a washing-up bowl of soapy water…

Four wheel steering, working suspension, a functioning hook-lift, and a drawbar trailer are also included, and you can see more of all of that on Flickr via the link above, whilst we surprise-bath an undetermined number of Elves.

A Good Forking

It’s not all super cars and drag racers here at The Lego Car Blog. Mostly, but not all.

This is Shimon‘s remote control Technic forklift, and it’s excellent. A suite of Power Functions motors deliver drive, steering, lift raising/lowering, and tilt, with the latter two clutched to ensure smooth operation.

Half a kilogram can be lifted, which equates to about four TLCB Elves by our experiments, and there’s more of the model to see on Eurobricks. Get forked via the link above.

Little Red Wagon | Picture Special

It’s 1965, and drag-racers Jim Schaeffer and John Collier have got their hands on a Dodge A100 ‘forward-control’ truck. The pair decided to install a 426 Hemi in the bed, and any non-essential items were removed. The resulting ‘Little Red Wagon’ was the world’s fastest 1/4 mile truck, setting an eleven second time at the first attempt. However, the modifications also tilted the weight bias rearward a bit…

The unintended consequences of this rear-biased weight distribution were a vehicle that proffered to drive only on its back wheels, and in fact the ‘Little Red Wagon’ could complete an entire 1/4 mile race without the front wheels ever touching the ground.

Such crowd-pleasing shenanigans caught the attention of Dodge, who not only used the ‘Little Red Wagon’ in commercials, they all arranged for its purchase by Super Stock Champion Bill Golden to use as the first ‘competition wheelstander’, a class it created single handedly.

Of course having your front wheels in the air limited steering somewhat, and the ‘Little Red Wagon’ crashed in 1969. And 1971. And 1975. That last wreck took the truck out of service, and Golden converted a new truck to continue his wheel standing antics, setting the Guinness World Record for the longest (at nearly 3/4 of a mile!) in 1977 and racing it until his retirement in 2003.

Today a recreation of the ‘Little Red Wagon’ tours alongside the wrecked original, whilst Golden’s own replacement wheel standing truck sold for over $500,000 in 2009.

Flickr’s Brick Flag, who is fast becoming one of our favourite builders here at TLCB, has converted his own Dodge A100 model into a ‘Little Red Wagon’ wheelstander, with his spectacular Model Team version amalgamating the different versions of the real truck that were built over the years.

Superb design, detailing, and decals are evident in abundance and there’s heaps more to see at Brick’s ’60s Dodge Little Red Wagon’ album on Flickr. Click the link above to head down the drag strip on just your back wheels, and here to see the real ‘Little Red Wagon’ in action courtesy of a glorious period video!

Enter Sandman*

We’re not really sure what’s going on here but we expect the cement mixer truck won’t be the same shape by the end. Built by hachiroku24, there’s more to see of ‘Spiderman vs. Sandman’ via the link, where building instructions can also be found!

*Today’s awesome title song.

Holidays Are Com… Wait, What?

It’s the time of year when our TVs are filled with a brightly-lit truck, travelling slowly through American towns distributing soft drinks to happy citizens, and it makes everyone feel a bit more magical.

This is not that truck.

Flickr’s Keko007 has chosen to mark the start of the festive season by resolutely not building the famous Coca Cola Christmas truck, instead building an unadorned trailer for Coke’s rival, pulled by the blandest and most generic European truck that there is, the DAF XF.

Which is not magical at all.

It is a great build though, with one of the best brick-built logos we’ve seen in ages, and there’s more of Keko’s excellent Not-The-Coca-Cola-Christmas-Truck to see at the link above.

I Don’t Want to Live on this Planet Anymore

Half of America believes the other half is lying, a deadly disease is confining us to our homes, and we’re at the tipping point of irreversible and catastrophic climate change (unless you’re in the half of America that thinks this is a lie). Sometimes we just want to give up and escape into the wilderness.

Flickr’s Thesuperkoala is aiding this fantasy today, courtesy of this thoroughly excellent off-road expedition truck, complete with everything needed to leave society behind. Koala’s creation is also fitted with superb working suspension and a full Power Functions remote control drivetrain, including steering, all-wheel-drive, and a high/low gearbox, enabling it to travel far off the beaten track.

It’s just what we need in 2020, and you can join us in imagining we’re a long way from everything at Thesuperkoala’s ‘4×4 Road and Expedition’ album on Flickr, where both this model and an equally good crane/flatbed version are available to view.