Category Archives: Lego

House Spider

Lego Tachikoma

We rather like house spiders. They eat flies and other pests and are a rather elegant design in their own way. Sadly we’re probably in the minority by safely capturing them and releasing them outside TLCB Towers, as most people tend to prefer smushing them. This one would be harder to smush though, and it’s even more useful than its arachnid counterpart. Over to the blurb from the brochure;

“The Yogamabara Mechanization M-400 Multi-Purpose Shell is a commonly used type of shell. It’s very fast and agile. It gives the host AI the ability to follow its client around any ground based environment and has a full range of standard tools, like laser cutter, hydro spanners and standard data sockets to name a few. Its animal-like form gives it personality and this has made Yogamabara one of the biggest manufacturers of Personal AI Shells.”

You can place your order for a new M-400 courtesy of Oscar Cederwall on Flickr. Or alternatively you get get a really big glass and a piece of paper, capture it and release it outside. You know it’s the right thing to do.

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The Boss

Lego Ford Mustang Boss

LEGO’s new 10265 Creator Expert Ford Mustang revealed here last month looks like it could be one of our very favourite sets that the company has ever produced. But for a whole lot less you could have your own ’60s Mustang Fastback that looks every bit as gorgeous as the 1,400-piece set. TLCB regular Simon Przepiorka is the builder behind this wonderful 8-wide ’69 Mustang ‘Boss’ Fastback and there’s more to see of his brilliant small-scale version of the iconic classic pony car on Flickr via the link above.

Lego Ford Mustang Boss

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Eleven Thousand Pieces of the Dark Side

Lego Star Wars Imperial Star Destroyer

From our (very) limited knowledge of the Star Wars movie franchise we’ve deduced that the good guys fly things named after letters whilst the bad guys fly things named after shapes. Kind of like an inter-galactic Sesame Street, although we’re not sure Bricknerd would see it that way.

The most powerfully evil of all the bad guys’ flying things are the spherical ones, but the triangles aren’t far behind. This is one such triangle; the ‘Monarch’ Imperial Star Destroyer.

Lego Star Wars Imperial Star Destroyer

Built by Flickr’s 0necase this incredible creation is constructed from around 11,000 LEGO bricks, and measures well over a meter in length. The huge engines are even formed by three LEGO Death Star pieces, amongst the largest in LEGO’s range, in a gloriously circuitous homage to the Empire.

There’s much more to see of this astonishing recreation of the second-most-evil of all the shapes in Star Wars at 0necase’s ‘Monarch ISD’ album – click here to join the Dark Side.

Lego Star Wars Imperial Star Destroyer

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Mech Monday

Lego Police Mech

We don’t often publicise mechs here at The Lego Car Blog. This is mostly because we’re a car blog, but also because we know absolutely nothing about them, and we’d look silly.

So here are two mechs…

We’re actually publishing these two builds because whilst they are both clearly superb creations, they demonstrate the very best in presentation too, with outstanding photography and editing – something that can be applied to any genre of building.

Image quality is the most common reason for creations suggested to us here at TLCB not to meet our criteria, with even the most brilliant of builds rejected if photography is poor. However clean backgrounds are super easy to achieve using natural light and 50p worth of coloured or white card, successfully removing shadows and other visual distortions. Just take a look at Marco Marozzi‘s ‘KZ1 ma.k mech below to see how successful this approach can be!

The other option is a cunningly photoshopped image. These are much harder to achieve but gosh do they look good if done right! Red Spacecat shows us how to do it properly with the stunning image above showing his KA-9 Police Support Unit in action dispelling civil unrest on the streets.

Both of today’s builders demonstrate the very best in presentation and there’s more to see of each build and the amazing images in which they’ve been captured via the links in the text above.

Lego Ma.K Mech

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Hackney Carriage

Lego Austin FX4 London Taxi

One of the most iconic vehicles in the world, London’s ‘Black Cab’ has remained visually unchanged for over sixty years. First built by Austin, which became British Leyland, and then by a succession of smaller specialist companies, the ‘Black Cab’ has ferried tens of millions of passengers around the streets of Britain’s capital.

This particular ‘Black Cab’ is an Austin FX4, a design first launched in 1958 that lasted right up until the late 1990s. Powered by various diesel engines the FX4, despite being a rather lovely vehicle, turned London’s air into a soot-filled soup, so thankfully they were banned from service in recent years (and their replacement is a far more air-quality friendly plug-in hybrid).

This brilliant Miniland-scale rendition of the old Austin FX4 comes from Peter Blackert aka Lego911 of Flickr and you can hail it for yourself via the link above. Just don’t breathe in what comes out the back…

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Into the Abyss

Lego Abyss Deep Sea Submarine

Deep sea submarines may be unusual fodder for Lego builders and this site alike, but they’re amazing machines. Designed to travel through an environment even more hostile than space, they’re at the very limit of what mankind can achieve. This small scale Lego version comes from Flickr’s Faber Mandragore, and whilst it might not be able to go to the bottom of the ocean it’ll look really cool in the bath. It’s apparently based upon the ‘Cab 1’ submarine from the movie ‘Abyss’, which… er, we haven’t seen, but no matter because we’ll enjoy it in the bath* nonetheless. Dive in via the link above.

*AKA ‘TLCB Executive Washroom and Sauna’

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Glorious Gulf

Lego Porsche 917K Gulf Racing

Is there a cooler racing livery than Gulf? Probably not, and thanks to the fact that LEGO’s colour palette is ever expanding (just like your Mom), it’s one that is now buildable from our favourite Danish bricks.

Previous bloggee Greg998 has done just that, with this gorgeous 1970 Gulf-Racing Porsche 917K, resplendent in the oil company’s famous blue and orange livery (with a few custom decals too), under which is a wonderfully detailed flat-12 engine.

The Gulf Racing Porsche 917Ks didn’t actually win Le Mans in 1970 (that honour went to the sister Porsche-Salzburg team), but we know which car looked the coolest…

See more of Greg’s brilliant Porsche 917K on Flickr via the link above.

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Hachi-Roku

Lego Toyota 86

The Toyota 86/GT86 / Scion FRS / Subaru BRZ is a rather wonderful machine. Light weight, low grip, rear-drive and very sidewaysy, it’s the antidote to this. And this. And this. And this. Which means most people aren’t interested in it and in the not too distant future cars like the 86 will probably be no more.

Simon Przepiorka is interested in the 86 though, and thus has built this most excellent Lego version, complete with opening doors, posable ‘steering’ and a plethora of cunning building techniques to create the svelte shape. There’s more to see at Simon’s 86 album on Flickr – click here to make the jump.

Lego Toyota 86

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Miami Vice

Lego Ferrari Daytona Miami Vice

Ferrari didn’t allow Miami Vice to use their cars, because they are – famously – dicks when it comes to their brand protection. The producers decided they wanted Ferraris anyway, and commissioned Corvette-based replicas to create their desired movie cars. We’re not sure who had the last laugh there, the Miami Vice production company or Ferrari, who received marketing for free without even having to lend out a couple of cars.

This neat replica of a replica of a Ferrari Daytona Spider in Miami Vice black on Magnolia spec comes from previous bloggee Jonathan Elliott, and a rather splendid job he’s done too. See more at the link above.

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Tilt!

Lego Ling-Temco-Vought (LTV) XC-142

From one weird aircraft to another today, only this one was real (sort of). Built in the 1960s, the Ling-Temco-Vought (LTV) XC-142 was an experimental tilt-rotor vertical take-off/landing aircraft, and it really did look as odd as it does here.

It worked too, with five prototypes performing successful test flights in the mid-1960s. However with four 2,850bhp engines the XC-142 probably wasn’t a particularly fuel efficient way to transport 4,000kgs of military stuff, and thus the project didn’t prove financially viable, being shelved in 1966.

Today just one prototype XC-142 survives, but Henrik Jensen has added another with his rather excellent recreation of the tilting oddity. There’s more to see at Henrik’s Flickr photostream and on MOCpages – click the links to tilt the table.

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Swordfish

Lego Sky-Fi Swordfish

Not the 2001 thriller in which Halle Berry was paid extra to get her norks out, but this; the AR-31 Swordfish seaplane, so called because it looks precisely nothing like a swordfish.

Built from deep within the mind of previous bloggee Jon Hall there’s much more to see (and an intriguing backstory to read) at the Swordfish’s Flickr album. Click the link above to make the jump.

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The Green Mile

Lego Concept Car

Looking like a cross between a hypermiling competition car and a coach, only with the addition of a few troll arms and mermaid tails, Vince_Toulouse‘s latest vehicular concept looks like a bugger to park. But then the coolest cars always are. See more of Vince’s ‘GR440 III’ at his photostream via the link above.

Lego Concept Car

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There Once Was an Ugly Duckling…

Lego Ugly Ducking Spaceship

…in space! This enormous long range research vessel was apparently named via a public vote, with ‘Ugly Ducking’ garnering the most support. Unlike a recent public naming poll, the Government decided to honour the outcome, and thus the Ugly Duckling was launched into space.

This amazing creation comes from Blake Foster, and the techniques used throughout it are anything but ugly. With superb photography and lighting it’s one of the most impressive sci-fi builds of the year so far, and there’s loads more to see at the Ugly Duckling’s Flickr album or via MOCpages.

Lego Ugly Ducking Spaceship

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Muscle Car Double

Lego Plymouth Hemi Cuda

Founded in the late 1920s, mis-managed into administration, and then closed down in the last decade or so, Plymouth and Pontiac are best known in recent times as victims of the Big Three’s sorry tale of arrogance, greed and incompetence.

But before all that there were some good times. Really good times. In the late-’60s to early-’70s the muscle car was in a golden age, and both Plymouth and Pontiac were riding the crest of that wave.

Plymouth’s Barracuda (above) launched in the mid-’60s with a range of engines beginning at just 100bhp, yet by 1970 it was making up to 425bhp from an enormous Hemi V8. Unfortunately 425bhp didn’t sit really suit the market once the oil crisis hit in 1973, and production ended shortly afterwards, but if anything that short life has helped the ‘Cuda become one of most sought-after muscle cars in history.

General Motors were also in on the muscle car action in the 1960s, bringing – via their Pontiac brand – the GTO (below) to market in ’64. By the 1970s they too were making over 400bhp, with stock cars delivering 13.4 second 1/4 miles times straight from the forecourt. Like Plymouth the oil crisis put an end to that, but in its hay-day the Pontiac GTO sold almost 100,000 units annually, despite its slow steering and ‘amazingly inadequate’ brakes. The roads must have been a fun (if slightly terrifying) place!

Lego Pontiac GTO

The two superb Speed Champions versions of the Plymouth Hemi ‘Cuda and Pontiac GTO pictured here are the work of Thomas Gion, who has faithfully recreated both cars in just 6-studs of width, capturing the styling cues of each brilliantly.

Today both brands are gone, but the legendary cars they created in the 1960s and ’70s mean they won’t be forgotten for some time yet.

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Brutal Birdie

Lego Fabuland Motorcycle

Here’s a Fabuland bird riding a rocket launcher-equipped motorcycle. Because, well.. it’s a Fabuland bird riding a rocket launcher-equipped motorcycle, and no further reasons are required.

It’s the work of Flickr’s Andreas Lenander, and if you’re wondering what the hell ‘Fabuland‘ is, click here.

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