Tag Archives: Sports Car

VTEC Just Kicked In Yo

The car of nine thousand memes. And nine thousand revs. Which is a lot.

The Honda S2000 was quite a special thing when it debuted in 1999, taking Honda’s VTEC system to the max, and fitted with a naturally-aspirated engine delivering a higher specific output per litre than anything that had gone before. Supercars included.

It also had rather spiky handling and a gauge cluster from a 1980s microwave, but none of that mattered when you reached peak power output at 8,800rpm.

This one was discovered by one of our Elves on Flickr, and comes from Mihail Rakovskiy who has captured it near perfectly in brick form.

Take it to the 9,000rpm red line via the link above.

Build This Car

There are many great things about working for The Lego Car Blog; The rock-star level of fame. The immense riches. The queue of attractive girls waiting to enter TLCB Towers for a piece of the action.

However it’s not all paparazzi, wealth, and wild parties. Offsetting this are – as with everything in life – a few negatives; The Elves (obviously). The constant Cialis spam. The daily removal of (sometimes wildly) inappropriate images added to the Blogged by TLCB Flickr group. And lastly, the ‘Where can I buy this? / How do I build this? / Building instructions please’ comments, when every single post has a link to the builder’s page.

So today we’re addressing the latter of these, by – as you can see here – publishing the complete photo-based building instructions for Andrea Lattanzio (aka Norton74)‘s excellent Speed Champions scale ‘Classic Sports Car’.

Suggested by a reader and built from 160 fairly common pieces, Andrea’s classic Camaro-esque convertible can be constructed in just eighteen steps, each of which has been photographed superbly alongside a complete parts listing.

Andrea’s instructional album can be found on Flickr via the link in the text above, plus you can read his Master MOCers interview here at TLCB to learn more about how he designs creations such as this one.

Click the links to take a look, whilst this TLCB Writer responds to one of the countless Cialis messages in readiness for this evening’s wild party…

Small Brits

Over one in three Americans are obese, but TLCB’s home nation isn’t far behind, with 28% of the population being medically categorised as ‘chunkadunk’. Today though, we have two really small Brits, each being constructed in diminutive Speed Champions scale, yet still instantly recognisable as miniatures of their real-world brethren.

The first (above) is a tiny car in real life too, being a delightful recreation of the late-’50s Austin-Healey ‘Frogeye’ Sprite by RGB900. The real Spite measured just 3.5 metres in length, making it almost a third shorter than McLaren’s ridiculously-long 5.1 metre Speedtail.

Suggested by a reader, this neat Speed Champions version of one of McLaren’s million special editions is the work of newcomer User 5346 and there’s more of each small-scale Brit to see on Flickr. Take a look via the links above whilst we go and eat a donut or six.

The Answer’s Always ‘Miata’

Ask the internet any sports car question and the answer is always ‘Miata’. Except when it’s ‘Put an LS in it’. Although sometimes the answer is both.

Today’s answer is Miata too, courtesy of David Elisson‘s neatly recreated version of the iconic Japanese sports car in its fourth (ND) generation.

There’s space for two mini-figures, the doors and hood open (the latter revealing a well detailed engine underneath), and – rather impressively – the convertible roof works too.

Click the link above for the obvious answer.

My Fair Lady

This beautifully presented Datsun 240Z ‘Fairlady’ could be yours! Well, not this one; it’s owned by builder SP_LINEUP, but he’s also released his superb restomod classic Datsun as a kit available to buy. The model includes opening doors that reveal a wonderfully detailed interior, and an opening hood under which lives an accurately replicated RB26DET engine. See more of SP’s stunning Datsun 240Z at his photostream – click the link above to make the jump.

My Other Car Transporter is a Car Transporter

LEGO’s 42098 Technic Car Transporter is an interesting looking set. It comes with instructions for a B-Model too, but that hasn’t stopped TLCB Debutant Matthew Terentev from building his own creation solely from the parts found within the set.

Matthew’s C-Model takes the car transporter and sports car from 42098 and turns them into…. well, a car transporter and a sports car. But they really are most excellent.

Both models feature working steering and miniature working piston engines, whilst the truck also includes a sliding ramp to allow the car to load/unload.

See more of Matthew’s build on Flickr via the link above, where you can also find a link to instructions should you own a 42098 set and wish to build Matthew’s alternates for yourself.

Cockster

We don’t particularly like the Porsche Boxter here at The Lego Car Blog, as they tend to be driven by… well, the title is a clue. Still, it’s a superb drivers car even if the drivers are knobs and one that deserves recognition, which TLCB regular SP_LINEUP (previously known as Simon Przepiorka) has given in Lego form through his excellent 1:24 version. The model includes opening doors, hood, trunk, plus a removable roof, and you can see more at the link.

The Answer’s Always Miata

Whatever the question, the answer is always Miata. Or MX-5 if you’re not American. Or Eunos if you’re in Japan. But you get the point. Light, reliable, fast enough, and able to go sideways, the Miata/MX-5/Eunos is very probably the greatest sports care ever made. This is SP_LINEUP‘s Speed Champions scale recreation of the second generation of Mazda’s iconic two seater roadster, and it captures the look of the real car beautifully, with opening doors, hood and a removable roof too. SP has made instructions for his design available should you wish to build your own and you can find these and further images at his photostream via the link above.

Heyday

TVR and MOCpages have much in common. Unreliable yet much loved, they both enjoyed a glorious peak and then slipped into obscurity.

But there is hope.

TVR has a new owner and a new car on the way designed by McLaren F1 legend Gordon Murray, whilst MOCpages can, if the moon is in the right place and the servers are working, still reveal an absolute gem. This is one, created by a builder prolific during the site’s heyday, and it’s a car from TVR’s glorious mid-90’s heyday too.

Nick Barrett built this lovely TVR Griffith as a commission for an owner of the real thing, and he’s captured the British sports car superbly. You can head to MOCpages (if the site is working*) for all the photos, plus you can read Nick’s interview here at TLCB as he now builds Lego models for a job. And it all started on MOCpages.

*Or here if it’s not. Just like a TVR owner, it’s best to have a back-up.

Caddy Powered Classic

We like usual cars here at The Lego Car Blog, and they don’t come much more unusual than this.

‘This’ is a 1954 HWM Cadillac, built for amateur racer Tony Page and raced across England in the mid 1950s. Page took the Cadillac engine from his previous racing car, an Allard J2, and fitted it to a chassis and body from Hersham & Walton Motors of London, who built competitive Jaguar-engined sports and Formula 2 cars in the early ’50s.

After racing successfully for a few years Page sold the car, whereupon it raced in New Zealand until 1970 when it disappeared into storage. The car surfaced again in 2012 when it was acquired by a new owner and fully restored.

This gorgeous recreation of the HWM Cadillac comes from Tim Inman of Flickr who has done a stellar job of recreating the one-off classic, complete with a detailed replica of the Cadillac engine that powered the car. There’s more to see of Tim’s excellent build at his photostream – click the link above to make the jump to the full gallery.

Bolt from the Blue

Those of you with good memories will known that Simon Przepiorka‘s excellent slighlty-larger-than-Speed-Champions-scale Honda S2000 has appeared at The Lego Car Blog before. Back in March Simon’s model featured here sporting an Amuse bodykit, about which we wrote “Whether you like that addition or not will be a matter of taste (TLCB Elves and TLCB staff differ somewhat here…)”.

Simon has now updated his AP1 S2000 for those of us who aren’t TLCB Elves (or aged seven), by removing the aforementioned bodykit, lightly modifying the fenders, and fitting a great looking black hardtop.

As before Simon’s Honda includes opening doors and an opening hood, under which sits an easily removable F20C engine, famous for its bolt-activated high-lift cam system and 9000rpm redline. He’s also made instructions available should you wish to build your own version of his design and you can find the link to them, plus see all of the superb imagery, at Simon’s Flickr photostream. Click the link above to take a closer look.

Honda S2000 | Picture Special

Honda’s S2000, built from 1999 to 2009 during the company’s peak, was a gloriously unhinged machine. Its 2-litre engine made an astonishing 240bhp without turbocharging, and it took Ferrari to finally beat the S2000’s highest-output-per-litre record for a naturally aspirated engine with the 458 Italia, a full decade after the S2000’s launch.

Honda achieved this engineering witchcraft through the most Japanese of approaches; revs. The S2000’s F20C engine could rev to 9000rpm, with VTEC only engaging well above 6000rpm. It engaged with a bit go a bang too, and as the S2000’s handling wasn’t quite up to Porsche levels it meant that more than a few cars ended up travelling backwards through hedges.

This wonderful Technic recreation of Honda’s legendary sports car comes from previous bloggee and TLCB Master MOCer Nico71, who has done an incredible job replicating the AP2 series S2000 inside and out.

Not only does Nico’s model look the part (helped by 3D-printed wheels and a few well chosen custom stickers), it’s packed with technical detail too, including working steering, accurate double-wishbone suspension, a replica F20C 4-cylinder engine driven by the rear wheels, opening doors, hood and trunk, and a working convertible roof.

There’s lots more of Nico’s superb Technic Honda S2000 AP2 to see on Brickshelf or at his website by clicking here, including the complete image gallery, full build details and yes – instructions! Click the link above to feel VTEC kick-in yo!

Backbone

Interchangeable bodywork is something that every LEGO vehicle is capable of, by virtue of them being, well… LEGO. However it’s particularly cool if you can swap the whole bodywork out in one piece. Even LEGO themselves tried this back in 1996 with their 8244 Technic set, although the results were a bit weird.

Not so Angka Utama’s attempt, which is properly cool. Entitled ‘Backbone’, Angka has designed three different bodies that can be mounted on his chassis design, and with reversible seats and a moveable engine it can switch between being front, rear or mid-engined in seconds. Take a look on either Flickr or MOCpages to see how it’s done!

Green ‘Gator

Lego Porsche Cayman R

OK, a cayman isn’t quite an alligator, but they are both green. Or something. Anyway, here’s a most excellent Porsche Cayman R in a retena-searing lime green, and it looks the business. Built by TLCB regular Simon Przepiorka (who is due here tomorrow too with something very cool) it’s a superb recreation of Porsche’s fastest mid-engined coupe, which is no easy feat given the shape of the real car. Cunning techniques abound and there’s more to see on Flickr via the link above.

Amusing S2000

Lego Honda S2000 Amuse

Honda’s late-’90s to late-’00s S2000 was a riotously amusing car. With a 9000rpm redline and the most powerful naturally-aspirated engine by capacity in the world, it even spawned its own meme.

This excellent small-scale recreation of the Honda S2000 comes from serial bloggee Simon Przepiorka, who has fitted his version with a full Amuse bodykit. Whether you like that addition or not will be a matter of taste (TLCB Elves and TLCB staff differ somewhat here…) but either way it’s a brilliant build. See more on Flickr at the link above.