Tag Archives: Italy

I 4C a Failure

The Alfa Romeo 4C is not a good car. But it is gorgeous, so we still want one, if only to look at it. It’s also one of Alfa Romeo’s many recent failures, partly because the car wasn’t very good, and partly because these days buyers only seem to want an angry German saloon car with a twin-turbo V8, six million horsepower, and no driving feel or real-world relevance whatsoever.

Which is a mighty shame, because it means lightweight, small sports cars like the admittedly mediocre 4C and the thoroughly brilliant Alpine A110 are bombing commercially, and soon all we’ll have is angry German saloons.

This fantastic Model Team Alfa Romeo 4C comes from previous bloggee Noah_L, who has created one the most beautiful (and difficult to replicate) modern automotive shapes to near perfection from fairly basic LEGO parts. In fact the two flex tubes that form the bonnet and grille may be the neatest solution to the 4C’s shape that we have seen yet, and a technique we think we’ll start to see on all sorts of Lego cars in the future.

Noah’s model also includes a detailed interior behind the opening doors and an accurate recreation of the mid-mounted 1750cc turbocharged 4-cylinder engine under the rear hatch, and there are loads more stunning images to view at his Alfa Romeo 4C album on Flickr. Click the link above to take a look, which – to be honest – is all the actual 4C is really for anyway.

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Lancia-Italia Fulvia HF Rally Car | Picture Special

It’s not often that TLCB Team are stunned by a model brought back by one of our smelly little workers. We are of course experienced professionals, experts in Lego creations, and with a wealth of building talent ourselves. Oh, sorry – that’s the Brothers Brick – we’re still as incompetent as ever, but nevertheless it takes a lot to genuinely excite us, so blasé have we become through years of blogging. Today however, we are all spectacularly impressed, thanks to All.About.Lego and his amazing Technic Lancia Fulvia HF rally car.

Built for the current Eurobricks small car contest, this incredible recreation of one of rallying’s all-time-greats not only looks absolutely wonderful (and superbly accurate, despite being the difficulty of being a Technic build), it features more working functionality than models five times its size. So much in fact, that this tiny Lancia really is a Technic ‘Supercar’.

A working V4 engine is driven by the front-wheels (yup, the fronts, as per the real Fulvia and we have no idea how All.About.Lego has managed it), whilst a rear-mounted gearbox (technically a two-speed transaxle) can be controlled via the cabin gearstick.

Working leaf-spring suspension and functioning steering feature too, completing the Technic ‘Supercar’ necessities, plus the model features opening doors, hood and trunk, as well as an accurate period livery complete with superbly replicated decals.

It’s a phenomenal build and one that will start a riot here in TLCB office if it doesn’t win the Eurobricks Small Car Contest. Head to Flickr or the Eurobricks forum to see more of All.About.Lego’s spellbinding creation and LEGO, make this a set please! We’ll buy eight.

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Small Supercar

This brilliant little Technic Ferrari F40 was discovered by one of our Elves today, and it continues the run of excellent small-scale supercars being generated by the Eurobricks Small Car contest. Built by previous bloggee paave it features a wealth of functionality that you’d normally expect to find in a model much larger, including a working V8 engine, steering, pop-up headlights, and opening doors, front truck and clamshell engine cover. There’s more to see at the Eurobricks forum and you can make the jump there via the link above.

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Fabulous Forty

This post’s title can be found on any number of slightly tragic birthday cards for those hitting their forth decade, but who are still drinking like they’re twenty-three. Ferrari’s 40th birthday was far classier. A present to themselves, they created this; the carbon fibre, twin turbo-charged F40, and in doing so produced one of the greatest supercars of all time.

This incredible replica of Ferrari’s fortieth birthday present is the work of ZetoVince of Flickr, who has recreated the iconic late ’80s supercar in stunning detail. Taking the wheels, but little else, from the official Creator 10248 Ferrari F40 set, Zeto has upped the realism considerably, with a huge array of ingenious building techniques used to accurately recreate the real car.

Further images of ZetoVince’s beautiful Ferrari F40 are available to view at his Flickr photostream – click the link above to make the jump and join the party.

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Not Everything in the ’70s was Brown

Cars in the 1970s tended to look like this. Or this. Or this. Or this. And then the Lamborghini Countach came along, from space.

Launched in 1974 the world hadn’t seen anything like it, and the car instantly became a cult bedroom wall icon. It’s fortunate however, that most people know the Countach from a poster rather than from driving one, because they would probably be rather disappointed.

Why not stick to this then, Jerac‘s incredible Model Team replica of the 1970s icon. Jerac has captured the Countach’s wild shape to perfection and he’s even made instructions available so you can build your very own. Which means you can own a Countach for the looks without having to drive one, which really is what the car is all about.

Head to Jerac’s photostream via the link above to find of all his superb images plus a link to building instructions too.

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ZondaRRRR

The Pagani that sounds like it was named by pirates, the Zonda R was the Zonda’s finale; a track-only, fifteen-run special edition that was effectively a test-bed for what would become the Hyaura. You’re unlikely ever to even see an R, let alone drive one, so 3D supercarBricks has the next best thing in thus stunning brick-built replica. Now updated with a blog-worthy image there’s more to see at 3D’s ‘Pagani’ album on Flickr – take a look via the link above.

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Creator Expert 10271 Fiat 500 | Set Preview

An Italian LEGO set that isn’t a supercar! LEGO’s successful line of officially licensed sets has been a properly exciting shift in the brand’s strategy, bringing real-world cars to bedroom floors everywhere. Beginning with Ferrari, a host of brands have joined the line-up, with fellow Italian supercar manufacturer Lamborghini one of the most recent new additions.

However despite Ferrari being the first car maker to partner with LEGO, their parent company Fiat have been oddly absent. Perhaps Fiat’s current range of distinctly mediocre offerings doesn’t lend itself too well to models that people would want to buy. Fiat 500L anyone?

However Fiat’s back-catalogue is far more interesting, with the original 500 being one of the most loved and well known classic cars of all time. A perfect candidate to be recreated as a Creator Expert set then, joining contemporaries such as the Mini Cooper and Volkswagen Beetle.

LEGO’s new 10271 Fiat 500 set brings the iconic Italian city car to life in brick, with 960 of them forming the 500’s famous silhouette, many of which appear in this gorgeous primrose yellow hue for the first time.

Bespoke period-correct Fiat decals, opening doors hood and engine cover, a detailed interior, and a boot-mounted travel case all feature, as does – weirdly – an easel with a Fiat 500 painting placed upon it. Now if only the painting had an easel in the background of its Fiat 500, which of course would depict a Fiat 500 with an easel in the background… A thought that like that can break your brain.

Despite the moderate piece count the new 10271 Fiat 500 set will be one of the smaller models in the Creator Expert range, measuring 24cm long and 11cm wide – suitably befitting of the original car’s tiny dimensions – and will cost around $90/£75 when it goes on sale in March of 2020. In a line-up that was perhaps becoming a bit supercar-heavy, we think the addition of something small, slow, and classic is a fantastic choice. Top marks LEGO!

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Light Artillery

Lego SPA TL17

This is an SPA TL.37, a light artillery tractor built by a subsidiary of Fiat during the Second World War for Royal Italian Army. Powered by a huge 4-litre 4-cylinder engine, with four wheel drive and four wheel steering, able to climb a 40-degree slope, and capable of 40km/h whilst pulling 75 or 100mm artillery pieces, it looks like a seriously fun vehicle for gadding about in the desert. Unfortunately for the Axis Powers their gadding about in the desert did not go well, but that’s not exactly the fault of SPA TL.37. There’s more to see of this one courtesy of Rebla of Flickr – click here to take a look.

Lego SPA TL.37

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Semovente Self-Propelled Gun

Lego Semovente da 75/18 Self-Propelled Gun

We’ve written about Italy’s disastrous North African campaign during the Second Wold War before, so we’re skipping the history today to get straight to the MOC, a Semovente da 75/18 self-propelled gun (tank?), as built by Rebla of Flickr. Rebla’s mini-figure scale model recreates the Semovente beautifully, and even includes (sort of) working suspension on its tracks. There’s more to see of Rebla’s wonderful World War 2 tank (including a rather debonaire-looking driver) on Flickr – click on the link above to self-propel your way there.

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To Battle!

Lego Carro Armato M14/41

No, the other way…

This is a Carro Armato M14/41 tank, as manufactured by Fiat for the Royal Italian Army. That means we’re not sure which side this magnificently moustachioed mini-figure is on as Italy switched during World War 2. However as this tank is painted in the colours of the North Africa Campaign it suggests he’s fighting for Mussolini, a man known to have been ‘a bit of a dick’.

Luckily for TLCB’s home nation and the other Allies that this tank fought against, the M14/41 was absolutely rubbish, being obsolete when new, unreliable, cramped, and catching fire regularly. Which is most unlike a Fiat.

Fortunately these short-comings led to a less than successful military campaign, and likely hastened Italy’s overthrowing of Mussolini, abandonment of fascism, and switch to the Allied cause.

This brilliant mini-figure scale recreation of the Carro Armato M14/41 comes from Albert of Flickr, making his TLCB debut. Ingenious building techniques abound and there’s more to see at Albert’s photostream – click the link above to make the jump.

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Italian-American

Lego Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 Motorcycle

Italian-Americans often seem to be more Italian than actual, you know, Italians. Maybe that’s why Moto Guzzi, Europe’s oldest motorcycle manufacturer in continuous production, have named as many of their bikes after American places as Italian ones.

This is one such bike, the Daytona 1000, as built by previous bloggee Angka Utama. Powered by a V-Twin producing around 100bhp the Daytona was a quick bike in its day, and was produced during the ’90s when the brand was under DeTomaso’s ownership.

There’s more to see of Angka’s excellent Model Team recreation of the Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 at both Flickr and MOCpages – click the links to go for a ride.

Lego Moto Guzzi Daytona 1000 Motorcycle

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Little Lion Man

Lego OM Leoncino Truck

Andrea Lattanzio aka Norton74‘s beautiful OM Leoncino (which translates literally as ‘little lion’) tanker truck featured here last month as part of his stunning AGIP gas station diorama, and Andrea has now uploaded more detailed images of the model from his larger build.

Lego OM Leoncino Truck

At only 8-studs wide Andrea’s OM Leoncino tanker packs in some astonishingly accurate detailing, helped no doubt by the wonderful ‘AGIP’ and ‘Supercortemaggiore’ decals applied to enhance the realism. There’s more to see of Andrea’s little lion on Flickr via the link above, you can read our interview with him as part of the Master MOCers series by clicking here, and today’s excellent title song can be found here.

Lego OM Leoncino AGIP Tanker

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Anni d’oro

Lego Lancia Fulvia Rallye

If you had to place a bet in the 1960s on which car manufacturer, BMW or Lancia, would be a multi-million unit selling colossus in 2018, it wouldn’t have been on the firm from Bavaria.

Lancia weren’t just a manufacturer of exceptional drivers saloon cars in the golden years, they were a pioneer. The first company to use monocoque construction, independent suspension, and even complete electrics, Lancia are one of the automotive innovators of the 30’s-’80s. BMW meanwhile, were making this

Sadly though, under FIAT’s ownership today they’re not even a shadow of a shadow of their former self. Fortunately Senator Chinchilla of Flickr is here to remind us of what Lancia used to be, thanks to his glorious ’60s Fulvia Rallye with opening doors, hood and trunk, and a detailed recreation of Lancia’s ingenious narrow-angle double overhead cam V4 engine.

There’s a whole lot more of the Senator’s brilliant Lancia Fulvia to see at his photostream – click the link above to make the jump to Lancia’s golden years.

Lego Lancia Fulvia Rallye

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Benzina Supercortemaggiore

Lego AGIP Gas Station

Things always sound cooler in Italian. This glorious 1960s gas station comes from Master MOCer Andrea Lattanzio aka Norton74. It’s a mini-figure scale replica of one of AGIP’s modernist gas stations that were built across Italy, with curved glass walls, sloping roofs, and a six-legged dog on a stick in the forecourt. Andrea has recreated the structure beautifully, including all the paraphernalia to be found in at Italian gas station in the ’60s, plus a superb period-correct OM Leoncino tanker. There’s a whole lot more of the build to see at Andrea’s Flickr album by clicking this link, plus you can read his interview here at TLCB as part of the Master MOCer series via the link in the text above.

Lego AGIP Gas Station

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Fine Vintage

Lego Mercer 5 Sporting 1920

LEGO’s Speed Champions sets have brought some of the most exciting new and classic real-world cars to Lego fans in brick form. From modern McLarens to classic Mustangs, the range covers about 60 years of motoring greats. But what if it went back into the annuls of automotive history just a little further…

These three gorgeous Speed Champions style vintage cars come from Flickr’s Łukasz Libuszewski, who has done a wonderful job recreating their largely-forgeotten shapes in our favourite Danish plastic.

Lego 1928 Cadillac

The first (top, in red) is a 1920 Mercer 5 Sporting, built by the American motor car company that manufactured high performance cars from 1909 until the Great Depression put them out of business in 1925 some 5,000 units later.

The second (above, in green) is also a vintage American, but from a company that survived the depression era and is still making cars today. Founded in 1902 Cadillac are one of the oldest car companies in the world and have been owned by General Motors since 1909. The model pictured above dates from 1928 and Łukasz has used some ingenious building techniques to recreate the cycle-wings and carriage-type body typical of the time.

Lego Lancia Lambda 1922

The final of Łukasz’s three vintage builds (above, in brown) comes from the other side of the Atlantic and Italy, where Lancia have been producing cars since 1906. Lancia are now sadly a shadow of their previous greatness and today produce just one car (an ugly Fiat knock-off), making us fear that they’ll be gone altogether before long.

This 1922 Lambda was the polar opposite of their hateful modern offering, a revolutionary design that pioneered independent suspension, the world’s first unitary body, and that produced almost 70bhp from its four-cylinder engine.

The Lambda has been recreated beautifully by Łukasz in the model pictured above and there’s more to see of it the other excellent vintage Speed Champions cars shown here by visiting his photostream – click here to see some of the finest cars of 1920s.

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