Tag Archives: steam train

Not a Car

Lego NSW AD60 Steam Locomotive

But one heck of a beautiful steam train. And who doesn’t like steam trains? This particular locomotive is a New South Wales AD60 Class, of which 42 were built in the 1950s. Coming right at the end of the steam’s reign on the railways the AD60 Class were the most powerful locomotives ever used in Australia and this 97 stud long replica packs a punch too, being powered by twin Power Functions XL motors. Alexander of Flickr is the builder behind this stunning recreation of the AD60 and there’s lots more to see, including some ingenious ‘how to’ photos detailing the hidden building techniques, via the link above.

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Blue Comet

Lego Blue Comet Steam Train

Operating from the late 1920s until the early 1940s in New Jersey, the Blue Comet pulled carriages between New York and Atlantic City, taking just three hours to complete the journey (including a ferry crossing to Manhattan Island), and able to reach speeds of over 100mph. This magnificent recreation of one of America’s most beautiful locomotives comes from Flickr’s Cale Leiphart who has faithfully recreated not just the locomotive, but the tender and carriages too. An extensive gallery of superb images is available to view at Cale’s photostream – click the link above to buy your ticket.

Lego Blue Comet Locomotive

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Once Upon a Time in the West

Lego Western Train Robbery

Yes it’s no use saying that you don’t know nothing
It’s still gonna get you if you don’t do something
Sitting on a fence that’s a dangerous course
Oh, you could even catch a bullet from the peace-keeping force
Even the hero gets a bullet in the chest
Oh yeah, once upon a time in the west

Our obscure British music theme continues here at The Lego Car Blog. If that’s not your thing (and if it isn’t, take a long look at yourself), perhaps try this alternative. Oh, the model! This superb Western train robbery scene comes from Flickr’s markus19840420 (there must be a lot of Markuses on Flickr) and there’s more to see by clicking here.

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Not a Car

Lego Steam Train

The Lego Car Blog Elves didn’t find any cars for us to blog today, but they did find this; a lovely Town-scale replica of a German BR23 Epoch II steam locomotive. It’s been built by omega3108, it’s driven by Power Functions, and there’s more to see via the link above.

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Not a Car…

Lego German Baureihe 41-241 Polarstern

It is in fact a Baureihe 41-241 Polarstern steam locomotive operated by Deutsche Reichsbahn, and, if we’re being honest, we only know that from the builder’s description. But we are a car blog so European railways of the 1930s are a bit outside of our (admittedly limited) skill set.

This stunning model is the work of previous bloggee, TLCB favourite, and Master MOCer BricksonWheels, and it’s a beautifully thought-out build. With exquisite custom 3D printed wheels and valve train (see the image below), plus two Power Functions XL motors and in-built IR receivers driving it, the Polarstern locomotive demonstrates an incredible attention to detail.

Lego 3D Printed Steam Train Parts

You can read further details of both the build and the real train, and see the full gallery of stunning imagery, at BricksonWheels’ photostream – click here to buy a ticket.

Lego Steam Locomotive BricksonWheels

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Hey Big Boy!*

Lego Union Pacific Big Boy Locomotive

This magnificent creation is the work of previous bloggee and TLCB Master MOCer Dennis Glaasker aka Bricksonwheels, and it’s something rather special. It’s a Union Pacific ‘Big Boy’ locomotive, and unlike most of Dennis’ builds it’s a relatively small 1:38 scale. But that doesn’t mean it’s a small build; at over a metre long it takes three Power Functions XL motors mounted in the tender to drive it, which is probably the most power any mini-figure has ever had.

Building such a huge locomotive presented Dennis with several building challenges. LEGO don’t make train wheels large enough, so Dennis worked with a friend to design and manufacture unique 3D printed wheels – complete with LEGO-compatible valve gear. A Tamiya RC battery provides the power, connected via an SBrick control module to ensure the battery power remains derestricted, and the train’s lighting is taken care of via a neat Brickstuff LED kit.

Lego Big Boy Steam Train Bricksonwheels

Whilst some way from a completely Lego build, Dennis’ creation shows how exceptional a model can be when LEGO bricks are used alongside specialist components.

If you’re interest in learning more about the Union Pacific build and the components used to create it you can visit the model at Dennis’ Flickr photostream here, where there are also links to the third-party suppliers and where you can see the other amazing creations that Dennis has built.

Lego Union Pacific Big Boy Train Remote Control

*In the voice of your Mom

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The Flying Scotsman

Lego The Flying Scotsman

Hitting over 100mph in 1934, the Flying Scotsman steam locomotive is one of the world’s greatest trains. This outstanding Lego replica is the work of Certified LEGO Professional Ryan McNaught (aka TheBrickMan), and it’s built from over 165,000 LEGO bricks, measuring over 10ft in length. There’s more to see at Ryan’s Flickr photostream – click the link above to climb on board.

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Train Wreck

Lego Steam Train Crash

The Lego Car Blog Elves don’t usually like trains. But they do like crashes. They like crashes a lot. So you can imagine their delight when this incredible scene from W Navarre was found.* Sadly the Elves haven’t figured out that this is a photograph, and not a movie, so the much anticipated crash will never come, but they will eventually.

You can check out the full scene on MOCpages, where there are some simply stunning details. Click the link above to climb on board!

*By ‘found’, we really mean ‘stolen’. Thanks Bricknerd!

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All Aboard

Lego Train

We don’t post trains here at TLCB unless they’re particularly lovely. This one by Flickr’s msbbanl is particularly lovely, and you can get a ticket at the link above.

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A Little Steamy

Lego Micro Steam Train

This tiny steam train was found on…er, The Brothers Brick, but whatever, it’s really good and it’s allowed us to make the most British of references about our encounter with your Mom last night. Flickr’s Galaktek is the builder and you can see more via the link above.

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They’ve Saved the Best Trip For Last…

Lego Back to the Future Part IIIBut this time they may have gone too far.

In 1990’s final* instalment of the superb Back to the Future franchise the ageing DeLorean needed a little help in hitting 88mph. Flickr’s Irwan Prabowo – making his TLCB debut – has recreated the famous Back to the Future Part III movie ending sequence wonderfully in micro-scale. You can see more of Irwan’s mini DeLorean time machine and the 1885 steam locomotive pushing it at his photostream via the link above.

*Maybe…

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Not a Car. Er, again.

Lego Steam Train

This is not a car. But it is lovely. Dan42BR‘s Dampflok 109-13 steam locomotive was discovered on Brickshelf, and you can view all the photos via the link.

We promise the next post will definitely, positively be a car. Probably.

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All Aboard

Lego Steam Locomotive

We’re back! We hope you all had a great Christmas, and for our readers around the world where Christmas isn’t a thing, a great Wednesday.

The Elves, caged for the past few days and eager* to get back to hunting out the best Lego creations on the web, were re-released today. They should start reappearing at The Lego Car Blog Towers with their finds soon, but in the meantime here is one of your suggestions, a rather lovely steam locomotive by T.Munz on Flickr. Check it out at the link.

*Hungry

 

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Teeny Tiny Train

Lego Train

Insert micro-figs for twice the awesome

The Lego Car Blog Elves are no stranger to small things. Firstly, we’re pretty sure their brains are about the size of a squash ball, and secondly, we can fit a lot of them into one packing box if we have to. But enough about our slovenly workforce, the MOC: It’s possibly the smallest thing we’ve ever featured, and yet we’re enthralled by the detail contained within it. Henning Birkeland is the owner. See more on MOCpages.

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