Tag Archives: train

Not a Car

But a pair of Abt locomotives that are, well… beautiful. We thought Abt were a motorsport company specialising in Volkswagen Group products, but then we are a car blog after all. Sharing a name but otherwise totally unrelated are these Abt locos built for the Mount Lyell Mining Company’s narrow gauge railway on the Tasmanian West Coast. And they really are built for Tasmania’s West Coast, as builder Alexander (aka narrow_gauge) was commissioned to create these for The West Coast Wilderness Railway who now run the real restored locomotives. Custom decals, 3D printed valve gear and motors complete the realism, and there’s more to see at Alexander’s photostream via the link above (or at the The West Coast Wilderness Railway Museum).

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Not a Car

This is definitely, positively, not a car. In fact we don’t really know what it is (OK, a train, but beyond that…), but what we do know is it’s one of the best examples of LEGO presentation we’ve yet found. Brilliantly superimposed on a real-world background, Sergio Batista‘s rendered train includes a little dirt and grime, plus a lovely reflection effect where the light hits the top of the train carriages. There’s more to see of this image plus the others in Sergio’s collection on Flickr.

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BuWizz Train Pull!

Yes you read that right. The guys over at BuWizz, who have designed a rather clever fully LEGO-compatible bluetooth control/battery, have decided to showcase the power of their little brick by a pulling train! With standard LEGO motors (and only three of them!). Don’t believe us? Take a look via the video above!

If you’d like to see how you can use the power of BuWizz yourself (even if you don’t have an old-timey train carriage handy) you can read our review of the BuWizz device by clicking here.

BuWizz

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Not a Car

Lego Prussian T3 Steam Locomotive

TLCB Elves haven’t brought much back over the past few days, but fear not readers, we have some cracking cars for you tomorrow! Until then, here is something that is definitely not a car, but it is rather lovely. This usually-scaled steam engine is a Prussian T3, as built by previous bloggee Nikolaus Lowe of Flickr in 12-wide Lego form. There’s more to see of this neat German steam locomotive at the link above, and we’ll see you tomorrow with some particularly awesome cars…

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Moon City

Lego Steampunk City

We do not understand steampunk. Effectively what sci-fi would look like if it were devised in the late 1800s, it’s a genre so alien to TLCB staff it may as well be the plot of ‘Keeping Up with the Kardashians’. The creations that steampunk produces however, are not like the Kardashians at all. They’re wonderful.

Lego Steampunk City

This is one such build, the Moon City originating from the mind of Dwarlin Forkbeard, which is filled with such gorgeous detail that we want to move straight there and get a job mining cheese. Complete with a marvellous motorised train (although the journey does look a bit samey), working elevators, and a rotating orrery, Dwalin’s city is packed with ingenious movement too. Click on these words to head to the moon sometime in the 1880s…

Lego Steampunk City

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M-Tronorail

Lego M-Tron Monorail

Those no-good space pirates Blacktron are at it again. The harmless magnet-collectors of M-Tron have built themselves a monorail, full of some delicious space fuel as yet undiscovered by science. Yet no sooner have they loaded up than those sneaky Blacktron reprobates begin a cunning space siphon of the liquid goodness. Maybe it’s beer? Whatever it is you can see more of the heist courtesy of Kalais of Flickr – click the link to take a look!

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Big Train*

Lego CP 1408 Locomotive

Just like your Mom, today’s model is much, much larger than you think it’s going to be. Riding on brick-built wheels (each made from nineteen pieces), Andre Pinto‘s CP 1409 locomotive is a seven thousand piece Goliath, with another seven thousand pieces in the brick-built tracks and base.

These engines were constructed in England in the 1960s for use in Portugal, where 67 of them pulled pretty much anything across the country. Andre’s creation replicates the original locomotives beautifully and there’s more to see at his Flickr album via the link above, plus you can join the discussion at the Eurobricks forum here.

Lego CP 1408 Locomotive

*The surreal British comedy from which today’s title is taken. Good if you want to see what Simon Pegg did before he was a famous movie star, not so good if you want to laugh…

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Iron Road

Lego Microscale Train Bridge

We’re a bit nerdy here at The Lego Car Blog, so sometimes we like a good bridge. OK, we’ll show ourselves out, but before we go and have a quite word with ourselves if you suffer from this unfortunate disposition too you can check out of more of Tim Schwalfenberg‘s (brilliant) ‘River Crossing’ at the link.

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Wagon Wheels

Lego Train Wagons

These four beautiful tanker wagons were discovered on Flickr today. Built by Alexander (aka narrow_gauge) they are some of the most intricately detailed (and wonderfully liveried) train creations we’ve come across. See more at Alexander’s photostream via the link above.

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The LEGO Trains Book | Book Review

The Lego Trains Book

Thump. It was just before Christmas, and a brown package slammed onto the hallway floor of TLCB Towers. A dozen TLCB Elves immediately ran towards it, but thwarted by its weight were unable to make off with their prize. A lot of post goes missing here.

Fortunately this TLCB writer is considerably bigger than a TLCB Elf and thus was able to pick up said package and, with some Elves still attached, retreat to the TLCB ‘staffroom’ (an ancient sofa in the corner of the office).

Usually heavy packages received here at TLCB Towers are ‘Cease and Desist’ notifications wrapped around a breeze block from The Brothers Brick, but this time we had a present! No Starch Press; we like you!

The Lego Trains Book

No Starch have been in the Lego book game for a while, consistently churning out books about our favourite plastic building blocks for some years. Their latest publication is this, the 230-page ‘The Lego Trains Book‘ by Holger Matthes.

In compact landscape format and produced in No Starch’s usual glossy high quality form ‘The Lego Trains Book’ really is surprisingly heavy, but does the content live up to the cover?

‘The Lego Trains’ book begins, after a brief Forward and Acknowledgements section, with a chapter detailing the history of LEGO’s official Trains line, following the range from its beginnings in the 1960s, through the battery era, live rail era (this writer’s favourite), to the latest remote control Power Functions sets. It’s a comprehensive compilation of the LEGO Trains history and one that’s sure to be of interest to anyone who loves the theme, although it is perhaps a bit too in-depth for the more casual Lego builder.

The Lego Trains Book

Chapter two is entitled ‘Basic Principles’, and it’s brilliant. Detailing building techniques and parts ratios it’s perfect for any builder of any theme (not just Trains) looking to create more advanced Lego creations. Utilising well-chosen digital depictions the author makes even the more complex techniques easy to understand, and whilst these aren’t quite as high quality visually as LEGO’s own they are good enough to make for useful teaching-aids.

Chapters three and four build upon these techniques with practical application, detailing the considerations and choices available when designing your own train models. This is a very thorough chapter offering insights into a variety of scales, how to ensure models can handle tight corners, how to connect carriages to one another, how to create realistic steam train mechanisms and such like.

It’s a gloriously nerdy section and as such Holger includes links to third-party products and design software that can help a builder reach the utmost level of realism. This may be a bit too in-depth for most builders (ourselves included), but it’s usually better to have too much information than too little.

The Lego Trains Book

The final chapter, which at 100 pages long makes up nearly half the book, is where ‘The Lego Trains Book’ comes alive. Continue reading

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Not a Car

Lego NSW AD60 Steam Locomotive

But one heck of a beautiful steam train. And who doesn’t like steam trains? This particular locomotive is a New South Wales AD60 Class, of which 42 were built in the 1950s. Coming right at the end of the steam’s reign on the railways the AD60 Class were the most powerful locomotives ever used in Australia and this 97 stud long replica packs a punch too, being powered by twin Power Functions XL motors. Alexander of Flickr is the builder behind this stunning recreation of the AD60 and there’s lots more to see, including some ingenious ‘how to’ photos detailing the hidden building techniques, via the link above.

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Blue Comet

Lego Blue Comet Steam Train

Operating from the late 1920s until the early 1940s in New Jersey, the Blue Comet pulled carriages between New York and Atlantic City, taking just three hours to complete the journey (including a ferry crossing to Manhattan Island), and able to reach speeds of over 100mph. This magnificent recreation of one of America’s most beautiful locomotives comes from Flickr’s Cale Leiphart who has faithfully recreated not just the locomotive, but the tender and carriages too. An extensive gallery of superb images is available to view at Cale’s photostream – click the link above to buy your ticket.

Lego Blue Comet Locomotive

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Not a Car

Lego Crane Train

But probably the nicest crane-train thingumy we’ve ever seen. Plus we like trains, and we like cranes, so it’s appearing here. Dario Minisini is the builder and there’s more to see of this lovely mini-figure scale build on Flickr.

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Once Upon a Time in the West

Lego Western Train Robbery

Yes it’s no use saying that you don’t know nothing
It’s still gonna get you if you don’t do something
Sitting on a fence that’s a dangerous course
Oh, you could even catch a bullet from the peace-keeping force
Even the hero gets a bullet in the chest
Oh yeah, once upon a time in the west

Our obscure British music theme continues here at The Lego Car Blog. If that’s not your thing (and if it isn’t, take a long look at yourself), perhaps try this alternative. Oh, the model! This superb Western train robbery scene comes from Flickr’s markus19840420 (there must be a lot of Markuses on Flickr) and there’s more to see by clicking here.

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Mr. Plow

Lego Snow Plow Train

Your Mom likes a good plow, so today we’ve got one. This is a replica of a PKP 411S-121, and it’s been recreated beautifully by Maciej Drwięga of Flickr. Exquisite detail abounds, and you can see all of the superb photos of Maciej’s build at his photostream via the link above.

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