Tag Archives: v8

My Other Truck’s a Truck. And a Bugatti…

…and a whatever this is. Making their TLCB debut with not one but three creations is Wojtek Hildebrandt, who has constructed a trio of alternates for TLCB Lock-Down B-Model Competition.

The first is – apparently – a ‘Mechanical Ant’, built from the Technic 42080 Forest Machine set, and it’s terrifying. Particularly if you’re an Elf, because through a combination of mechanical, pneumatic, and motorised functions, all of those spiky-looking implements can be made to whirl menacingly. There’s articulated steering too, making the ant easily manoeuvrable, and a rotating and raising cabin to get a better view of the carnage occurring beneath. Head to Wojtek’s ‘Mechanical Ant’ album on Flickr by clicking here to see more.

Wojtek’s second contest entry takes the enormous Technic 42078 Mack Anthem set (which includes instructions for one of LEGO’s best B-Models in years), and adds another alternative build, this rather brilliant Mack terminal tractor. A working six-cylinder engine sits alongside the offset cab, which features a rotating seat and working steering. The huge parts source has also allowed Wojtek to build an assortment of towing options, including an articulated trailer and a sliding container mount for the truck itself. Find out more by clicking here.

Wojtek’s final competition entry is even more unusual, and takes one of LEGO’s most iconic recent sets, the spectacular Technic 42083 Bugatti Chiron, to create this; the ‘Bugatti EB-Double’. A twin V8-engined truck complete with a Bugatti grille and taillights from the Chiron, Wojtek’s creation features working steering, a huge deployable rear wing (that operates automatically depending upon which of the four gears is selected), working suspension, and a cab that does something very weird indeed, converting the ‘EB-Double’ into a Mercedes-Benz Renntransporter-esque vehicle for maximum originality points. There’s more to see of Wojtek’s amazing alternate on Flickr – click here to make the jump!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

My Other Car’s a Mustang

We’re just over half way through TLCB’s Lock-Down B-Model Competition, and choosing the winners who will receive an awesome SBrick Plus Pro Pack just got harder! This is Nathanael Kuipers’ entry, a simply brilliant AC Cobra built purely from the parts found within the excellent (and very B-Model-suitable) 10265 Creator Ford Mustang set.

Capturing the look of the ’60s Anglo-American sports car brilliantly, Nathanael’s alternate includes opening doors, hood and trunk, a wonderfully lifelike interior, and a detailed engine too. The Elves are also happy because it two giant racing stripes down the middle of it.

Not only that, Nathanael has made instructions available should you wish to build his Cobra for yourself, earning him extra TLCB points. You can see more of Nathanael’s brilliant 10265 B-Model at his photostream by clicking here, plus you can read a round-up of some of the other alternative builds that the 10265 Ford Mustang set has generated (including a few other designs by Nathanael), by clicking these words.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Streamliner

This is a Tatra T87, and it was one of the fastest and yet most fuel efficient cars of the era. Built from the mid-’30s to early-’50s the T87 was powered by rear-mounted air-cooled 2.9 litre V8 engine which was about half the size of its competitors, yet – thanks to its streamlined shape – it could reach almost 100mph whilst using nearly half the fuel.

The occupying Nazis loved it, calling it ‘the autobahn car’, but so many German officers were killed trying to reach 100mph that the T87 was dubbed ‘the Czech secret weapon’, and they were subsequently banned from driving it.

This brilliant Technic recreation of the Tatra T87 comes from Horcik Designs who has replicated the car’s streamlined shape beautifully from Technic panels. Underneath the aerodynamic body is functioning swing-arm suspension, working steering, and a detailed engine under an opening cover, and there’s more to see of all of that at the Eurobricks discussion forum and at Horcik’s Bricksafe folder.

Click the links above to ty to reach 100mph on the autobahn c1940. Unless you’re a German Army officer.

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Stick a V8 in it

Ask the internet any car-related question and when the answer’s not ‘Miata’, it’s ‘Stick a V8 in it’. More specifically an LS. It seems that’s what builder Zux has done in creating his entry for the current Eurobricks Small Car Contest. Literally.

Before we get onto the engine, Zux’s Technic pick-up truck features some decent functionality, including working suspension front and rear, opening doors, hood and tailgate, and working steering.

Now that engine… It’s not a load that the pick-up is carrying in the second and third images you can see here, rather it is the pick-up’s engine, driven by the rear wheels and making the pick-up’s pick-up-ness completely pointless.

As such Zux has photographed his creation with and without its ridiculous cargo/power-plant, but you can guess which version the Elves preferred….

There’s more to see of Zux’s build on both Flickr and in the Eurobricks forum; ‘stick a V8 in it’ via the links!

Tagged , , , ,

Cut-Away

Lego creations tend to be constructed in a very unrealistic manner. Pieces are attached to one another so that every part is connected to everything else, making a robust, playable model that looks like what it’s supposed to on the outside, and nothing like what it’s supposed to underneath. But we usually only look at the outside, not having x-ray vision and all, so that’s OK. Plus if we had x-ray vision we’d have more important things to do than peer inside Lego creations…

On to today’s creation, and Sebeus I has decided to design a creation that is constructed in the same way a real car would be. Or, more accurately, a model kit of a car. Sebeus has constructed each component of his Model Team style supercar separately, including the ‘carbon fibre’ tub, V8 engine, axle, steering and suspension assemblies, dashboard, battery, and body panels, each of which is then attached to the model independently.

The result is a model that you have to build twice, firstly in Lego form; constructing each of the components, and then in kit form; assembling the components into the finished car. This is magnificently pointless, but also looks rather fun, with the side benefit that you can half-build the model’s bodywork to see all of its components like a motor show cut-away. It’s an intriguing way to design a Lego car and if you’re interested to see more (and support Sebeus’ design on LEGO Ideas so it could become an official LEGO set) you can do so on Flickr and Eurobricks via these links.

Tagged , , , ,

Little LMP

Eurobricks’ Small Car Contest continues to generate some wonderful creations. One of our favourites is this, thirdwigg‘s excellent LMP (Le Mans Prototype) racing car. Working steering, a miniature functioning V8 engine, removable bodywork, and a surprisingly detailed chassis all feature, and there’s more to see on Flickr via the link above.

Tagged , , , , ,

Small Supercar

This brilliant little Technic Ferrari F40 was discovered by one of our Elves today, and it continues the run of excellent small-scale supercars being generated by the Eurobricks Small Car contest. Built by previous bloggee paave it features a wealth of functionality that you’d normally expect to find in a model much larger, including a working V8 engine, steering, pop-up headlights, and opening doors, front truck and clamshell engine cover. There’s more to see at the Eurobricks forum and you can make the jump there via the link above.

Tagged , , , , , ,

Under the Dome

Eurobricks’ ‘Small Car Competition’ has generated some superb creations. Each measuring no more than fifteen studs wide and forty-one studs long, entries must be able to fit on the 42098 Technic Car Transporter set, yet many are still packed with Technic functionality.

This is one of our favourites, Zsolt Nagy’s ‘Red Sky’ supercar, complete with a transparent cockpit dome, working steering, a V8 engine driven by the rear wheels, and – amazingly – front and rear suspension!

You can see how Zsolt has done it at both Eurobricks and Flickr, and we’ll update you on some of the brilliant entries that we’ve received so far for TLCB’s own B-Model competition tomorrow!

Tagged , , ,

VAG BUG

Today’s creation might sound like something you picked up on that trip to Thailand, but it is in fact the dubious name given to this marvellous Technic Volkswagen Beetle buggy by its maker, februar88. Stupendous in its appearance, februar88’s creation includes four drive motors – with one L Motor powering each wheel, plus Servo steering, a V8 engine (turned by a Medium Motor), mega suspension, opening and locking doors, LED lights, and SBrick programmable bluetooth control. There’s lots more to see – including a video of the bug in action – at the Eurobricks discussion forum. Take your penicillin and learn a valuable lesson about using protection via the link above.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Lawmen are Crooks, the Good Guys are Outlaws and Ever’body’s In-Laws!

We didn’t get ‘The Dukes of Hazzard’ here in TLCB’s home nation, but we wish we had. After all, what’s not to like about a Dodge Charger jumping over  a river, a tractor, a train, a barn, a truck full of outhouses, a truck full of barrels… you get the idea.

Unfortunately this meant hundreds of ’69 Dodge Chargers – now incredibly valuable cars – were sacrificed in the name of entertainment, but they were a bit less valuable in the ’70s and ’80s.

Flickr’s Chris Radbone has put one back though, with his enormous Model Team recreation of the Duke Boys’ ’69 Dodge Charger ‘General Lee’, complete with working steering, a V8 engine, a 5-speed gearbox, and authentic ’01’ decals and flag-with-slightly-racist-connotations on the roof.

His near 8kg model also includes working suspension, so presumably he can jump it over various household obstacles in proper ‘Dukes of Hazzard’ fashion. Head to Chris’ photostream to join the good ‘ol boys!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Alternative Lifestyle

No, we’re not talking about your cousin James.

Much of the world, including here at The Lego Car Blog, is in lockdown. The COVID-19 epidemic is claiming thousands of lives now, with the potential for millions if it reaches poorer nations. As such many of us have been instructed – by law – to remain inside. If you’re reading this post in the future; yeah this was that thing old people always talk about. And if your world is some kind of nearly-empty post-apocalyptic society; yeah this was that thing where everyone died.

On a less pessimistic note, if we all stay inside we’re probably going to be fine, the world will get back to normal, and we’ll look back and wonder what all the fuss was about. So to help us to do just that, here’s TLCB ‘Alternative Lifestyle’ suggestion, or to give it its working title; ‘Something to do during Coronavirus’.

LEGO’s brilliant 10265 Creator Ford Mustang set is one of our very favourite additions to their officially licensed line-up, and – being packed with great parts – it has spawned an entire car dealership of alternate builds. This is the latest, the work of a past LEGO set designer no less, Nathanael Kuipers. Built using only parts found within the 10265 set, this Ford GT40-esque classic supercar features working steering, opening doors and engine cover, and removable V8 engine.

Nathanael has made instructions available too, so if you own a 10265 Ford Mustang set and you’re stuck at home bored you can convert your set into your very own GT40. Find out how via the link above, and if you fancy building a few more vehicles from your 10265 set, take a look below!

Dodge Charger R/T (Firas Abu-Jaber): This 10265 B-Model featured here last month, built by Flickr’s Firas Abu-Jaber this superb Dodge Charger R/T looks so perfect you’d never know it was a set alternate. It’s even modifiable with a huge supercharger like the original set, so if you’re of an Elven persuasion you can build it to your tastes too. Check out the original post here where you can find a link to all the images.

Tesla Cybertruck (Gerald Cacas): Tesla’s yet-to-be released and decidedly odd Cybertruck is not a vehicle we expected to be built from the 10265 Ford Mustang set, yet Gerald Cacas has done just that with this excellent alternate. Gerald promises instructions are on the way so you can build one yourself – take a look at its original appearance here to find the links.

DeTomaso Pantera GTS (Serge S): Powered by a Ford V8 like the Mustang from which it’s built, the DeTomaso Pantera was a genuine alternative to the Ferraris and Lamborghinis of its day. If you own the 10265 set you can build one for yourself, as Serge S has constructed this superb Pantera GTS using parts only found within it. Instructions are available and you can find a link to them and the full gallery of images via this link to Serge’s original appearance here in January, long before someone ate an illegal bat soup and started a worldwide pandemic.

Ford F100 Pick-Up (Nathanael Kuipers): The Ford GT40 at the top of this page isn’t the only 10265 B-Model to come from Nathanael, as back in October last year he published this Ford F100 inspired classic pick-up. There are opening doors, an opening hood, and a dropping tailgate, and most importantly he’s produced building instructions so that you can build it for yourself. Find out more via the original post by clicking here.

Ford Mustang GT500 (Firas Abu-Jaber): Our sixth and final 10265 Ford Mustang alternate is… a Ford Mustang. But it jumps forward about 55 years, bringing Ford’s latest 2020 GT500 into brick form. Best of all, like every other model on this page this incredible GT500 can be built using only the parts found within the 10265 set, giving you two Mustangs for the price of one! Building instructions are available and you can find a link to them and the complete image gallery by clicking here.

Finally, if you don’t wish to dismantle your 10265 Ford Mustang set but you do want something to do with it, try Game Of Brick’s spectacular lighting kit that was reviewed here by a reader at the start of the year.

And so ends our ‘Something to do during Coronavirus’ post, with six brilliant alternative models that can be constructed from just the pieces found within the 10265 Creator Ford Mustang set. You can find links to all six in the text above, almost all of which include building instructions. Stay safe, stay indoors, and give alternate building a go! If the current lockdown continues we may even award some loot for your best B-Model builds.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Classic Hit & Run

The Elves have been relatively peaceful of late. By which we mean none of the creations that they’ve found have been fast enough to smush one-another into the office carpet. That ended today.

This is Lachlan Cameron (aka Lox Lego)’s spectacular Ford F100 hot rod, built as a commissioned piece and featuring full remote control drive, a V8 engine, opening doors and deck-lid, and with some of the most inventive custom decals we’ve seen yet (check out the stitching on the seats!).

The Elf at the controls couldn’t care less about the seat stitching though, because Lachlan’s creation can be driven by XL or Buggy motors and – in this case – is powered by a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery delivering up to eight times the power of LEGO’s own unit.

With all-wheel-drive Lachlan’s creation put that power down very effectively in the halls of TLCB Towers, as the Elf at the controls inevitably used its find to wreak havoc upon its Elven colleagues. Due to the F100’s ground scraping ride height however, no Elves were technically smushed, instead being catapulted over the bonnet, so our smush-free streak is kinda still going. We still have some tidying up to do though.

Whilst we get on with that you can check out more of Lachlan’s stunning F100 hot rod at the Eurobricks forum and at his 70+ photo Flickr album which shows the Ford in a variety of wheel and tyre combinations. Lachlan has also made instructions available via the links above should you wish to build his design for yourself, plus you can check out his interview here at The Lego Car Blog as the newest addition to the Master MOCers series by clicking these words.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

CARtoon

How do you see where you’re going when your dragster’s pulling a wheelie? Krass & Bernie have the answer, with their patented Beetle Dragster! A piece of automotive artwork from George Trosley in the ‘CARtoons’ magazine, Krass & Bernie’s creation was powered by both a huge mid-mounted V8 and the engine from a Volkswagen Beetle, which we don’t suspect is adding much.

Canter-levered out the back, with a precarious chain linking the Bug’s engine to the rear wheels (which are kinda the Beetle’s front wheels), the Volkswagen’s shell becomes a level cockpit when the dragster’s front wheels are pointing at the sky. Genius! We think…

This brilliant recreation of Trosley’s unique design comes from Brick Flag (making his second appearance today), and he’s even built cartoon hot rodders Krass & Bernie to go with it. Head to a very tilted drag strip somewhere in a CARtoons magazine via the link above!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Nine Second Nailhead

Whilst it might look like the dreams of a TLCB Elf that’s been eating a glue stick all night, this specularly shiny creation by Flickr’s ianying616 is based upon a real vehicle. And what a real vehicle…

Built by drag racing legend Tommy Ivo in the late 1950s, the ‘Twin Buick’ dragster was the first gasoline powered dragster to run under nine seconds, recording an 8.69. Powered by two Buick ‘Nailhead’ V8s mounted side-by-side, the car was also the first to record speeds over 170, 175 and 180mph.

Tommy went on to build several other wild drag racers throughout the ’60s and 70’s whilst also sidelining as sit-com actor. Now in his 80s he was inducted into the Motorsports Hall of Fame in 2005, with his racers still appearing at shows around the world.

Ianying’s expertly presented recreation of Tommy’s ‘Twin Buick’ captures the insanity of the real car brilliantly and there is a huge gallery of further imagery to see on Flickr. Click the link above to head to the strip and buckle up for the most exciting nine seconds of your life*.

*Insert your own ‘Your Mom’ joke.

Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Mad Collab

The Future Belongs to the Mad. Especially when they collaborate. 2015’s ‘Mad Max: Fury Road’ thundered into cinemas to surprising critical acclaim. Directed my George Miller (he of Happy Feet fame!), ‘Fury Road’ followed the terribly-named ‘Mad Max: Beyond the Thunderdome’ film released a full three decades previously, and it was bloody brilliant!

It’s not often that TLCB Staff and TLCB Elves are in agreement, but this is a movie that brought harmony between TLCB’s human overlords and its irritating mythical workforce. Until the little turds started reenacting scenes from the film in the corridors of TLCB Towers at least.

‘Mad Max: Fury Road’ starred many incredible vehicles, all of which were build for real, and many of these have been recreated in Lego form over the past five years (you can use the search function to find those that have appeared here). However, despite only appearing briefly in the third Mad Max instalment, it’s the V8 Interceptor that has endured as the franchise’s most iconic car.

Based on a 1970s Ford Falcon XB GT Hardtop, the V8 Interceptor appeared in all three movies, and is arguably more associated with the Mad Max story than the fleshy meatbag/s that drove it. This is the version of the Interceptor from the final (for now) film, and it’s been created through the collaboration of builders Mikhail Biktimirov, FX6000, and photographer Nikolay Gamurar.

With remote control drive and steering, working independent front and solid-axle rear suspension, and opening doors and hood, Mikhail, FX6000 and Nikolay’s beautifully presented V8 Interceptor is definitely worth a closer look. FX6000 has also made building instructions available too, should you wish to pretend your kitchen floor is post-apocalyptic wasteland and reenact scenes from the movies.

The Elves will certainly be doing that, so whilst we keep a careful eye on proceedings you can see more of Mikhail, FX6000 and Nikolay’s brilliant Mad Max V8 Interceptor collaboration at the Eurobricks discussion forum by clicking here.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: