Tag Archives: v8

Super Size Me

The Ford F150 is as American as a clown-based burger joint. However, unlike Ronald McDonald’s finest slices of cow*, it’s so enormous it isn’t available in TLCB’s home nation. It just wouldn’t fit.

Of course America can go one size larger than even the F150, or rather, a few hundred sizes…

This is the Ford F550, which by TLCB maths is 267% bigger than the already massive F150 pick-up. This is so it can tow boats, camper-trailers, and four-wheelers, although we suspect most F550s are used to drive to, well… a McDonalds, with absolutely nothing in the back beyond a ‘Keep America Great!’ bumper sticker.

The Technic recreation of the super-sized F150 you can see here is rather smaller than the real deal, but it’s still packed with functions. These include a working V8 engine, steering by both ‘Hand of God’ and the steering wheel, plus opening doors, hood and tailgate.

Flickr’s LoMaC is the builder, there are building instructions available, and lots more to see at LoMaC’s ‘Ford F550 Heavy Duty’ album. Click the link above to go super size.

*Even our regular Big Macs are much smaller than the American versions. That’s why fat kids buy two.

Slowly Sovieting

Some might think today’s title could refer to Russia’s creeping direction under its definitely fairly  democratically elected President, but – fortunately for us as we don’t want to experience Novichok poisoning – it also relates perfectly to this; Sariel’s amazing fully remote controlled pneumatic and motorised Ural 375D 6×6 truck.

Sariel‘s latest astonishing creation is a spectacularly engineered replica of the mighty Soviet military truck, built entirely from Lego pieces, plus a few choice third-party-supplied enhancements.

The first of these is an SBrick bluetooth controller, which allows the four-motor 6×6 drive, steering, servo-powered 3-speed gearbox, three pneumatically locking differentials, and Brickstuff LED lights to all be controlled remotely via a mobile phone or other bluetooth device.

Sariel has further enhanced his model with RC4WD ‘Rock Crusher’ tyres, fitted to Lego rims and mounted to live axle suspension on axles 1 and 3, with pendular suspension on axle 2. A motorised rear winch, working V8 engine, opening doors and hood, and a canvas load cover complete the build, and make Sariel’s Ural one of the most realistic and technically accurate trucks of the year so far.

There’s a whole lot more of this incredible creation to see at the Eurobricks forum, plus the complete gallery of stunning imagery is available to view on Flickr, where there are even a few images that seem to depict a TLCB Elf in shot, but we might be imagining that.

You can also check out a video of the Ural 375D 6×6 in action below, in which the working functions, bare chassis, and a pug named Muffin can all be viewed.

YouTube Video

Seventies Stripes

That’s probably not what the ‘SS’ part of the Chevrolet Chevelle SS’s name stood for, but it may as well have been if you’re a TLCB Elf. They really like stripes.

This magnificent fully RC recreation of the 1970 Chevelle SS by Jakub Marcisz features two most excellent stripes over its hood and trunk, which by TLCB maths add at least 50bhp.

Power Functions remote control equips Jakub’s model with drive and steering, there’s a two-speed gearbox, all-wheel suspension, opening doors, hood and trunk, and LED lights.

A sizeable gallery of images is available via Jakub’s ‘Chevrolet Chevelle SS 1970’ album on Flickr, plus you can see full details and a video of the model in action at the Eurobricks discussion forum here.

The Best Car Ever!*

*Well, according to The Straight Pipes at least.

Lexus are a curious car company. They make immensely dull econo-boxes like this, the ugliest car in the entire world, Jeremy Clarkson’s favourite car of all time, and then this; the stunning LC500, described by The Straight Pipes as the best car they’ve ever driven.

That might be going a bit far, but an atmospheric V8 in a car that looks like a concept from 2035 is quite a rare thing, so maybe they have a point.

This superb Model Team version of Lexus’ current flagship comes from previous bloggee Lasse Deleuran (aka gtahelper) who, um… owns one of Lexus’ dull econo-boxes. Still, his real-life Lexus CT200h is the same shade of red as his brilliant LC500 model, so they have at least one thing in common other than the badge.

There’s more of Lasse’s fiendishly complicated and utterly wonderful Lexus LC500 Coupe to see on Brickshelf, and you can take a look via the link in the text above.

Red Lorry, Yel… Oh

Just a red lorry, but an excellent one. Looking remarkably life-life for a Technic creation, newcomer levs_lego_technic_creation‘s Scania R-Series features working steering, a V8 engine under the tilting cab, opening doors, and a functioning trailer hitch. Instructions are available and there’s more to see on Eurobricks via the link above.

Dodgy Drag

This Elves are very excited today. Not only does this excellent 1970 Dodge Challenger feature a hood scoop (Elf points), many drag racing modifications (more Elf points), and a brick built nitrous kit (even more Elf points), it’s fully remote controlled too, with LEGO’s monstrous Buggy Motor driving the rear wheels.

A Servo powers the steering, not that you’ll really need that at the drag strip (in this case TLCB office corridor), there’s working suspension (independent front and live-axle rear), plus opening doors, hood, and trunk.

It’s a mega bit of kit and one we fully intend to drive up and down the corridor to much Elven whooping until the battery is flat. Whilst we get on with that arduous testing you can check out more of Michael217’s awesome creation at both Eurobricks and Bricksafe – click the links to take a look!

AMG AdVantage

Aston Martin have always been on the brink of financial ruin. However the late ’00s proved something of a renaissance for the firm. Out from Ford control they created some beautiful and rather good supercars, which – in an unusual turn of events – actually made them some money.

The cars have got even better since then, but sadly the financial woes have returned. Hopes are pinned on the new DBX SUV, which is sad state of affairs but we suppose the Cayenne saved Porsche, and – horrible though it is – selling SUVs allowed the brand to survive and keep making 911s.

Aston Martin have also received some new investment, firstly from Mercedes-Benz AMG, who now supply their engines and electrics, and secondly from Canadian billionaire Lawrence Stroll.

If that name’s familiar to you it’s because he’s F1 driver Lance Stroll’s father, who ‘coincidentally’   now owns the team his son drives for, Racing Point, previously Force India.

Racing Point will become ‘Aston Martin Racing’ for the 2021 season, which fills us with dread (remember Ford shoving Jaguar into Formula 1 back in the early ’00s?…), but we guess it makes marginally more sense than their pointless current sponsorship of Red Bull Racing, who use Honda engines and have absolutely nothing to do with Aston Martin whatsoever, besides banking a cheque that could be better spent on literally anything else.

Anyway, we hope it works out, because Aston Martin can still build some wonderful cars, such as this; the AMG-powered V8 Vantage.

This excellent Model Team recreation of the 2018 V8 Vantage comes from previous bloggee Alexander Paschoaletto, and he’s captured the real car brilliantly. Opening doors and hood reveal a detailed interior and engine bay respectively, and there’s more of the build to see at Alexander’s ‘Aston Martin V8 Vantage’ album on Flickr.

Click the link above to take a look, and cross your fingers for Aston Martin in 2021…

Can-Am Classic

This unusually-hued creation is a 1970s Can-Am racer, from a time when huge V8s and top motorsport teams combined to create some of the coolest racing cars on earth.

Can-Am ran from the mid-’60s to the mid-’80s, with McLaren, Porsche, Lola and others fielding some wild creations, many of which pioneered turbo-charging, downforce, and even – in the case of the Chaparral 2J – using a snowmobile engine to suck the car to ground, years before Brabham did the same in Formula 1.

This generic mid-’70s Can-Am racer comes from Flickr’s michaelablinger, who has captured the aesthetic of the time brilliantly, further enhancing his model with period-correct decals from Michelin, NGK, Magneti Marelli and others.

A detailed cockpit, realistic chassis including a V8 engine and brick-built ‘suspension’, opening doors and removable rear bodywork all feature, and there are lots more images to see at Michael’s photostream.

Head to the racetrack c1974 via the link above.

Smokey and the Bandit | Picture Special

This is a Pontiac Firebird Trans-Am, a car made famous by the ’77 movie ‘Smokey and the Bandit’, and possibly the only car in history to look kinda-cool with pin-striping. Plus a giant flaming bird motif of course.

This exceptional 1:8 recreation of the American icon is the work of Chris Radbone of Flickr, who has not only replicated the exterior of the ’77 Trans-Am beautifully, complete with pin-striping and giant flaming bird motif, his model is a qualified Technic Supercar underneath.

A Technic frame holds a working V8 engine, all-wheel suspension, functioning steering, and a D-N-R gearbox, all of which are concealed behind the wonderfully accurate Model Team exterior.

It’s a great way to finish the year and there’s more to see of Chris’s superb ’77 Pontiac Firebird Trans-Am ‘Bandit’ at his photostream. Click here to make the jump to Flickr for the complete gallery of images, here to see the Smokey and the Bandit movie trailer in which this car stars, and we’ll be back soon with our 2020 round-up.

Little Red Wagon | Picture Special

It’s 1965, and drag-racers Jim Schaeffer and John Collier have got their hands on a Dodge A100 ‘forward-control’ truck. The pair decided to install a 426 Hemi in the bed, and any non-essential items were removed. The resulting ‘Little Red Wagon’ was the world’s fastest 1/4 mile truck, setting an eleven second time at the first attempt. However, the modifications also tilted the weight bias rearward a bit…

The unintended consequences of this rear-biased weight distribution were a vehicle that proffered to drive only on its back wheels, and in fact the ‘Little Red Wagon’ could complete an entire 1/4 mile race without the front wheels ever touching the ground.

Such crowd-pleasing shenanigans caught the attention of Dodge, who not only used the ‘Little Red Wagon’ in commercials, they all arranged for its purchase by Super Stock Champion Bill Golden to use as the first ‘competition wheelstander’, a class it created single handedly.

Of course having your front wheels in the air limited steering somewhat, and the ‘Little Red Wagon’ crashed in 1969. And 1971. And 1975. That last wreck took the truck out of service, and Golden converted a new truck to continue his wheel standing antics, setting the Guinness World Record for the longest (at nearly 3/4 of a mile!) in 1977 and racing it until his retirement in 2003.

Today a recreation of the ‘Little Red Wagon’ tours alongside the wrecked original, whilst Golden’s own replacement wheel standing truck sold for over $500,000 in 2009.

Flickr’s Brick Flag, who is fast becoming one of our favourite builders here at TLCB, has converted his own Dodge A100 model into a ‘Little Red Wagon’ wheelstander, with his spectacular Model Team version amalgamating the different versions of the real truck that were built over the years.

Superb design, detailing, and decals are evident in abundance and there’s heaps more to see at Brick’s ’60s Dodge Little Red Wagon’ album on Flickr. Click the link above to head down the drag strip on just your back wheels, and here to see the real ‘Little Red Wagon’ in action courtesy of a glorious period video!

Bone Crusher*

Inspired by a Hot Wheels toy, and named after an obese rapper or one of the giants in the BFG, this is Tim Inman‘s ‘Bone Crusher’; a V8-powered hot rod pick-up with a giant skull on the front. And on the rear deck. And with bones for seats. The Elves, predictably, think it’s the greatest vehicle of all time, and you can see more of Tim’s creation on Flickr via the link.

*Today’s title song. ‘Cause we’re street.

Furry Road

Don’t worry, we’re not referring to one of your Mom’s old movies.

TLCB Elves are grumpy today. Despite a slew of finds they missed this one, which we instead saw on The Brothers Brick. And they love Mad Max. We’re not sure they follow the plot, but stuff explodes quite regularly and that seems to please them.

Anyway, those of you with a keener eye will have noticed that something is amiss with Michael Kanemoto‘s rendition of the ‘V8 Interceptor’ from the movie, what with it being red and yellow and driven by a cartoon dog.

That’s because Michael’s ‘V8 Interceptor’ is part of a wider ‘Fab Max’ collaboration, mixing LEGO’s primary-coloured 1980s Fabuland theme with George Miller’s post-apocalyptic road movie, and in doing so creating a desolate wasteland inhabited by cute (but violent) anthropomorphic critters. Kinda like TLCB Towers.

Complete with officer Max “Bark”-tansky of the Fab Force Patrol there’s more to see of Micheal’s ‘Fab Max V8 Interceptor’ via the link above (plus you can also find the original black version of the car which is frankly boring by comparison), and – if you’re as in to this theme as we are – you can see another ‘Fab Max – Furry Road’ creation blogged at TLCB by clicking here.

Waterloo Station. And Make it Quick!

Black Cabs are absolutely not fast. They are filthy smog spreading abominations though, and fortunately London has had enough and decreed only EVs and PHEVs now qualify to become Black Cabs. Fortunately the newly-renamed London Electric Vehicle Company, now owned by Geely (Volvo’s deep-pocketed owners), have built a new black cab fit for the 21st century, and it’s a delight. Plus it’s not poisoning us all like the last Black Cabs were, with a 1.5 litre Volvo petrol engine never driving the wheels, instead providing a range extension to the EV batteries.

Whilst we won’t mourn the loss of the soot-spewing old taxis, TLCB favourite and Master MOCer Redfern 1950s seems to, having created this ‘V8 Drag Car’ that to us looks a lot like an old Hackney Carriage (the technical term for London’s cabs) with an enormous V8 shoved in it.

It sure wouldn’t meet London’s new licensed-hire emissions rules, but we bet it’d get us across London a heck of lot faster. Actually that’s not true, crossing London is about as quick on a push-bike as it is in a Porsche, but it would be more fun! There’s more to see of of Red’s ‘V8 Drag Car’ (aka ‘Hackney Rod’, as named by us just now) at his photostream, plus you can learn how he creates brilliant models like this one at his Master MOCers interview via the link in the text above.

The Boss

The muscle car market has gone mad in recent years. Upwards of 700bhp is now available from stock, and whilst many modern muscles cars have now added revolutionary new technologies such as ‘steering’ and ‘suspension’, we suspect actually using all that power is a difficult thing to do. Resulting in happenings like this. And this. And this. And this.

Things were little different back in the late ’60s, when the first power race between muscle car makers began. This was one of Ford’s efforts from the time; the Mustang Boss 429. The ‘429’ moniker stood for the V8 engine’s cubic inch capacity, which translates to seven litres. Seven. Most European cars at the time made do with just over one.

Of course the Boss’s steering, braking and suspension were – in true muscle car tradition – woefully inadequate, meaning that morons-with-daddy’s-money in 1969 could plow their new car into a street light in much the same way as they do today, only without the event being captured on YouTube.

Today though, we’re joining the muscle car crashing fraternity too, thanks to Hogwartus, and this superb SBrick-powered remote control Technic Boss 429.

Driven by two L Motors, with a Medium Motor turning the steering and another controlling the four-speed sequential gearbox, Hogwartus’s creation is a riot to drive. That is until we spun it into a kitchen cabinet. We’ll blame the Mustang-accurate torsion bar rear suspension for that faux-par. The front suspension is independent though, and the model also includes opening and locking doors, hood and trunk, a replica 7-litre V8 engine (that turns via the drive motors), sliding seats, and LED headlights.

There’s more to see of Hogwartus’s stunning Technic ’69 Mustang Boss 429 at the Eurobricks forum by clicking here, plus via the truly excellent video below, which must be one of the few Mustang videos on YouTube that don’t end like this.

YouTube Video

Sideways in the Soviet Union

Matthew Terentev’s Volga/GAZ-2402 station wagon has appeared here before, being a somewhat unusual choice for a Technic ‘Supercar’, with working steering, engine, and suspension. He’s now gone a step further though, replacing the miserable inline 4-cylinder engine with a V8 (which the real 2402 was actually available with), and he’s added a whole host of other exciting modifications including lowered suspension, aero, and – most importantly – racing decals and stripes, which are worth at least an extra 200bhp on their own.

We’re not sure how suited a Volga/GAZ station wagon is to drifting (about as much as your Mom is to the 110m hurdles we suspect), but because we’re rather sad here at TLCB we love unlikely cars turned into racers. Plus the Elves would’ve have rioted had we not blogged a drift car with racing stripes.

There’s more to see of Matthew’s drifty GAZ-2402 station wagon (and the unmodified permit-only family car on which it’s based) at his photostream. Go sideways in the Soviet Union via the link above!