Tag Archives: v8

Summer of ’69*

LEGO’s new 10265 Ford Mustang set has us yearning for more officially-licensed muscle cars. There’s hope too, as this particular Detroit classic has already been released as a Speed Champions set. It is of course the stupendous ’69 Dodge Charger R/T, the wildest muscle car of the era, and one that’s become famous to whole new generation of fans thanks to the Fast and Furious movie franchise.

This brilliant recreation of Dodge’s over-powered, under-suspended icon is the work of previous bloggee Tony Bovkoon, who has built his Charger R/T to match the scale and detail of the official Ford Mustang set. Working steering, opening doors, hood, trunk, and a detailed interior all feature, and there’s more to see of this superb creation at Tony’s ’69 Dodge Charger R/T album on Flickr via the link above.

*Nope, we’re not doing a link to today’s title song, because any DJ** that ends the night by playing it needs to go have a quiet think about how they can do better.

**For our younger readers; a DJ is sort of like if your Spotify playlist were a person.

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8081-ish

Some things are better left alone. Any forum on Mumsnet for example. The comments section of the Daily Mail website. Your Mom’s ‘Special Friends’ chest. However the LEGO Technic 8081 ‘Extreme Cruiser’ set is not one of them.

Reviewed here at The Lego Car Blog by reader Thirdwigg a few years ago, he noted that the 8081 set “taunts you to be creative. It screams at you to improve it; to make it better, and it gives you plenty of the space and a great structure to do so.” Which is handy because 8081 is… well, not particularly good.

Not so this version though. Taking his own advice, Thirdwigg as fully repurposed the decidedly average 8081 Extreme Cruiser set into this most excellent Land Rover Defender 110 style off-roader, complete with four-wheel-drive (which the original set didn’t have), a V8 engine (which the original set didn’t have either), working suspension and steering (which it did), and huge Fischertechnic tyres (which it definitely didn’t).

The result looks marvellous and there’s more to see of Thridwigg’s 8081-inspired 4×4 at both his Flickr photostream and the Eurobricks discussion forum (which, unlike Mumsnet, is forum which won’t leave you terrified for the future of humanity).

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McLaren 720S | Picture Special

McLaren are one of the ever expanding list of vehicle manufacturers to partner with LEGO, in probably the best move LEGO has made in, well… ever. From life-size replicas to small scale Speed Champions sets, there’s a LEGO McLaren for everyone. Except for Technic fans.

Eurobricks member Charbel aims to rectify this, with his stunning Technic McLaren 720S. Two years in the making Charbel’s 720S forgoes Power Functions motors in favour of some serious mechanical functionality, including an 8-speed sequential gearbox, independent suspension, a working V8 engine, opening butterfly doors, active rear wing, and working steering.

Charbel’s creation is also adopts a completely modular construction and there’s a whole lot more to see at the Eurobricks forum at the link above, or via Charbel’s beautifully presented video below.

YouTube Video

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I Ain’t Afraid of No Ghost

If there’s something strange in you neighborhood
Who you gonna call? (Ghostbusters!)
If there’s something weird
And it don’t look good
Who you gonna call? (Ghostbusters!)
I ain’t afraid of no ghost
I ain’t afraid of no ghost
If you’re seeing things running through your head
Who you gonna call? (Ghostbusters!)
An invisible man
Sleeping in your bed
Who you gonna call? (Ghostbusters!)

 

This excellent (and enormous) Technic recreation of the ‘Ecto-1’ Cadillac Ambulance from ‘Ghostbusters’ comes from thewdarren of Flickr and it’s packed with bustin’ paraphernalia. And a V8 engine, because that’s cool. There’s loads more to see at thewdarren’s Ecto-1 album via the link above, you can check out LEGO’s own official Ghostbusters set here, and you can watch the video for very probably coolest movie theme ever by clicking here!

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Anglo-American

Despite a politically strained relationship at present, the United Kingdom and the Unites States of America can achieve great things when they work together. Here are two of the greatest, the magnificent Ford GT40 and AC Cobra.

Both cars were designed in the UK, but powered (and funded by) Ford USA, and both dominated racing in the 1960s. These two brilliant Speed Champions style models of the Gulf Racing GT40 and Cobra 289 are the work of previous bloggee Jonathan Elliott who has captured each car beautifully.

There’s more to see of each build at Jonathan’s photostream – click the links above to take a look at the complete image galleries for both cars.

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Rocket II

Following today’s earlier post the Elves were most unimpressed. Peaceful river trips are not really their bag after all. However giant chrome 1,000bhp Hemi-engined trikes very much are.

This ridiculous looking device is the ‘Rocket II’, a real supercharged trike built by Englishman Tim Cotterill (aka Frogman) so named because he designs little metal frogs (…we suppose someone has to?)

Built in the the U.S and fitted with a drag racing motor Tim’s trike is very possibly the most dangerous vehicle we’ve ever posted (apart from this one of course). This spectacular Technic recreation of the Rocket II comes from previous bloggee ianying616 of Flickr, who has captured the insanity of the real vehicle perfectly in Lego form.

A huge gallery of images is available to view via the link above, plus you can watch a video of when Jay Leno met the owner (and the Rocket II) on YouTube by clicking here.

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GT4586

Lego Toyari GT4586

Ok, this might be digital, but it’s too cool not to post! This is a GT4586. What’s that you ask? The 4.5 litre V8 engine from a Ferrari 458 fitted inside the engine bay (mostly) of a Toyota GT86. The result is one hell of a drift car, and it’s street legal too, as builder/racer Ryan Tuerck demonstrates in this rather excellent video. Sadly the real car is no more following an accident, but TLCB favourite Simon Przepiorka has brought the Toyrari/Feryota back to life in Lego form with this awesome-looking render. Make the jump to see more via the link!

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Crashing Inevitability

Lego Ford Mustang GT500

Ford’s Mustang is one the best examples of model rediscovering its mojo in the car industry. After the woeful Mustang II, and not much better Mustang III, Ford got it right from 2004 and more so since then, even adding independent suspension to the current generation (only 95 years behind Europe, but still…).

The latest Mustang is now sold in Europe too, with modern EcoBoost turbo engines and steering which actually, you know… works. But it wouldn’t be a Mustang without an enormously over-powered version that will inevitably do something like this. Or this. Or this.

Cue the 2020 GT500*, which – with over 700bhp from its 5 litre V8 – has more than enough power to crash through an entire carpark. This glorious homage to Ford’s silliest muscle car is the work of TLCB Master MOCer Firas Abu-Jaber, who has captured the new GT500 beautifully.

There’s opening doors, trunk lid and hood, under which sits a brick-built recreation of the GT500’s enormously unnecessary power-plant. Head over to Firas’ photostream for the complete gallery of images, before someone drives it off the desk in a manner similar to this.

Lego Ford Mustang GT500

*a) How do American cars time-travel, and b) Why is it not the GT700? Answers in the comments.

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Maranello Magnum

Lego Ferarri 308 GTS

This is a Ferrari 308 GTS, made (more) famous by its continued appearance in 1980s Hawaii-based drama ‘Magnum PI’, and built from 1975 in Maranello Italy before being replaced a decade later by the 328.

Designed by Pininfarina the 308 also has the claim of being the slowest Ferrari ever made, as a 2 litre version (known as the 208) was produced to dodge a tax in Italy that applied to cars over 2000cc. Strangely the 208 was still a V8, just a pointlessly small one, and thankfully ‘Magnum PI’s Thomas Magnum got the proper 2.9 litre 240bhp version.

This excellent recreation of Magnum’s mid-’80s Ferrari 308 GTS comes from Flickr’s Peter Blackert aka Lego911 and there’s more to see at his photostream via the link.

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More Mustang

Lego Ford Mustang GT Fastback

LEGO’s brilliant new 10265 Creator Expert Ford Mustang set is getting all the attention right now, but there are still builders creating their own stunning renditions of America’s most famous pony car. One such builder is Flickr’s Dornbi, who has spent the last few months creating this beautiful replica of a ’65 GT Fastback. The doors and trunk open, as does the hood under which is a nicely recreated V8 engine, and there’s more to see of Dornbi’s excellent Mustang GT via the link above.

Lego Ford Mustang GT Fastback

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Muscle Car Double

Lego Plymouth Hemi Cuda

Founded in the late 1920s, mis-managed into administration, and then closed down in the last decade or so, Plymouth and Pontiac are best known in recent times as victims of the Big Three’s sorry tale of arrogance, greed and incompetence.

But before all that there were some good times. Really good times. In the late-’60s to early-’70s the muscle car was in a golden age, and both Plymouth and Pontiac were riding the crest of that wave.

Plymouth’s Barracuda (above) launched in the mid-’60s with a range of engines beginning at just 100bhp, yet by 1970 it was making up to 425bhp from an enormous Hemi V8. Unfortunately 425bhp didn’t sit really suit the market once the oil crisis hit in 1973, and production ended shortly afterwards, but if anything that short life has helped the ‘Cuda become one of most sought-after muscle cars in history.

General Motors were also in on the muscle car action in the 1960s, bringing – via their Pontiac brand – the GTO (below) to market in ’64. By the 1970s they too were making over 400bhp, with stock cars delivering 13.4 second 1/4 miles times straight from the forecourt. Like Plymouth the oil crisis put an end to that, but in its hay-day the Pontiac GTO sold almost 100,000 units annually, despite its slow steering and ‘amazingly inadequate’ brakes. The roads must have been a fun (if slightly terrifying) place!

Lego Pontiac GTO

The two superb Speed Champions versions of the Plymouth Hemi ‘Cuda and Pontiac GTO pictured here are the work of Thomas Gion, who has faithfully recreated both cars in just 6-studs of width, capturing the styling cues of each brilliantly.

Today both brands are gone, but the legendary cars they created in the 1960s and ’70s mean they won’t be forgotten for some time yet.

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Black Sugar*

Lego Ford F100 V8

Another day, another Elf returns to TLCB Towers eagerly expecting a meal token and a Smartie. Today’s Elf is in luck, as it will get fed, but sadly as Smarties don’t come in black and there’s an unwritten rule about creation colours matching candy, it won’t receive the extra sugar hit. No matter, because Chris Radbone‘s custom ’50s Ford F100 pick-up hot rod looks the business in black. Opening doors, a dropping tailgate and a V8 engine all feature, and there’s more to see on Flickr via the link.

Lego Ford F100 V8

*Today’s most excellent title song.

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8880 Supercar Reloaded

Lego Technic 8880 Redux

LEGO’s 8880 Technic Supercar of 1994 is one of the brand’s most iconic and legendary sets. The largest model ever sold (at the time), 8880 featured all-wheel-drive, all-wheel-steering, all-wheel-suspension, a working gearbox, functioning steering, pop-up headlights, adjustable seats, and a V8 engine, becoming the blueprint (and inspiration) for probably every Technic Supercar MOC that this site has ever featured.

25 years after the original release, newcomer Hitchhiker has updated 8880 for the modern age, using the latest studless parts and building techniques, whilst retaining the dimensions, colour-scheme and functions of the original set.

Suggested to us by a reader, there’s more to see of Hitchhiker’s stunning 8880 Reloaded via ReBrickable, where a full gallery, video, and the all-important parts list and building instructions are available too. Click the link above to take a look.

Lego Technic 8880 Redux

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Put an LS in it

Lego Datsun 240Z LS-Swap

The internet’s answer to literally any engine-related question, ‘Put an LS in it‘ seems to be the default setting for most YouTube commenters, and – although it pains us to say it – not without good reason.

Compact, plentiful, powerful, and even available off-the-shelf new in ‘crate’ form, General Motors’ iconic V8 has been in use since 1996, powering everything in their line-up from sports cars to trucks.

The LS has since found its way into a myriad of other vehicles, often thanks to the fact that whilst the engine was good many of the cars in which it was originally fitted were complete crap, making it readily available for pocket-money in breakers yards.

Previous bloggee Simon Przepiorka has built a car that could be based on any number from the depths of YouTube, and it looks – well – awesome! Simon’s classic ’70s Datsun 240Z features a wide-arch kit, custom aero, and – of course – the obligatory LS V8-swap under the hood.

There’s much more to see of Simon’s transplanted 240Z on Flickr – click the link above to put an LS in it…

Lego Datsun 240Z LS-Swap

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The Road Warrior

Lego Mad Max V8 Interceptor

It’s been a while since the last Mad Max post here at TLCB, but today one of the Elves returned a hero and our smelly little workers are all now crowded around the old TV/VHS combo in their cage room watching Mel Gibson smash stuff up.

We have previous bloggee crash_cramer of Flickr to thank for the relative peace this has brought, and his huge 1:10 recreation of the V8 Interceptor from 1981’s Mad Max II – The Road Warrior.

Underneath the superbly accurate exterior is a working V8 (with supercharger), functioning steering and live axle suspension, courtesy of some custom curved lift-arms.

There’s more to see of crash-cramer’s epic build at his photostream, and if you’d like your own Mad Max Interceptor (albeit rather smaller) then check out the excellent custom kit from Manner-Spielzeug here.

Lego Mad Max V8 Interceptor

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