Tag Archives: 42100

My Other Car’s a Mining Excavator

With over 4,000 pieces, bluetooth remote control, and seven electric motors, LEGO’s enormous (and enormously expensive) Technic 42100 Liebherr R 9800 Excavator set is the largest yet produced by the company. If you’re going to make a ‘B-Model’, using just the parts from one official LEGO set, it may as well be from the biggest!

Previous bloggee and Technic genius Grohl has done just that, with his amazing 42100 snow groomer B-Model. With seven motorised functions including remote control drive and skid-steering, an elevating front blade, lowering groomy-thigumy on the back, plus a crane and winch, Grohl’s 42100 alternate is as functions-packed as the set from which it’s been built.

Grohl promises instructions are on the way if you fancy turning your own Liebherr excavator into a snow groomer yourself, and until then you can check out the build on Flickr via the link above.

We’re also looking for you to build your own B-Models from existing LEGO sets (whether that be from the enormous 42100 Liebherr R 9800 or the smallest City set) in TLCB’s Lock-Down B-Model Competition. You could even win yourself some brilliant bluetooth remote control prizes to bring your Lego creations to life! Check out the competition details by clicking here and get B-Modelling!

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

My Other Piece of Construction Equipment is a Liebherr Excavator

A slightly convoluted title there, but it’s due to the fact that this brilliant looking Bobcat skid-steer loader is a B-Model built entirely from the parts found within the enormous 42100 Technic Liebherr R 9800 Excavator set.

Built by previous bloggee Erik Trax, this remote control loader uses around two thirds of the pieces from the set including four Power Functions motors, which drive the tracks, bucket tilt, and arm lifting.

The arm lift is properly clever too, using a cunning double pivot to ensure the bucket raises through a vertical lift path. The Elf at the controls probably didn’t understand how this works, but nevertheless found it a very useful feature after driving a couple of its unfortunate colleagues towards the manky mop bucket in the corner of the corridor (used regularly in the clean-up of Elven bodily fluids).

With the vertical lift path ensuring none of its Elven cargo toppled out before it was ready, the Elf at the controls tilted the loader’s bucket over the damp receptacle below, whereupon its brethren thudded into it forlornly.

Pleased with its antics, the Elf then abandoned its find before its colleagues could climb out of the manky mop bucket and exact revenge, giving us a chance to explore Erik’s brilliantly engineered loader for ourselves.

Whilst we do that you can see more of Erik’s remote control skid-steer loader at his Flickr photostream and at the Eurobricks discussion forum, where a video of the Bobcat in action can also be found alongside a link to building instructions.

Click the links above to take a look whilst we see how easy it is to drop some Elves in the manky mop bucket…

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Honey, I shrunk the 42100

LEGO’s 42100 Technic Liebherr R 9800 is the largest Technic set ever produced. With over 4,100 pieces, seven electric motors, bluetooth control and a $450 price tag, we’re fairly sure that most MOCs will be quite a lot smaller than LEGO’s latest Goliath. Cyberdyne Systems hasn’t let that stifle his ambition though, building this tiny mechanical version of the mighty 42100 set and equipping it with all* the functionality of its much bigger brother.

The bucket arm can swing, raise and extend mechanically via linear actuators (and much finger twiddling we suspect), whilst the bucket itself can both tilt thanks to a worm gear and open by pulling on a string.

There’s more to see of Cyberdyne’s 42100-in-miniature at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above where you can also find a video of it in action.

*Kinda.

Tagged , , , , , ,

LEGO Technic 42100 Liebherr R 9800 Excavator | Set Preview

There’s been one hole remaining in our reveal of the H2 2019 LEGO Technic line-up. It turns out it was a very big hole indeed. This is the 42100 Liebherr R 9800 Excavator, the largest and most expensive Technic model ever released.

With over 4,100 pieces, seven electric motors, and two of LEGO’s new ‘Smart Hubs’ which allow for remote control via Bluetooth thanks to the recently released LEGO Control+ App, the 42100 set is the most advanced Technic set yet, and it has a price tag to match, costing $450/£400.

That is seriously expensive for a toy, but LEGO are hoping that the set’s enormous array of programmable functionality will make it an attractive purchase. The officially-licensed Liebherr (joining such sets as the Volvo L350F, Mack Anthem and Claas Xerion 5000) can drive, skid-steer, rotate the superstructure, extend and raise the boom, and open and tilt the bucket, all remotely via a phone.

Those functions can be programmed too, thanks to the new Control+ App, with realistic sound effects and real-time feedback available. It’s a modern interpretation of the brilliant plug-and-play 8479 Barcode Truck from twenty-two years ago, only with the up-to-date control programmability afforded by today’s intuitive touch devices.

The new LEGO Technic 42100 Liebherr R 9800 Excavator set will reach stores in October of this year, instantly becoming the flagship of the Technic range. Will the intuitive control, easy programmability and amazing multiple motorised functions offset that huge price? We’re willing to bet that if it does then a $500+ Technic set isn’t too far away…

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: