Tag Archives: V12

Rolled Gold

Let’s get the obvious bit out of the way. Those are not official LEGO wheels. But they are excellent. And the model riding atop them is even more so.

This spectacular Technic Lamborghini Countach LP500s is the work of Polo-Freak of Brickshelf, and it’s about as accurate a Lego Lamborghini as we’ve ever seen.

Polo’s incredible creation utilises Technic panels, System bricks, and those custom golden wheels to beautifully replicate the real ’80s supercar, including a brick-built replica of the Countach’s V12 engine and its signature scissor doors.

Over thirty high quality images can be found at Polo’s ‘Lamborghini Countach LP500S’ Brickshelf album and you can take a look at all of his rolled gold via the link above.

The Ferrari The Ferrari

Almost a decade on, the Ferrari LaFerrari is still the stupidest name ever given to a car. And yes, we have heard of the Mazda Bongo Friendee.

Powered by a 6.3 litre V12 with Hybrid KERS producing almost 1,000bhp, the Ferrari The Ferrari did have the performance to back up being named twice though.

This stunning 1:16 Model Team replica of the Ferrari The LaFerrari Ferrari is the work of previous bloggee Noah_L, and features opening butterfly doors, front trunk and engine cover, along with some of the finest presentation you’ll see anywhere in the online Lego community.

Noah has made building instructions available too, so you can recreate your own spectacular Ferrari LaFerrari The Ferrari model at home. Click on the link above to find the complete image gallery, along with build details and the link to building instructions.

Ferrari F50 GT | Picture Special

This is the Ferrari F50 GT, a GT1 racer designed to compete in the Global GT Series of the mid-’90s against supercars such the McLaren F1 GTR, Jaguar XJ220 and Porsche 911 GT1.

However, Ferrari being Ferrari, they were unhappy that homologation specials like the 911 GT1 were allowed to race, and so threw their hands in the air, shouted something Italian, and stormed off to continue monopolising Formula 1’s TV revenue.

Thus only three F50 GTs were built, none of which raced, and these days they’re probably worth a gagillion of any currency you care to pick. Fortunately this one is rather more attainable, being a (stunning) 1:10 scale Technic ‘Supercar’ replica.

Created by Jeroen Ottens, this beautifully presented build features all of the Technic Supercar requirements, including all-wheel suspension, functioning steering, a working V12 engine and four-speed sequential gearbox, plus opening doors and front and rear clamshells.

It’s a jaw-dropping model and there’s more to see at both Flickr and Eurobricks, where you can also find a link to building instructions so you can create Jeroen’s F50 GT for yourself. Just ensure you refuse to race it against a Porsche and shout a lot in Italian about things not being fair for the authentic Ferrari experience.

Rambo Lambo

The Urus is not Lamborghini’s first SUV. But it is their ugliest, which is something we suppose. No, back in the late 1980s, the maddest of all the car manufacturers decided to do something even madder than usual, and built a military-grade, V12 engined off-roader.

Nicknamed the ‘Rambo Lambo’ (younger readers, ask your parents), the LM002 featured the 5.2 litre engine from the Countach up front, although if you liked to literally burn money you could order the LM002 with Lamborghini’s 7.2 litre engine that had – up until that point – been reserved for Class 1 offshore powerboats.

A tubular frame with riveted aluminium panels, all wheel drive, 169 litre fuel tank, and specially developed Pirelli run-flat tyres designed specifically for use on hot sand where also included, which gives a clue as to who Lamborghini was pitching the LM002 at.

However even if you’e not an oil sheik, you can still own a Lamborghini LM002, courtesy of previous bloggee filsawgood and this spectacular fully RC Technic recreation.

Powered by four L Motors with Servo steering, filsawgood’s incredible Technic replica of Lamborgini’s wildest car can be controlled via bluetooth thanks to a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery, which can also up the power to the motors by a factor of eight versus LEGO’s own Power Functions battery.

All-wheel-drive with planetary hubs, independent suspension, opening doors and hood, a brilliantly detailed interior, and a V12 piston engine all feature, and there’s more to see of filsawgood’s astonishing Lamborghini LM002 on Flickr via the link above, where yes – a link to instructions can also be found!

Scuderia Stirling

What? A green Ferrari? Despite TLCB competition winner James Tillson’s previous form, this magnificent Technic Ferrari 250 GTO isn’t built in a  colour that would make the Tifosi throw things at their screens. Because Ferrari really did make a green one, and only one, for the late racing legend Sir Stirling Moss. Which makes it probably the coolest 250 GTO of them all.

Featuring an accurately replicated V12 engine linked to a five-speed gearbox, working steering and suspension, plus opening doors, hood and trunk, James’ Technic 250 GTO is a truly beautiful thing, and – unlike the real car – you don’t have to be Sir Stirling Moss to get your hands on one, as James has made building instructions available.

There’s more to see of this stunning creation at James’s photostream and on Eurobricks, where you can watch a video demonstrating the model’s features and find a link to the instructions so that you can build it for yourself.

Lamborghini Centenario | Picture Special

This amazing model is a 1:8 scale replica of Lamborghini’s ultra-limited Centenario hypercar, a V12-engined 760bhp celebration of what would have been their founder’s 100th birthday, sold by invitation only to just forty of the brand’s most discerning (read ‘wealthy’) customers.

Unless you’re one of those forty (let us know if you are!) you’ll probably never even see a Centenario, let alone drive one, but today we can offer you the chance to own one for yourself, as yup – this incredible recreation of Lamborghini’s exclusive hypercar can be built at home from standard LEGO pieces (although the model pictured here is enhanced with some 3D-printed rims and bespoke decals).

It comes from T Lego of Eurobricks, who has replicated not just the Centenario’s wild exterior but has also accurately recreated the engineering within too, and has released instructions so can can create your very own Centenario at home. We suspect this might take the total number built a bit above forty…

The bright blue exterior is superbly accurate and includes an opening hood and engine cover, opening scissor doors (controlled by a HOG mechanism), and a raising rear spoiler (also deployed via HOG).

Inside T Lego’s Centenario he’s created an accurate interior with a working steering wheel controlling the front wheels, and a working 7-speed sequential gearbox, controlled via the centre console. A V12 piston engine is turned via an all-wheel-drive system complete with three differentials, whilst all four wheels also feature clever pushrod inboard suspension, making the model every bit as technically advanced as the real car.

There’s much more of T Lego’s spectacular Technic Supercar to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above, where you can read full build details, view a video of the model’s features, and find a link to building instructions so you can build your very own.

Not Everything in the ’70s was Brown

Cars in the 1970s tended to look like this. Or this. Or this. Or this. And then the Lamborghini Countach came along, from space.

Launched in 1974 the world hadn’t seen anything like it, and the car instantly became a cult bedroom wall icon. It’s fortunate however, that most people know the Countach from a poster rather than from driving one, because they would probably be rather disappointed.

Why not stick to this then, Jerac‘s incredible Model Team replica of the 1970s icon. Jerac has captured the Countach’s wild shape to perfection and he’s even made instructions available so you can build your very own. Which means you can own a Countach for the looks without having to drive one, which really is what the car is all about.

Head to Jerac’s photostream via the link above to find of all his superb images plus a link to building instructions too.

Power Functions Pagani

This is a Pagani Zonda R, the grand finale of the car that put Pagani firmly on the map. This incredible fully remote controlled Technic replica of the iconic Italian hypercar comes from Tsui Carho of Eurobricks, who has recreated the Zonda R in astonishing detail. Twin XL motors drive the rear wheels, a Servo steers the fronts, there’s a V12 engine, pushrod suspension, working headlights, opening doors, and a removable engine cover. Head to Eurobricks via the link above for all the images and to join the discussion.

ZondaRRRR

The Pagani that sounds like it was named by pirates, the Zonda R was the Zonda’s finale; a track-only, fifteen-run special edition that was effectively a test-bed for what would become the Hyaura. You’re unlikely ever to even see an R, let alone drive one, so 3D supercarBricks has the next best thing in thus stunning brick-built replica. Now updated with a blog-worthy image there’s more to see at 3D’s ‘Pagani’ album on Flickr – take a look via the link above.

Lo lo lo lo Lola

A song about gender fluidity way ahead of its time, and also a seriously cool British race engineering firm that built pretty much everything from the 1960s all the way up to 2012, and whose remnants now form much of the Haas Formula 1 team. This was one of their later creations, the Lola-Aston Martin B09/60 LMP1 endurance racer from 2008.

This spectacular Technic recreation of the mad Le Mans prototype comes from Leviathan / Nico Lego of Flickr, and it’s a properly brilliant Technic Supercar. With a working V12 engine, double clutch gearbox, in-board pushrod suspension, working steering, and superb swooping bodywork it’s a model that’s well worth a closer look. Around thirty high-quality images are available to view at Leviathan’s Aston Martin Lola LMP1 Flickr album – click the link above to make the jump.

Lamborghini Centenario (II)

Following our last post here’s where Lamborghini’s V12 engine really lives. Built to celebrate 100 years since the birth of their founder, the Lamborghini Centenario is a 760bhp ultra-limited evolution of the Aventador, with just 20 coupes and 20 roadsters produced, each at an unbelievable price tag.

More attainable, but no less glorious to look at, is this stunning Model Team version by Lennart C of Flickr. Recreated beautifully with a complete interior, detailed engine, and the Lamborghini’s mad doors, there lot’s more to see at Lennart’s photostream. Join the celebration via the link above.

Lamborghini Centenario (I)

Lamborghini are best known these days for their wildly-styled V12-engined supercars, but they actually started in far more humble fashion as a tractor manufacturer. Flickr’s Yvan Bourdeau pays homage to their beginnings with this marvellous recreation of one of their earliest vehicles… yet has fitted it with one of Lamborghini’s enormous V12 engines. It’s almost as if he were a TLCB Elf… Head to Yvan’s photostream via the link above and see how quickly you can plow that field….

Purchase a Pagani

Lego Technic Pagani Huayra

This is a Pagani Huayra, one of the fastest, most aerodynamically clever, exclusive and expensive cars ever to reach production. Unobtainable then, but not this one. This is Jeroen Ottens’ incredible Technic recreation of the Pagani hypercar, and you could own it as the model is due to be auctioned for charity.

With working cantilever suspension, gull-wing doors, steering, an eight-speed sequential gearbox, highly detailed V12 engine, and even the Huayra’s active aerodynamics, Jeroen’s Technic Supercar is one of the most technically advanced yet. Just like the real car.

There are more images to see at Jeroen’s Pagani Huayra Flickr album by clicking here, where you can also find details on the charity action date and a link to the complete build specs.

Lego Technic Pagani Supercar

Ferrari 312 | Picture Special

Lego Ferrari 312 Grand Prix Racer

In the mid-1960’s Formula 1 was, perhaps surprisingly, nearly as restrictive technically as it is today. Engines had to be just 1.5 litres or less, which meant they were often comically smaller than those available to the general public. In 1965 the teams requested more power, and to their almost complete surprise the governing body responded by doubling the allowed engine capacity for 1966. We can’t image the FIA being that responsive today…

Lego Ferrari 312 Formula 1

The Three Litre era of Formula 1 was born as the existing teams scrabbled to take advantage of the new regulations. Ferrari were lucky, having a larger V12 engine available to them from their sports car racing programme, which they modified to keep within the maximum 3000cc allowed and shoved in the back of their F1 chassis. It was a bit of bodge-job though, being heavy and down on torque, and thus the resulting ‘312’ racer wasn’t a Championship winner, taking only three race wins from thirty-eight starts.

With limited success the 312 is sadly most famous for the tragedy that struck Lorenzo Bandini in the 1967 Monaco Grand Prix. On the 82nd lap Bandini caught the guardrail whilst entering the Marina and his car overturned, rupturing a fuel line as it did so. The shower of sparks ignited the car, and with the straw bales lining the track also catching fire Bandini was trapped in the inferno. Marshalls managed to pull him from the car, but he died in hospital a few days later.

Lego Ferrari 312 Formula 1

Ferrari continued to race the 312 with little success for several more years, with no money to develop a new car and the Cosworth DFV engine used by many other teams winning absolutely everything. Eventually Enzo Ferrari sold a stake of his business to FIAT, and in 1970 used the money to develop a new purpose-built flat-12 engine for Formula 1 racing, finally returning the team to a race winning position.

The 312 was quickly forgotten, but whilst it certainly wasn’t one of Ferrari’s more successful designs, it was – as you can see here – surely one of their most beautiful. The impeccable Model Team replica of the 312 shown in these images comes from Andre Pinto, who has captured every detail of the 312’s the suspension, interior, bodywork, and the (spectacular) V12 engine to create one of the finest classic Formula 1 cars ever built in Lego form.

There’s more to see of Andre’s beautifully photographed 1967 Ferrari 312 at both his Flickr album and at the Eurobricks discussion forum. Take a look via the links above, and if you’d like to hear what that slightly bodged 3.0 V12 sounds like, take a listen here.

Blackfish

Lego Nautilus Car

Today’s post features a car that is the exact opposite of everything in the staff car park. Extravagant, opulent, unnecessary even… Redfern1950s’ latest creation has more common with TLCB Executive Washroom and Sauna than with anything we’re driving.

It comes of course from the movie The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen which was, frankly, not very good. Not so the car, which was built for real in all of its twenty-two foot glory from the remnants of a Ford Cargo truck. It was so real in fact that it really drives, it’s road legal(ish), and a replica recently came up for auction on eBay, although our budget wouldn’t stretch to it.

Lego Nautilus Car

Redfern’s incredible Model Team recreation of Captain Nemo’s ‘Nautilus’ swaps the original white for black (looking a million times more sinister as a result!) and features opening doors and hood, under which is a suitably enormous V12 engine.

There’s a whole lot more to see of this amazing build at Redfern’s photostream – take a look via the link, plus you can see how the original UK-made movie car was built by clicking here and view the recently sold American replica by clicking here.

Lego Nautilus Car