Tag Archives: Yamaha

Dirt Danger

Is there a more dangerous vehicle than a quad bike? Of course there is, because back in the ’80s you could have one with a wheel missing.

The logic was probably of the bar-stool variety, in that three legs don’t wobble. However when an engine and rider are attached, and one of those legs moves about from side to side, wobbling, followed by crashing, was very much the order of the day.

Still, we would totally have a go, because the fear of tipping over and being pinned to the ground by a ferociously hot lump of clattering metal was half the fun!

Flickr’s Pat Lacroix is helping us reminisce, and you can see more of his superb ’80s ‘Dirt Trike’, complete with rear suspension, steering, and a chain driven engine via the link above. Just have a first aid box ready.

BNEEEEEEEEEEEEEERRRRRRRRR!

Gosh scramblers are annoying. They’re ridden around TLCB Towers by obnoxious teenagers at full throttle to maximise their irritating noise all the time, and with a top speed of 48mph it means they take a week to disappear from earshot. BNEEEEEEEEEEEERRRRRRRRRRRRRR!

Of course if we had a scrambler we’d ride it at full throttle to maximise its irritating noise all the time too, but that’s not the point. They’re bikes for knobs.

Much better is this, George Panteleon (aka ZetoVince)‘s superb Model Team replica of the Yamaha XT550, and not only is it much quieter than its infuriating real-world brethren, George has produced instructions so that you can create this ace motorcycle at home.

Click the link above to head to Flickr for the full gallery and to find that instructional link. BNEEEEEEEEEEEEEERRRRRRRRR!

Japan’s First Supercar

This is the Toyota 2000GT, Japan’s first supercar, and surely one of the most beautiful cars ever made. Produced from 1967 to 1970, the 2000GT was developed in collaboration with Yamaha, a relationship the two firms have maintained ever since. Only a few hundred units were built, including two special convertible versions for the James Bond movie ‘You Only Live Twice’, and the car was raced extensively, setting multiple speed and endurance records in the late 1960s.

Toyota 2000GTs command an enormous sum today, but thanks to Matthew Terentev you could still get your hands on one, as his stunning Technic version is currently on LEGO Ideas vying to become an official LEGO set. Matthew has recreated the GT’s incredible bodywork superbly too, with his model every bit as swoopily gorgeous as the real thing. Working steering, the coolest pop-up headlights on a car ever, and a detailed engine and interior also feature, and there’s more to see at Matthew’s ‘Toyota 2000GT’ album on Flickr here, where you can also find a link to vote for it on LEGO Ideas.

Dauphamaha

Lego Renault Dauphine Yamaha

Renault’s 1957 Dauphine was not a fast car. Powered by a 845cc inline-4 producing a meagre 32bhp, the Dauphine took 32 seconds to reach 60mph and topped out at just 8mph more. But it looked so pretty whilst doing it.

Described by motoring journalists at the time as “The prettiest four-seater in the world” the Dauphine was an enormous success, being manufactured in twelve different countries and selling over two million units in its 10 year production run – a huge figure for the 50s and 60s. And to be honest it wasn’t even that slow when compared to rivals of the time.

However by modern standards Renault’s little family car is almost dangerously lethargic. French tuner Adrien Faure thought so too, and decided his little Dauphine could do with a bit more power. Four times as much in fact, thanks to a 1200cc Yamaha motorbike engine that he’s fitted beautifully in place of the original ‘Ventoux’ unit.

It’s this car that serial bloggee Senator Chinchilla has chosen to recreate, complete with scraped paint and rust, with this lovely Model Team creation. There’s more to see of the Senator’s replica on Flickr by clicking here, and you can read more about the Yamaha-powered Dauphine on which his model is based visiting the Speedhunters website. It may no longer be all that pretty, but this Dauphine is quick!

Lego Renault Dauphine Yamaha

Hidenka!

Lego Yamaha Hidenka Motorcycle

This delightfully outrageous concept motorcycle is the work of one Flickr’s most inventive builders, the brilliant F@bz. Inspired by the ‘Ghost in the Shell’ movie, which is a feat in itself as the movie was one of the most uninspired we’ve seen in recent times, it’s called the Yamaha Hidenka, and there’s more to see at F@bz’ photostream via the link above.

Biker’s Paradise

Lego Technic Motorbikes

The Lego Car Blog Team own some interesting cars, as you’d probably expect from a website as nerdily automotive as this one, but no motorbikes. This is because if we owned motorcycles this blog would never have made it to five years old, and our organs would now belong to other people.

However despite our aversion to owning motorbikes, we do still rather like them, and fortunately newcomer Nesme Laurent (aka NEMOOZ) allows us to indulge in this passion from the safety of a comfy chair.

Laurent has built almost fifty Technic replica motorcycles, from manufacturers including BMW, Ducati, MV Agusta, Moto Guzzi, Honda, KTM, Yamaha, and Kawasaki, each features a variety of working functions, and instructions are available for many of the designs too.

You can see a selection of Laurent’s builds at his newly created MOCpage, and you can see the full back-catalogue of fifty or so bikes via Brickshelf.

Lego Technic Motorcycles

Death on Wheels

Lego Yamaha YFM 700 Quad Bike

Today’s news is full of the story of America dropping its largest ever non-nuclear bomb on some unsuspecting militants in Afghanistan. Weighing 9,800kgs and at over 3oft in length, the GBU-43/B Massive Ordnance Air Blast Bomb sure is a devastatingly deadly bit of kit. But we suspect it’s not half as deadly as this, Yamaha’s YFM 700 quad bike.

Designed to roll over on top of you if you so much as look at it, the YFM 700 is the sort of machine that is way, way too fast for almost everyone that will ever climb atop it. But it sure is a cool way to go. This Lego recreation of the lethal Yamaha comes from Flickr’s André Pinto, and thankfully it’s much safer than its full size counterpart. See more at André’s photostream via the link above.

Balloon Bike II

Lego Yamaha Spectrum

You wait ages for a hot-air-balloon motorbike, and then two come along at once! Today’s second cunning use of LEGO’s balloon pieces comes from Flickr’s F@bz, and you can see more of his Yamaha Spectrum motorcycle concept at the link above.