Tag Archives: boat

A Pirate’s Life for Me

Today’s creation is not a car, which means we’re well out of our depth. But, despite not knowing which way the wind is blowing, even we can see just how swell this magnificent 72-gun pirate galleon by Flickr’s Robert4168/Garmadon is.

To parrot a few stats from Robert, the ‘Buccaneer’s Dread’ measures 165 studs from rudder to bowsprit, 58 studs crossbeam, 170 studs tall, is crewed by 36 mini-figures (including obligatory skeletons), and features over 85 LED lights from third-party specialists Lightailing.

Robert’s voyage to complete the ‘Buccaneer’s Dread’ took three years, and the finished model is now up for sale, with much more of this piratical masterpiece available to view at his photostream. Sea dogs, buccaneers, freebooters, hearties and swashbucklers set sail via the link above!

*One hundred doubloons if you can spy all the piratical puns.

Das Boot

15,000 pieces, 4½ years, and 1.8 metres. A few of the astonishing statistics associated with Ciamosław Ciamek‘s breathtaking 1:38 scale Second World War U-Boat.

Constructed in six sections, each with a removable sides to reveal the spectacular detail within, Ciamosław’s incredible mini-figure scale replica of a German ‘Typ VII C U-Boot’ accurately recreates the control room, front and rear messes, bow, engine rooms, and stern, all of which were designed digitally before being built from thousands of LEGO pieces.

A crew of dozens of mini-figures are shown throughout the interior of the boat, many operating the equipment, engines, and weaponry, whilst others are off-shift in the mess.

It’s a jaw-dropping creation, with hundreds of images across two albums required to capture the model’s scale and complexity, and you can check out the first of these on Flickr via the link in the text above. Click it, sit back, and take in the most amazing World War 2 creation you’re likely to see in 2022…

Barracuda Redux

The 6285 Black Seas Barracuda is probably one of the greatest LEGO sets ever released. Launched back in 1989 with just under a thousand pieces, 6285 is a high watermark for LEGO’s Pirates range that the company is yet to better. But that hasn’t stopped SuperSick.

Loosely based on the original set, SuperSick’s Black Seas Barracuda Redux adds a host of smooth techniques and piece upgrades, plus an additional twelve cannons, to create very possibly our favourite pirate ship ever. In fact, apart from the flags flying in the wrong direction (sailing basics SuperSick!), it could be the perfect ship.

Join the piratical adventure at the Eurobricks forum via the link above.

Sundance


TLCB’s luxury yacht, paid for by the riches that blogging Lego brings, doesn’t get mentioned much here. We like our privacy, and it’s hard enough keeping the multitude of attractive girls away as it is, without them knowing about the boat.

Ted Andes has no such qualms however, uploading this rather wonderful Technic yacht ‘Sundancer’ to Flickr.

A mini-figure cabin, keel, rudder, plus marvellous fabric sails fashioned from the LEGO Carousel set’s canopy create a boat very nearly as beautiful as TLCB’s, and you’re welcome on board via the link above. Ted’s of course, not ours.

*Today’s excellent title song.

Coaster Noordborg

This is the Noordborg, a 49 metre coaster built for the Dutch shipping company Wagenborg in the 1960s. Well, this one isn’t, being 1.25 metres long and built by Eurobricks’ Jebbo, but it’s every bit as wonderful as the real thing.

1:40 scale makes Jebbo’s coaster approximately mini-figure scale, with it requiring 26,000 LEGO pieces to create.

Spectacular detail is everywhere, and there’s more to see of Jebbo’s beautiful brick-built boat at the Eurobricks discussion forum. Click here to climb aboard.

Kirov Your Enemies Close

This is a Kirov-Class Cruiser, built between 1933 and 1944 for the Soviet Union and deployed on the Black Sea during the Second World War.

The largest ships operated by the Soviet Navy post the Russian Civil War, the Kirov-Class ships featured technology from a variety of nations, with the design being Italian, the radar systems American and British, the boilers British, and the aircraft catapults German.

All of which were countries that the Soviet Union was either at war with or directly hostile to during the time the Kirov-Class ships were in service. It’s a funny world.

This spectacular recreation of a Kirov-Class Cruiser comes from Kirill Simerzin of Flickr, who has replicated the real ship beautifully, from the Italian propeller on the bottom to the American radar systems at the top.

There’s more of the build to see at Kirill’s photostream – click the link above to keep your enemies close…

Speed Kills

And so do cigarettes.

This is the Cigarette One 515, an unfeasibly enormous AMG-powered speedboat built by the Cigarette boat company, whose story is rather fantastic. Or rather, the story of their designer is…

Donald Aronow was born in Brooklyn to a Russian-Jewish immigrant family in 1927. After working overseas during the Second World War, Aronow returned to the U.S and started a construction firm during the boom of the 1950s. A few years later, aged just 32, Aronow was a millionaire, and moved to Miami where he began racing boats for fun.

Over the next decade, and after winning two Powerboat World Championships, racing boats had become a business, with Aronow selling his race-winning Cigarette powerboat designs to the super-rich, politicians, and crime bosses alike. We suspect some were all three.

The speed of Aronow’s boats meant they became a popular choice for Miami’s cocaine smugglers, and the U.S Customs Service who aimed to catch them (via a deal brokered by Vice President George H.W Bush, who was a Cigarette customer himself).

This choice of customer eventually became Aronow’s undoing, and he was shot dead in 1987 by fellow-boat racer turned racing-company owner Ben Kramer and an accomplice, after a business deal turned sour. That Kramer was already a drug smuggler himself (despite winning the American Offshore Powerboat Championship only the year before) perhaps should’ve been a red flag.

The Cigarette Company continued after Aronow’s murder however, and this awesome looking Lego recreation of the One 515 shows their boats are as mad today as ever. It comes from previous bloggee Drop Shop, who has packed it with details and brilliant building techniques to accurately capture the insanity of the real thing, and there’s lots more of the build to see at Drop Shop’s ‘Sinister Cigarette’ album on Flickr.

Finally, if you think all of the above would make for an amazing movie, you’re right. Unfortunately we got a terrible one. Still, you can check out the ‘Speed Kills’ trailer here, as the post’s title hinges on it!

HMS Texas

This is ‘HMS Redoubtable’, an Imperial Guard ship by Flickr’s Elephant-Knight, and it has absolutely definitely got more guns than you. Even if you live in Texas.

Despite Texas having the highest number of guns (and the highest number of gun deaths – go-figure?), even a Texan is unlikely to match Redoubtable’s three gun decks and one hundred and twelve separate guns. That’s even more weaponry than is carried at an average ‘MAGA’ rally.

At over fifty inches long (that’s over 160 studs) and nearly forty inches tall, Elephant’s ship is impressive in far more ways than just than its gun tally, and there’s a whole lot more to see of this spectacular ship eleven-months-in-the-making at Elephant-Knight’s photostream.

Join the one hundred and twelve gun salute via the link above.

Not a Car

But we rather like boats. They fetch tasty things out of the sea, take us to exotic places, and bring us pretty much everything from where it’s made to where it needs to be.

This one is a research vessel, itself the noblest of purposes, Luis Pena is the builder, and there’s more to see on Flickr. Click the link above to take a look.

Not a Carrrrgh!

Aarrrgh, this be a fine vessel. She be a twenty-four gun barque, plain to the eye yet a beauty where it counts, from her Harrrry Potter wand rigging to her 12-pounderrr cannons. She be captained by Sebeus I and you can request to join her crew on Flickrrrr.

Canal Blockage

We don’t often feature micro-scale creations here at TLCB, let alone whatever scale this is. Micro-micro-micro-scale?

This is the Ever Given container ship, here measuring just six studs in length, the life-size version of which is currently blocking the Suez Canal.

At 400m (1,300ft) long, the Ever Given is one of the largest ships in the world, able to carry over 20,000 shipping containers. These are all currently wedged between the banks of the Suez – blocking the hundreds of other ships that were transiting the canal at the time – and creating the world’s largest homage to Austin Powers in a baggage cart.

Whilst the Egyptian authorities attempt to clear their canal blockage you can check out this micro-micro-micro-scale version courtesy of yu chris‘ on Flickr, plus you can read a bit more about why the Suez Canal is so important here.

Dutch Rudder

Rolling coal‘ is for idiots. Aside from blasting a load of carcinogenic particulates into the air as some sort of moronic ‘anti-environment’ protest, plumes of black smoke actually signify wasted fuel, ergo less power. Which is why we don’t use steam engines any more.

That said, we do still like a good steam engine (which is possibly the saddest sentence in the English language), and so too does TLCB debutant Jebbo, who has built three unfathomably beautiful Dutch steam tugs from our favourite plastic bricks.

Each model is an exquisitely detailed replica of a real steam tug boat, of which two are apparently still running on coal.

Amazing attention to detail and ingenious building techniques are in abundance and there’s more to see of Jebbo’s ‘Furie’, ‘Hercules’, and ‘Noordzee’ steam tug boats at the Eurobricks discussion forum. Click the link above to roll coal the right way.

Escape to Sea

OK, this is clearly not a car, but this TLCB Writer is doing anything he can to avoid the Harry & Meghan Oprah Interview (aka ‘Posh Jerry Springer’), which is everywhere as he types this. And thus, here’s a boat.

It’s a rather lovely boat too, being an Intrepid 375 by previous bloggee Edwin Korstanje, and featuring a fiendishly complicated brick-built hull, a pair of Yamaha outboards, and some rather neat custom decals.

There’s more of Edwin’s creation to see at the Eurobricks forum, which has got to be more worthwhile than watching two of the world’s most privileged persons badmouthing their own family on international television. Join us in escaping to the sea via the link above.

Chumdinger

This gloriously grey steamer comes from Daniel Church of Flickr, whose ‘Chumdinger’ steampunk tugboat plies the dirty waters of a Victorian Thames. And what waters they are too, with Daniel creating the bow waves and paddle churn absolutely beautifully in trans tiles. That’s not a very ‘TLCB’ thing to write, as we’re normally focussed on engines and whatnot, but fortunately the Chumdinger has one of those too, with the pistons pumping and paddle turning brilliantly via a hidden Power Function motor. There’s more to see of Daniel’s superb creation at his photostream – click the link above to head to the past on London’s river.

My Other Car’s a Boat

LEGO’s 42093 Chevrolet Corvette set spawned several B-Model entries into our 2020 Lock-Down B-Model Competition, including off-roaders, sports cars, and even a Formula-E racing car. This is Grohl’s 42093 alternate, and he’s decided to create something altogether more buoyant.

The Corvette’s body panels have been repurposed into a rather neat looking speedboat hull, inside which is a V8 engine turned by hidden wheels, which drives the rear propeller. Said propellor is also synchronised with the rudder and concealed steering front wheel, so they all work beautifully as the model is pushed across the floor. You can see how it works on YouTube here, and you see further imagery – plus a link to building instructions – at Grohl’s photostream by clicking here.