Tag Archives: boat

Not a Car…

Lego Galleon

…but we rather like ships and we have control of TLCB keyboard. This beautiful 22-gun light frigate comes from previous bloggee and shipbuilding master Sebeus I. Built entirely from Lego, save for the rigging and sails, and with a wonderfully detailed mini-figure scale interior, Sebeus’s ‘Raging Fire’ galleon is definitely worth a closer look, even if you’re only here for the cars. You can see the full gallery of images via both MOCpages and Flickr – click the links to climb aboard.

Lego Galleon

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Technic 42064 Ocean Explorer | Review

LEGO Technic 42064 Ocean Explorer Review

It’s review time here at The Lego Car Blog, as the first of 2017’s Technic sets is placed under the microscope. Reader and previous bloggee Nils O has got his hands on the new 42064 Ocean Explorer set, and he joins us here at TLCB Towers to let you know whether you should get your hands on it too. Over to Nils…

Worth a second look?

OK, this isn’t a car, but it’s Lego Technic and it’s a vehicle. So, who cares…? When I saw TLCB’s preview for the first 2017 Technic sets I was a little disappointed by the picture of the 42064 Ocean Explorer. It was already written in the blogpost that the model looked more like a City set than like a Technic model, and there weren’t many Technic functions visible on the photos.

Despite this, I really liked the look of the ship, so I thought that I’d give it a second look when the set became available in stores. When I finally saw the set I was pleasantly surprised; it really had enough functions to wear that Technic logo on the box. So I made a wish for my birthday and now I’ve got it!

Ok, so what do we get? We get quite a big ship with a clean, studless, almost LEGO City like look. We also get a small submarine and a small helicopter. Each of the three models has one or more Technic functions. The scale is more or less in line with LEGO City, so if you like you can use a crew of mini-figures with it.

First of all there is the ship, a big explorer vessel of the type you would expect to search for a sunken ship or to explore the deep sea fauna. There are three ‘hidden’ functions operated by ‘HOG’ gears on top of of the ship’s bridge. The first function is the steering of the ship. The model has four little wheels for smooth movement on the floor. The rear wheels have a steering function operated by the bigger gear mounted in the centre of the bridge. The steering is also connected to two steering rudders on the rear end of the vessel. The second and third function are for the operation of the crane. The crane can be rotated and lifted by turning the two smaller gears on the left and right side of the bridge. It works perfectly to drop the submarine into the ‘water’ and get it back on board.

The second model is a little deep sea submarine. It’s quite small, but it has two Technic functions built inside. One gear is connected to the rear propellers, so when you turn it, they turn too, whilst the second gear is connected to a mechanism that opens and closes the pair of robot arms like a pair of pliers. With a little practice you can grab ‘specimens’ and bring them back to the vessel.

The third model is a small helicopter. Even though it’s smaller in size than most LEGO City helicopters it has the typical Technic helicopter function of both rotors being connected to an ‘operation gear’ outside the model, allowing them to spin simultaneously. Both smaller models – the submarine and the helicopter – have a canopy big enough to carry a mini-figure, and by adding one or more ‘half pins with a stud’ you can even fix the figures inside.

So, after all, the 42064 Ocean Explorer is really worth a second look, and for me it really was worth buying it. My son loves it, too. For him it’s like his LEGO City models, just better. I think it could also be cool to see all the functions of the vessel motorised with Power Functions elements (hmm, I think I see a new project appearing on the horizon…).

Thanks to Nils O for joining us as a Guest Reviewer to add another set to the Set Review Library. If you’d like to write a set review as Nils has you can; simply get in touch with us via the usual channels.

LEGO Technic 42064 Ocean Explorer Review
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Floating Bricks 2017 | Hamburg – Reader Report

Lego Konajra Kustwacht + Pump Dredger

TLCB staff don’t often get out to LEGO shows. Partly because our mysterious identities may be revealed, but mostly because the Elves have a habit of sneaking into our luggage, and our insurance is nowhere near that comprehensive.

Luckily our readers can be more mobile than us, and one such reader contacted us with an offer to cover a LEGO event. Over to today’s Guest Blogger, Jan Mueller…

On the 18th and 19th of March 2017 the exhibition “Floating Bricks – The maritime World of LEGO Bricks“ was held in Hamburg. It took place, appropriately, at a retired ferry terminal in the Altona district of the city.

Up to 1863, Altona was a harbour town which belonged to Denmark, and the Danish influence is partly still present until today. That weekend there were a lot of ships in town, made of Danish LEGO elements.

The fair was organized by the city event guide Hamburg-Führer and powered by the North-German RLUG Stein Hanse (recognized LEGO User Group). The Stein Hanse has organised several well-received exhibitions before and this was their first one in Hamburg. Members of the Stein Hanse had built a detailed oil platform, part of the Hamburg Airport, the Hamburg tube (which mostly goes overground) and many other models, which were put on display for the two-day event.

Lego Floating Bricks Hamburg 2017

The RLUG, founded by Martin and Lutz in 2013 has more than 150 LEGO fans as members. One of the invited exhibitors was Brynjar Karl with his 6.5m model of the Titanic to Hamburg. The LEGO Titanic was on its way to New York, but was damaged on the way. Not kidding! Now the Titanic was undergoing some dock-time for repairs in Altona and Brynjar Karl was on-site for live building, supported by some of the other builders present at the show.

Two further additional LEGO artists were also invited: Arjen Oude Kotte (aka Konajra) and Edwin Korstanje from the Netherlands, who are both specialised in large highly detailed ship models.

The location of the exhibition, the old ferry terminal, offered a wonderful view of the Hamburg harbour with its container vessels and cruise ships and made it the perfect place to present maritime LEGO models. There was a fine collection of food trucks present to cater for the 6,000+ visitors, and the attendees also had the chance to build a huge mosaic of Hamburg’s newest landmark: the Elbphilharmonie, a new concert house on the river Elbe.

Many thanks to Jan for joining us here at TLCB with his summary of the Floating Bricks exhibition in Hamburg! If you’d like to report on a LEGO event as Jan has then we’d love to hear from you – simply get in touch via the usual channels and your words and pictures could appear here too.

Lego Terminal at the Evening courtesy of Hamburg-Führer

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Submarover

Lego Submarover

We thought that Febrovery had every possible base covered by now, but Flickr’s Galaktek has managed to find a roving niche as yet unfilled. And now we think about it, it’s an obvious one too. Any planet worth inhabiting must have water, but until now the liquid surface of space has been completely ignored by the rover designers of the internet. However, with niftily retractable wheels and a suite of propellors, Galaktek‘s Beatles-esque ‘Submarover’ can explore the oceans and land in equal measure, all whilst singing an irritating tune. Set sail via the link above.

Lego Submarover

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Brick Built Boats

Lego Yachts

No these aren’t cars, but they are wonderful. Plus we like boats, and we’re the ones with access to TLCB Keyboard. Anyhoo, these two beautiful yachts complete with superb brick-built hulls and fully tuneable rigging come from Flickr’s Felipe Avelar, and each is a masterclass in fine detailing. There are more brilliant images available to view at Felipe’s photostream – click the link above to set sail.

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Not a Car

Lego Ship

It’s 2017! And we’re kicking off the new year with a creation that, er… isn’t a car. No matter, it is lovely. This medieval warship has been constructed by Felipe Avelar, it’s crewed by a rag-tag band of mini-figures, and there’s more to see on Flickr here.

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Not a Car

Lego Ship

…but a brilliant build nonetheless, Robert4186‘s beautiful mini-figure scale wooden ship is packed with stunning details. There more to see, including some cunningly photoshopped images with real-world backgrounds, on Flickr. Click the link above to set sail.

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Catching Clouds

Lego Flying Boat

Today’s post is not a car. Or even a boat. Or an aircraft. In fact we’re not really sure what it is, but we know we like it. The delightfully strange Dwalin Forkbeard is behind this floating weirdness and you can see more at his wilfully odd photostream here.

Lego Flying Boat

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Biggie Smalls

Lego Nieuw Statendam Cruise Ship

Micro-scale creations are usually pretty, well… micro. Not this one though. Measuring a massive 1.5 meters long, built from around 25,000 LEGO bricks, and weighing 23KGs, Edwin Kornstanje’s 1:200 replica of Holland America Line’s Nieuw Statendam cruise ship is one of the largest fan-built models we’ve ever featured.

Decks feature full interiors, with bars, restaurants, lounge rooms, a spa, a casino, and two swimming pools, all of which have been recreated beautifully in miniature. The real ship is currently being constructed in Italy and is due to launch in 2018, but Edwin’s magnificent replica is ready to sail now. Book your ticket to see all of the incredible details at Flickr or Eurobricks, and you can read more about the builder in Series 1 of our Master MOCers interviews by clicking here.

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The Eternal Wanderer

flying-dutchman

The Flying Dutchman is a ship that has been condemned to wander the oceans for all eternity. It’s origins lie centuries ago and it has been celebrated in plays, films and operas. Now it has been created in Lego bricks too.

This particular version has been built by W. Navarre on Flickr. The hull looks just as worn and battered as wooden ship should look like after years at sea.  It also features a nice balcony for the captain at the stern.  Click the link in the text to see the ragged, brick-built sails in more detail and hope this never crosses your bows.

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Shiptember

Lego Privateer Oliver Cromwell ship

It’s Shiptember, one of the online Lego Community’s many tenuously-titled bandwagons, and we’re jumping aboard! This gorgeous build is a 3ft long mini-figure scale replica of the 1776 ten-gun privateer ‘Oliver Cromwell’. It’s been built by  redmondej of Flickr aka Fred Miracle of MOCpages, and there lots more to see at his photostream and MOCpage. There’s may be a chance that we’ve misunderstood ‘Shiptember’…

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Sky Shed

Lego Airship

This glorious contraption is apparently a Cargo SkyBoat, and it’s utterly wonderful in every single way. Not knowing anything about Cargo SkyBoats, and having pinched this from Bricknerd, we’ll leave it there, but you can see lots more courtesy of Alexis Dos Santos on Flickr. Click on these words to get airborne.

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Am I Pleased to See You…

Lego Ford Bronco 4x4

Or did I just put a canoe in my pocket! Sorry about that, we’re feeling a bit weird today. No matter, this 1970s Ford Bronco, complete with roof mounted canoe, looks just the thing for a weekend in the bush. And look at how much wood it’s got! Lino Martins is the builder behind it and there’s more to see at his photostream – click here to get wet and dirty.

Lego Model Team Ford Bronco

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Tiny Lego Wonders – Book Review

Tiny Lego Wonders Review

‘Where can I get instructions / How do I build it?’. It’s the single most frequently asked question that we receive here at TLCB – so just how do you start ‘MOCing’?

It’s a question we raised in our review of the superb No Starch Press produced ‘Art of Lego Scale Modeling‘ book last year, and one that, since LEGO discontinued their brilliant Ideas Books, has gone unanswered. Now though, No Starch Press have created a book aimed squarely at fulfilling this need.

Tiny Lego Wonders, written by LEGO-Ambassador Mattia Zamboni, features 200 pages of clear instructions for 40 wonderfully realistic miniature vehicles, from cars to buses via trains, aircraft, construction equipment and more. The book is divided into sections that categorise these models according to where you might find them in the real world, for example the airport, the harbour, and the construction site.

Each location section features a double-page spread showing all of the vehicles within it in a large brick-built scene. It’s a simple yet brilliant addition that’s very reminiscent of LEGO’s old annual catalogues and it’s sure to provide a huge amount of inspiration.

Lego Instructions Book

Every set of instructions starts with a high quality image of the finished model, just as any official LEGO set does, along with a parts list and a difficulty level. The instructions themselves are beautifully clear and the build process will be familiar to anyone who has constructed an official LEGO set.

There are perhaps slightly fewer steps and marginally more complicated sub-assemblies than you’ll find in LEGO’s own work, but if anything LEGO have over-simplified their instructions in recent times and Tiny Lego Wonders seems to have struck a good balance between conciseness and difficulty.

Lego TGV Train Instructions

Where Tiny Lego Wonders scores huge points is with its inspiration potential. All of the models featured use common non-specialist parts, but even so it’s unlikely that most builders will have the exact part and colour combinations to recreate the model piece-for-piece as per the instructions. However the instructions are so good, and the models so thoughtfully designed, that changing the colours or design slightly is really easy. And once you’ve done that, you’ve started MOCing!

Some sections also include images of additional variations of the model detailed in the instructions, showing what can be done with a few simple changes. Again, these are really easy to replicate (even though they aren’t included in the instructions) and having a go yourself will instantly turn you into a ‘MOCer’.

Lego Car Instructions

Are there any disappointments? Nope, not really. Perhaps a few of the large double-page scenes look a little over-polished / too digitalised to these eyes, but other than that Tiny Lego Wonders might be the perfect MOCer’s book. Which gives us a bit of a dilemma in giving a rating because, despite the general ineptitude in TLCB office, there are some talented builders here who would have limited use for such a book. However, Tiny Lego Wonders isn’t aimed at the microscopic demographic of ‘Lego Blogger’, and thus we can ignore our usage and rate it accordingly;

Tiny Lego Wonders

Buy this book! Even at just £13 / $17 for the hardcover on Amazon, Tiny Lego Wonders is as beautifully produced as all No Starch Press publications, but for it to remain pristine on a bookshelf or coffee table would be a great shame. Tiny Lego Wonders needs to look dog-eared, shabby and worn out, because the value of this book is in its use; Tiny Lego Wonders could be the launchpad you need to start your MOCing journey.

From now on when anyone asks us ‘How do I build it?’ we’re going to give the same answer; You start here.

✮✮✮✮✮

No Starch Press

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You’re on a Boat…

Lego Boat

…with the man your man could smell like. It’s a bloody big boat too, as this incredible sailing ship by Flickr’s Know Your Pieces is at least three times bigger than you think it’s going to be. Just like your Mom. There’s more to see on Flickr – click the link above to cast off.

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