Tag Archives: quattro

Wings (Part II)

Lego Audi Sport quattro S1 E2 Pikes Peak

Unlike today’s other wingsy post, the aero attached to this amazing-looking Audi quattro S1 E2 Pikes Peak is entirely functional. Built for conquering the formidable Pikes Peak mountain climb back when the surface was loose gravel, the Audi quattro S1 E2 needed as much downforce as it could get. Piloted by WRC legend Walter Röhrl, the S1 E2 reached the top of the mountain in less than eleven minutes, making it the first car ever to do so.

This wonderful replica of one of the most ridiculous racing cars ever built comes from Marc ‘Edge’ R.unde of Flickr, and he’s captured both the remarkable bodywork of the S1 E2 and the famous Audi Sport livery beautifully. See more at the link above.

Lego Audi Sport quattro S1 E2 Pikes Peak

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Race on Sunday Sell on Monday

Lego Audi Sport quattro S1 E2

Contrary to popular belief Audi were not the first to bring all-wheel-drive to performance cars. However their ‘quattro’ system undoubtedly brought all-wheel-drive performance into the mainstream, and it changed rallying forever.

Launched in 1980 the Audi quattro brought several innovative new technologies into one glorious package, including all-wheel-drive, turbocharging, and a delightfully weird inline 5-cylinder engine. Audi entered their new car in the World Rally Championship’s Group B category, winning the championship in 1982 and 1984, plus the Pike’s Peak Hillclimb too.

By 1985 a variety of all-wheel-drive turbocharged rivals had caught – and then overtaken – the rally pioneer, beating Audi at their own game. This led Audi Sport to chop a chunk of length from the quattro’s wheelbase and up power to a very unofficial 500bhp+. The Sport quattro was born, a comedically ugly machine that was devastating effective. Best of all due to the FIA’s homologation rules a few hundred Sport quattros had to be produced for the road, meaning you could buy your very own World Rally Car for trips to Walmart.

Suggested by a reader we have both the rally and road versions of the Sport quattro in today’s post, each brilliantly built in Speed Champions scale by previous bloggee Marc ‘Edge’. There’s more to see of Marc’s rally and road Sport quattros on Flickr – click the links above to head to a gravelly forest circa-1985.

Lego Audi Sport quattro

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e-Tron

Lego Audi R18 e-tron quattro

Audi didn’t win last year’s Le Mans (the first time in years they weren’t on the top step), but only because sister company Porsche took the honours. They’ll be looking for a win this year though to distract the motoring press from that unfortunate fraudulent emissions business. This small-scale replica of Audi’s R18 e-Tron quattro comes from RGB900 of Flickr, and it’s a remarkably accurate recreation. See more via the link above.

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All Four

Lego Audi S1 Quattro Rally Car

A modern Audi might just be an overpriced Skoda driven by a sunglasses-wearing, tail-gating douchebag, but there was a time when to drive an Audi was the understated choice.

All that changed in the 1980s though, when the Ingolstadt firm decided to pair a revolutionary all-wheel-drive system with a brilliant turbocharged five-cylinder engine. Audi weren’t actually the first manufacturer to insert all-wheel-drive into a production performance car (that title goes to Jensen and their fantastic FF), but they were the first to do it for the masses(ish).

Audi entered their new car into the World Rally Championship’s recently formed ‘Group B’ category, winning two world championships and rendering all two-wheel-drive competitors obsolete overnight. No car without all-wheel-drive has ever won the championship since.

The Technic replica of that championship-winning Audi S1 quattro pictured here comes from Eurobricks’ dokludi, and it’s as brutally ugly as the real thing. It’s accurate on the inside too, with working steering, all-wheel-drive, gearbox, inline five-cylinder engine, suspension and a full roll cage.

You can see all the images and read full details of the build at the Eurobricks discussion forum – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Technic Audi Quattro

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Red in the Rearview

Lego Mad Max 2 Road Warrior

There are a few vehicles that you don’t want to see looming in your rearview mirror. If you’re Mad Max, the first of today’s two creations is one of them; the lead chase car in Mad Max 2 ‘The Road Warrior’.

As it turns out, it doesn’t end well for the pink-mowhawked maniac riding in the convertible truck, but Max doesn’t fare much better either. This excellent mini-figure version of the car from the 1981 movie comes from TLCB regular _Tiler, and there’s more to see at his Flickr Photostream.

Today’s second creation is a from a brand that we’re all used to seeing in our rearview mirror, two feet from our rear bumper, being driven by a sunglasses-wearing douchebag who really must get to that next meeting asap.

Yes, Audi have become the manufacturer of choice for tailgating muppets everywhere, but there was a time when Audi’s class of driver was altogether different. Coincidentally it was back in the ’80s when Max was being terrorised by the vehicle above, and Audi stood for understated excellence.

It was the car below that really put the brand on the map, and – unfortunately – went a long way in adding Audi to the buying lists of the aforementioned clientele. It is of course the legendary early ’80s quattro with a small ‘q’. This neat Lego version has been built by Ben, and is available to view on Flickr.

Lego Audi quattro

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Ashes to Ashes

Lego Audi Quattro

Audi’s original quattro (without a capital letter) is currently seeing something of a resurgence in popularity thanks to a starring role in the hit BBC show ‘Ashes to Ashes’. However for those in the know the ’80s coupe has been a legend for 30 years.

Built back when Audi was a quiet, understated*, and slightly boring manufacturer of grey saloons the quattro came from nowhere to take the rally world by storm, and in doing so changing the sport forever. No two-wheel drive car would ever win the World Rally Championship again.

The quattro wasn’t actually the first all-wheel-drive production car (although Audi like to make us think it is), that honour goes to the Jensen FF, but it is probably the car that brought the virtues of four-driven-wheels to the masses. Now almost every manufacturer can count an all-wheel-drive model in their range.

This excellent recreation of Audi’s icon is the work of Flickr’s Ralph Savelsberg, and you can see more of his Ashes to Ashes spec quattro here.

*Imagine that!

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Group B

Lego Group B Rally Cars Audi Lancia

After nailing* a sci-fi post yesterday we’re back to what we know; cars. These two will be instantly recognisable to many of you, they are of course the legendary Audi Quattro S2 and Lancia Delta S4 from the monstrous Group B era of the World Rally Championship. Flickr’s Dario Minisini is the builder, and you can see more of his recreations of the fastest and most dangerous racing cars ever built at his photostream.

Lego Classic Rally

*Er… yeah. Space.

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The Rally King

The rally king

Interesting photography, isn’t it? We think so.

Most petrolheads know the Audi S1 Quattro: it’s one of the rally legends. This sleek looking 4-wide version by Starscream Soundwave does fulfil the expectations of a rally machine. Check SS’ work out by clicking on the link, and see the original Nils O’s version that inspired it here.

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Vorsprung Durch Technik

Audi Quattro S1

Not pretty, but very clever

Another classic car from an axis power today; the stupendous Audi quattro Sport. Long before Audi became the preserve of outside-lane tailgating, bluetooth headset wearing cocks, they were a relatively niche manufacturer of dull saloon cars. Then they took a British idea (Google ‘Jensen FF’), applied it to their new coupe, took it rallying, and changed the automotive world.

Maks‘ Lego version is one of the last rally quattros, raced during the insane Group B era with a chunk cut out of the wheelbase to keep it competitive against a slew of new 4×4 rivals. View it and Maks’ other work on Flickr.

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