Tag Archives: car

Not A Car

Well, actually, yes it is a car. Confusingly, most people in TLCB’s home country call kayaks “canoes” and canoes “kayaks”. Even more confusingly, this kayak is actually a car. Yet more perplexingly, this combination of boat and car isn’t amphibious. We are now highly befuddled and are going to lie down in a dark room.

If you’re not feeling too confused, go and view images of this monocoque machine on Jme Wheeler’s Photostream.

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Size Isn’t Everything

Lego Micro-scale Vehicles

At least, that’s what your Mom told this TLCB writer. It’s a philosophy adopted by Flickr’s LEGO 7 too, who has constructed this charming micro-scale scene in which none of the vehicles are more than two studs in width. They’re all instantly identifiable though, with a taxi, police car, excavator, cement truck, ambulance, semi truck, coupe and bus all recreated brilliantly in miniature and placed within a clever modular roadway. There’s lots more to see of all the vehicles plus the neatly designed base at LEGO 7’s photostream – click the link above to check it out.

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Tiny Lego Wonders – Book Review

Tiny Lego Wonders Review

‘Where can I get instructions / How do I build it?’. It’s the single most frequently asked question that we receive here at TLCB – so just how do you start ‘MOCing’?

It’s a question we raised in our review of the superb No Starch Press produced ‘Art of Lego Scale Modeling‘ book last year, and one that, since LEGO discontinued their brilliant Ideas Books, has gone unanswered. Now though, No Starch Press have created a book aimed squarely at fulfilling this need.

Tiny Lego Wonders, written by LEGO-Ambassador Mattia Zamboni, features 200 pages of clear instructions for 40 wonderfully realistic miniature vehicles, from cars to buses via trains, aircraft, construction equipment and more. The book is divided into sections that categorise these models according to where you might find them in the real world, for example the airport, the harbour, and the construction site.

Each location section features a double-page spread showing all of the vehicles within it in a large brick-built scene. It’s a simple yet brilliant addition that’s very reminiscent of LEGO’s old annual catalogues and it’s sure to provide a huge amount of inspiration.

Lego Instructions Book

Every set of instructions starts with a high quality image of the finished model, just as any official LEGO set does, along with a parts list and a difficulty level. The instructions themselves are beautifully clear and the build process will be familiar to anyone who has constructed an official LEGO set.

There are perhaps slightly fewer steps and marginally more complicated sub-assemblies than you’ll find in LEGO’s own work, but if anything LEGO have over-simplified their instructions in recent times and Tiny Lego Wonders seems to have struck a good balance between conciseness and difficulty.

Lego TGV Train Instructions

Where Tiny Lego Wonders scores huge points is with its inspiration potential. All of the models featured use common non-specialist parts, but even so it’s unlikely that most builders will have the exact part and colour combinations to recreate the model piece-for-piece as per the instructions. However the instructions are so good, and the models so thoughtfully designed, that changing the colours or design slightly is really easy. And once you’ve done that, you’ve started MOCing!

Some sections also include images of additional variations of the model detailed in the instructions, showing what can be done with a few simple changes. Again, these are really easy to replicate (even though they aren’t included in the instructions) and having a go yourself will instantly turn you into a ‘MOCer’.

Lego Car Instructions

Are there any disappointments? Nope, not really. Perhaps a few of the large double-page scenes look a little over-polished / too digitalised to these eyes, but other than that Tiny Lego Wonders might be the perfect MOCer’s book. Which gives us a bit of a dilemma in giving a rating because, despite the general ineptitude in TLCB office, there are some talented builders here who would have limited use for such a book. However, Tiny Lego Wonders isn’t aimed at the microscopic demographic of ‘Lego Blogger’, and thus we can ignore our usage and rate it accordingly;

Tiny Lego Wonders

Buy this book! Even at just £13 / $17 for the hardcover on Amazon, Tiny Lego Wonders is as beautifully produced as all No Starch Press publications, but for it to remain pristine on a bookshelf or coffee table would be a great shame. Tiny Lego Wonders needs to look dog-eared, shabby and worn out, because the value of this book is in its use; Tiny Lego Wonders could be the launchpad you need to start your MOCing journey.

From now on when anyone asks us ‘How do I build it?’ we’re going to give the same answer; You start here.

✮✮✮✮✮

No Starch Press

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Micro Machines

Micro 01

The tiny minds of The Lego Car Blog Elves are often attracted to tiny things. Today they’ve returned with two vehicles. First up is a Micro Scale Rat Rod from Primoz Mlakar. The car has been photographed on a neat, forced perspective background. Second is an even tinier motorbike. The Velocitech Vortex has been built by Dylan Denton and features a minifgure hand kick stand.

Remember, you don’t need loads of Technic and expensive Power Functions motors to be featured here. Think about what components you have in your collection and how you might use them creatively and you never know, our Elves might pay you visit.*

micro 02

*Please note that TLCB declines responsibility for damages caused by Elves attempting to breach any security measures that you might use to protect your Lego.

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Duck Dynasty

Lego Donald Duck Car

LEGO’s licensing division has brought a variety of well loved characters to the mini-figure range in recent times. Disney’s cartoon characters are some of the latest, and here Donald Duck shows that ducks are good inside more than just pancakes. Donald and his cartoon wheels were suggested by a reader and you can see more courtesy of LegoJalex on Flickr.

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Little Wonders

Lego Cars

The last few posts here at TLCB have been skewed towards the big Technicy end of the spectrum, but you don’t need a billion bricks and your own workshop to build something blog-worthy.

Proof comes from Flickr builders de-marco and Horcik Designs (who’s appearing for the second time today). De-marco’s 5-wide mini-figure coupe and Horcik’s neat hovercar can be found on Flickr via the links above.

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It Ain’t What You Do…

Lil'rod

…it’s the way that you do it. After some of the comments about 4-wide cars here at The Lego Car Blog, we thought that we’d better blog one! A great example of doing something creative on a small scale is Grantmasters’ “Size Matters” hot-rod. Click the link in the text to spot the nice parts usage in the model or click this link to see where today’s title came from. Ah, Bananarama…

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Elf For a Day

Lego Cars

The Elves are going hungry at the moment, because for the last few days they haven’t found a thing. Luckily for us, you guys have, and so today we have three of your finds. On the left is MOCpages’ Jase G’s ‘Little Bit of Muscle‘, which the Elves would probably like to have found themselves, in the centre is a lovely Town-scale Chevrolet G20 van by a builder known simply as ‘Ben’, and on the right is Yoong Cherng Ee’s awesome looking Nissan Silvia S13 in full time-attack spec.

You can see more of each model by clicking on the links in the text, and if you’d like to suggest a creation to us here at TLCB you can do so via FlickrMail, the Submission Suggestions page, or by completing the Feedback form. You can also let us know if you’d like guest blogger status – if your english skills are good your words could appear alongside your find here too!

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Fast and Fictional

Lego Car

We received a suggestion to our Feedback page last week, but it was TLCB Office Poker Night at the time and thus we were a bit pre-occupied. Fortunately the reader in question kindly accepted some unpaid writing work and joins us a Guest Blogger today. Over to Alexander Paschoaletto;

If you decide to build a real car in Lego form you’ll face the challenge of having to replicate all the lines according to the original vehicle, which may be something horrible if you’re bricking up a Fiat Uno, or insanely complicated if you’re building a Mazda Furai. However, if you decide to create your own ride instead, you’ll have a very different challenge on your hands. Considering, of course, that you’re trying to create something totally original without copying anything else.

Alex B is one of the few TFOLs out there who can easily meet both challenges with skill, and his latest effort does not fail to impress. His ‘Vortex Orca 4.0i’ features stunning detailing and such a clean look – it’s simple but great. In addition, he took some beautiful shots in a very professional way, which further adds to his positive points. Keep it up, Alex!

Thanks Alexander! You can see more of Alex B’s fictional coupe here, and more of Alexander’s own work on Flickr at the link above.

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A New Tumbler

Tumbling Car

This particular tumbler isn’t the Dark Knight’s latest set of wheels, it’s the work of Vimal “vlmn8r” Patel and Peter “Mahj” Kreuger. The “Bugroll” zooms along and then performs an acrobatic front flip. Mahj has a history of building cars that move in unusual ways and we featured his “Cadmium” lowrider earlier this year. Once you’ve watched the YouTube video below, click on this link to Mahj’s Flickr Photostream to see the details of how the car works.

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Our Fine Four Fendered Friend

Chitty 01

Okay, we admit it, the Elf Riot was our fault. It all started when we promised our pointy-eared workers a night off, watching a DVD. The story was based on a book by the man who wrote James Bond and the film features some explosions and a transforming car. What could go wrong?

The Elves settled down in expectation of seeing something with Megan Fox, fireballs, Megan Fox, Optimus Prime, Megan Fox… Well you get the idea. Dick van Dyke just didn’t cut it. The Elves who made it through the ensuing mutiny and endured 144 minutes of 1960s musical spectacular have been irredeemably scarred.*

Anyhow, relax and feast your eyes on Ralph Savelsberg’s latest creation in his series of vehicles from film and TV. Featuring detachable wings and a brick-built Caractacus Pott, this Lego version of the most expensive theatre prop of all time looks splendid on its vintage, 1970s wheels. Click the link in the text to see more photos of this car, including WIP shots and Ralph’s neat solution to building Chitty Chitty Bang Bang’s long exhaust pipe.

Chitty 02

*They’ve started to demand payment in Toot Sweets instead of Smarties.

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15 Pieces of Fame

Lego Roadster

Ok, Calvin Sun’s Roadster has a few more pieces than fifteen, but nevertheless it does prove you don’t need oodles of bricks to makes something blogworthingly cool. Check it out on Flickr here.

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Toscana

Toscana Front

Many of Angka Utama’s cars are like the Elves, complex and small. The Toscana is a good example of this, including a drop down rear engine. Actually, on second thoughts the Elves are a worryingly simple bunch. On third thoughts, the Elves’ diet of sugary Smarties and fizzy drinks means that they’re getting a bit tubby too. Please click on this link to Angka’s Flickr Photostream to have a closer look at the Toscana’s features, whilst we go and find some better similes.*

Toscana Back

*I didn’t want to be a blog writer anyway. I wanted to be a lumberjack.

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Wheels of Whimsy

Lego Art-Deco Trike

The inside of Vince Toulouse‘s mind must be an interesting – and rather beautiful – place to live. Vince has appeared here previously with his wonderfully art-deco spaceships, and he’s now transferred his uniquely brilliant style to wheeled wonders. These two spectacular creations can be found at Vince’s most excellent Flickr photostream, click the link above and submerge yourself in Vince’s sea of brick-built loveliness.

Lego Sci-Fi Art-Deco Car

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