Tag Archives: 2016

42054 Technic Claas Xerion 5000 Review

Lego Technic 42054 Claas Xerion Review

It’s time for another official LEGO set review here at The Lego Car Blog, and it’s a big one. Welcome to the Claas Xerion 5000 Trac VC.

This TLCB staff member has wanted to get his hands on LEGO’s 42054 Claas Xerion set ever since he first saw it. A large lime-green tractor now sits next to him as he types, so has it met expectations?…

42054 sits, a little surprisingly, in the middle of the current Technic range. A little while ago it would have probably been the Technic flagship, but so huge are the current models getting that the Claas is less than half the price of the Volvo L350F and Porsche 911 GT3 RS. However at almost 2,000 pieces 42054 actually features a few hundred more than the big Volvo.

Many of these are new too, with brand new (awesome) tyres, and a wealth of new bushes and pin connectors making their debut in this set. LEGO have employed a few interesting techniques in building with these, as some of these parts are used purely as a construction aid (think an unseen bracket on a car bodyshell that serves no purpose once the car is built, but allows a robot to align a laser or something during manufacturing), and all are coloured in a way that aims to assist with the build process (as opposed to the colour being chosen to best suit the finished model’s aesthetics).

If that makes you concerned about how authentic the Claas looks, don’t be. 42054 is one of the finest looking Technic sets ever produced, and it continues the trend of featuring almost Model Team levels of detailing, with Technic lift-arm holes concealed by smooth plates, lights, mirrors, and some very well chosen stickers.

The downside of the aforementioned colour choices is that black and dark grey parts can look almost identical in the instruction booklet, and when you first come across one of the new pieces you may spend ages looking for it amongst a sea of 2,000 bricks, scanning for black, when it is in fact nestling in a pile of grey. Not that this reviewer did that of course. He’s far too experienced to make that mistake.

Lego 42054 Review Claas Xerion

Colours aside the instructions are clearly laid out, and feature some huge sub-assemblies. Which brings us neatly on to a new phenomenon that the Claas Xerion demonstrates wonderfully; Density of Engineering.

Yes, we have just made that phrase up, but 42054 features some of the most compressed and tightly-packed mechanics of any LEGO set. Ever.

It’s the first set where the design has genuinely amazed us in its complexity – it’s so far above our building ability that we could never hope to better it. Some of this engineering brilliance fulfils relatively simple tasks, for example when the motor isn’t in use the battery box is automatically switched off (a thoughtful piece of design), whilst other elements, such as the three-mode steering, are mind-bendingly fantastic. Continue reading

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2016 Year in Review

Lego 2017

We’ve made it to 2017! Here’s our round-up of the year that was…

Yes, we’ve survived another year! 2016 may have been filled with odd politics, scary news stories, and celebrity deaths, but The Lego Car Blog continues to amaze us.

Despite this site being as ropey and incompetent as it’s always been, in 2016 TLCB smashed through the one million views per year mark! A million a year! For those working behind the scenes here in TLCB Towers, and knowing how out of our depth we really are with the whole running a website thing, this is an unbelievable statistic.

Although we have no idea how the annual view count has surpassed a million it is good news for the online Lego community’s vehicle builders, as we hope we’re giving recognition to a genre that a few years ago was overlooked by the proper Lego blogs (who have now joined the party in blogging vehicles too).

It’s also good news for the various charities and aid organisations that we support. Your views and clicks mean that this site earns a small monthly revenue. As most of our workforce is populated by mythical creatures paid in sugar-coated chocolate confectionary we don’t need this, and thus we’re able to pass it on to those that do, thanks entirely to your visits.

In 2017 we may explore updating the site to properly accommodate advertisements, as we do now feel a duty to do our best to maximise our earnings, but we’ll let you know about this should it happen later in the year.

In the meantime we’ll aim to keep bringing you the very best vehicular creations, set reviews, LEGO news, and builder interviews, and we look forward to another year being totally puzzled by the fact that people actually come here to read the inane nonsense we publish.

Wishing you all the very best for 2017

TLCB Team

P.S. The Lego Car Blog is on Facebook now too! Click here to stay in touch via Mark Zuckerberg’s bank account.

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21307 Caterham Seven 620R Review

Lego 21307 Caterham Seven Review

The Lego Car Blog Review My Set Competition is nearly at an end, but we’ve just got time to squeeze a few more of your Set Reviews in before the competition closes in December. MOCpages’ Marco. qm joins us today with the set that everyone’s talking about, fresh from the LEGO Ideas platform and designed by TLCB Master MOCer Carl Greatrix, it’s the magnificent Caterham 7 620R…

The LEGO Company are known for making strong and resistant sets. Lego Fans are experts in making good-looking cars. When they get together, great things can happen. Things like a LEGO Ideas project that achieved the magical number of 10,000 supporters to gain approval to become an official LEGO set, which in in this case is the Caterham Seven 620R by Carl Greatrix.

Two years ago, on December 2014, Carl’s Seven started its journey on LEGO Ideas, by May 2015 it reached 10,000 votes and finally in March of this year Carl’s design was approved for production as an official LEGO set.

Now let’s talk about the product, the $79.00 brick-built Caterham, or as the builder called it ‘the kit of a kit car’. Although officially licensed by Caterham, 21307 is not a particularly expensive set; it’s $20 cheaper than LEGO’s previous Creator Expert sets and it comes in a nice black box with wider cardboard usual, something that I think is a nice detail.

Upon opening it, you’ll find one instructions book and seven bags of bricks, with the typical larger 1, 2 and 3 numbered bags, plus some smaller bags with the same numbers on them.

Lego 21307 Caterham 7 Review

The moment you start building it you notice how cleverly designed the 21307 set is, with a very rigid chassis and a nicely detailed exterior, it’s a builder’s dream. Upon finishing the first part of the build you’ll already have a strong chassis and the rear fenders completed.

Next you open the bags labeled with a 2 and build the second stage of the car, in which you construct the engine, the seats, the front wheel arches (which by the way are very well designed!) and the exhaust. Basically all you’re missing after this is the nose cone, the hood, the trunk and the wheels. Continue reading

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From Flickr to Stores…

Lego Caterham Seven Set

Master MOCers is back!… And Episode 2 is blurring the lines between itself and the Become a Pro series more than ever before. Today’s interviewee could well fit into either category, but as recipients of the Master MOCers award are rumoured to receive a priceless trophy, he thought this series best.

Carl Greatrix has appeared here several times over the years, most recently with the evolution of his stunning Caterham Seven model. Thanks to the LEGO Ideas platform that model has now become a real LEGO set, officially licensed by Caterham themselves, and is available to buy today! From the pages of Flickr to the shelves of stores, Carl has made his Lego dream happen. Find out how via the link below…

Master MOCers, Series 2, Episode 2

Carl Greatrix

Hello TLCB Readers! My name is Carl Greatrix, I’m a member of the Brickish Association (U.K. LUG), I’m also the Senior LEGO Model Designer for TT Games / Warner Bros (for the official LEGO video games), and I now have my own LEGO Ideas set produced, the Caterham Seven 620R – 21307. Continue reading…

Lego Caterham Seven Set

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31041 Construction Vehicles – Set Review

31041

Come with us on a journey as we review the cheapest set that The Lego Car Blog has ever examined. We thought that we’d have a change from the big Technic sets that usually feature here. At £3.49 (30% off) from amazon will our purchase prove to be value for money? How will it rate for fun and playability? Will the Elves eat most of the 64 pieces before we can use them? Read on…

Packaged in LEGO’s usual bright and attractive box, 31041 scores over a large Technic set by only requiring a strong thumb to open its cardboard tab. None of that cutting or ripping sticky tabs here. Collectors will obviously want to cut the packaging open with a sharp knife in order to preserve its collectability, in a manner similar to this video.  A recurring theme of our reviews is the need for parts to come in numbered bags in order to reduce confusion & sorting and to help make building more pleasurable. Sadly the bag of parts is not numbered, possible as there is only one.  On the up side, a quick flick through the 32 page instruction book reveals that it contains instructions for all three models. As we’ve mentioned in other reviews, it would be great it if LEGO did this for their big, expensive Technic sets too. At the moment, builders having to traipse off to Lego.com and download PDF files.

31041_prod_sec_1488

Moving on to the build, the headline model is rapidly built in 14 pages. The construction is the conventional, studs up type. There’s nice use of commonplace bricks, such as 1×1 round bricks and headlight bricks with 1×1 round plates to give the detailing. There’s also the neat use of a 1×2 tile, at the centre of the model, which will make it easier for children to take apart and re-build (which is what LEGO is supposed to be for!). The backhoe is a conventional bit of building too but the front bucket and its arms, are a good example of economical use of parts to good effect.

Builders young and old can learn quite a bit from this tiny model. As with short stories when compared with novels, micro-scale builds force modellers to consider each and every brick carefully. With model completed, you’re left with a spare 1×1 trans-orange round plate, a dark grey clip arm and three 1×1 light grey round plates to shovel around.

31041_1488x838

In terms of functionality, this is a strong build, which rolls well across a floor or table. Sadly it suffers from the usual problem in LEGO vehicles of having poor Ackerman steering geometry. This is probably due to it having no steering but let’s skate over that one. Both buckets are firmly attached to the body of the tractor and have good ranges of movement. It’s a bit tricky to keep the grey plates on the front bucket, though this can be improved by swapping the corner pieces from the backhoe with on of the 1×2 edge pieces. Overall the model is fun and nice proportioned. It would be great if it had different diameter tyres, fore & aft, like a JCB but that would reduce the flexibility for making other models.

The other two vehicles are strong and fun to build and play with too. The dumper is a particularly nice little model. The way that the rear skip hinges is neatly and interestingly done.

This set is a great little parts pack, with most of the pieces in standard LEGO colours such as black, yellow and grey. There are four, yellow 1×2 curved bricks amongst other useful stuff. It’s also a brilliant, cheap bit of fun for the younger builder in your household: a great addition to that order for the 42055 that you’re buying for yourself (yes, we know, those big yellow rings are essential for your next MOC and it’s the only way to get hold of them). At this price, you could buy three 31041s and build one of each vehicle to use together in a diorama (obviously you wouldn’t be playing with them). Go on, make that investment!

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Creations for Charity 2016

creations-for-charity

This year’s Creations for Charity starts today. To find out how you can get involved, by either donating or buying Lego models, visit this link to the Creations for Charity website. Once again, Lego creations from some of the world’s top builders will up for sale, so it’s well worth keeping your eye on what’s going on. Your money will go to provide Lego sets for underprivileged children in countries around the world, so pay a visit now!

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Lego Caterham Seven 620R – 21307 Set Preview

Lego 21307 Caterham Seven Review

It’s finally here! After sending a crack team of commando Elves into The LEGO Company headquarters we are delighted to reveal the latest release from LEGO’s Ideas programme, the officially-licensed 21307 Caterham Seven 620R!

Designed by Carl Greatrix, and first featured here over 2 years ago, the design was picked up and backed by Caterham themselves, and in March of this year we revealed it had been chosen as the next official fan-designed LEGO set.

Joining the authorised sets from Ferrari, Ford, McLaren, Porsche, Mini, Volkswagen, Mercedes-Benz, Volvo and others, LEGO’s latest real-world replica looks every bit as good as we hoped it would.

Aimed at ages 12+ we’re expecting around 700 pieces from the set when it goes on sale later in the year, and it’s one set we can’t wait to review! Congratulations to Carl, who has seen his design go from a usual Flickr upload to an official LEGO set, and we’ll bring you more news on 21307 later in 2016!

Lego 21307 Caterham 7 Review

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Tiny Lego Wonders – Book Review

Tiny Lego Wonders Review

‘Where can I get instructions / How do I build it?’. It’s the single most frequently asked question that we receive here at TLCB – so just how do you start ‘MOCing’?

It’s a question we raised in our review of the superb No Starch Press produced ‘Art of Lego Scale Modeling‘ book last year, and one that, since LEGO discontinued their brilliant Ideas Books, has gone unanswered. Now though, No Starch Press have created a book aimed squarely at fulfilling this need.

Tiny Lego Wonders, written by LEGO-Ambassador Mattia Zamboni, features 200 pages of clear instructions for 40 wonderfully realistic miniature vehicles, from cars to buses via trains, aircraft, construction equipment and more. The book is divided into sections that categorise these models according to where you might find them in the real world, for example the airport, the harbour, and the construction site.

Each location section features a double-page spread showing all of the vehicles within it in a large brick-built scene. It’s a simple yet brilliant addition that’s very reminiscent of LEGO’s old annual catalogues and it’s sure to provide a huge amount of inspiration.

Lego Instructions Book

Every set of instructions starts with a high quality image of the finished model, just as any official LEGO set does, along with a parts list and a difficulty level. The instructions themselves are beautifully clear and the build process will be familiar to anyone who has constructed an official LEGO set.

There are perhaps slightly fewer steps and marginally more complicated sub-assemblies than you’ll find in LEGO’s own work, but if anything LEGO have over-simplified their instructions in recent times and Tiny Lego Wonders seems to have struck a good balance between conciseness and difficulty.

Lego TGV Train Instructions

Where Tiny Lego Wonders scores huge points is with its inspiration potential. All of the models featured use common non-specialist parts, but even so it’s unlikely that most builders will have the exact part and colour combinations to recreate the model piece-for-piece as per the instructions. However the instructions are so good, and the models so thoughtfully designed, that changing the colours or design slightly is really easy. And once you’ve done that, you’ve started MOCing!

Some sections also include images of additional variations of the model detailed in the instructions, showing what can be done with a few simple changes. Again, these are really easy to replicate (even though they aren’t included in the instructions) and having a go yourself will instantly turn you into a ‘MOCer’.

Lego Car Instructions

Are there any disappointments? Nope, not really. Perhaps a few of the large double-page scenes look a little over-polished / too digitalised to these eyes, but other than that Tiny Lego Wonders might be the perfect MOCer’s book. Which gives us a bit of a dilemma in giving a rating because, despite the general ineptitude in TLCB office, there are some talented builders here who would have limited use for such a book. However, Tiny Lego Wonders isn’t aimed at the microscopic demographic of ‘Lego Blogger’, and thus we can ignore our usage and rate it accordingly;

Tiny Lego Wonders

Buy this book! Even at just £13 / $17 for the hardcover on Amazon, Tiny Lego Wonders is as beautifully produced as all No Starch Press publications, but for it to remain pristine on a bookshelf or coffee table would be a great shame. Tiny Lego Wonders needs to look dog-eared, shabby and worn out, because the value of this book is in its use; Tiny Lego Wonders could be the launchpad you need to start your MOCing journey.

From now on when anyone asks us ‘How do I build it?’ we’re going to give the same answer; You start here.

✮✮✮✮✮

No Starch Press

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The Big Blue – 42042 Crawler Crane Set Review

Most of The Lego Car Blog team are die-hard petrol heads, who exclusively build Technic supercars, filled with working features and Power Functions. However, this writer is not really a car expert nor a Technic expert either. I was recently defenestrated at a TLCB party for having suggested that it might be fun to try to build a spaceship. Fortunately, I survived the incident. The TLCB executive penthouse offices are actually located on the ground floor of a small industrial unit near Wolverhampton. Much chastened, I have resolved to learn more of the art and craft of big-scale, motorised Technic models. What better way to do this than to build one of the monsters of the current Technic range: the 42042 Crawler Crane.

Lego Technic 42042 Review

The set came in nicely large box, with the usual high-quality photos showing the various functions of the crane. The back of the box shows the “A” and “B” models. In contrast to Sariel’s review, I thought that the box was nicely full when I opened it. Tipping the various bags out of the box took me back to childhood Christmases and the excitement of opening the old Technic sets with their studded beams. The first thing that struck me was that the various bags were numbered, just like big System models are nowadays. As I built the model, it was great that I only had one bag open at a time. This made finding the right parts quicker, less frustrating and more fun. A previous big Technic model that I have built had numbered bags but you had to open most of them early in the build, which defeated the point of them in my eyes.

The instruction book is neatly presented and strongly bound. It’s a nice artefact in its own right. Lego instruction books are a lot better at differentiating between dark grey and black than they used to be and this one was easy to use. Disappointingly, for a model in this price range, you have download the instructions for the “B” model from Lego’s website. As the “B” model looks to have the same chassis, there wouldn’t even be the expense of an entire second book. The stickers for the model are in the same bag, which had kept them flat in my case. However, I can see that there’s scope for them to be creased and mangled by the heavy instruction book and so it would be better if they were mounted on a separate card.

LEGO_42042_PROD_DET02_1488

Once I started the build, it turned out that there were actually multiple bags to open for each stage of the build. It was still a lot quicker than sorting through all 1,401 parts in a big pile. First up is the chassis, based around the ubiquitous but strong 64178 differential frame. Building progresses rapidly, with lots of pieces per page. This contrasts noticeably to System sets, especially the ones aimed at younger builders. For most of the stages, I had just five small piles of parts to look through, thanks again to the numbered bags.  After the main chassis, you build each of the sponsons for the tracks. When the two are mated, you begin to realise quite how big this model is going to be. Building the second sponson is a bit boring, as it’s a mirror image of the first but that’s inevitable with this design. When I attached the sponsons, I thought that 5L axles with end stops will be awkward to remove when I disassemble the model. I couldn’t work out why Lego hadn’t used ordinary 5L axles instead. Perhaps one of our Technic expert readers has an idea? Page 48 of the instructions has another step that might prove hard to reverse on disassembly.

By page 54, the chassis was done and it was time to get a coffee and then sit down to assemble each of the huge, 45 link tracks. Whilst I clicked the links together, I reflected on the size and complexity of the finished chassis. It reminded me that much of what you pay for in a Technic set is the immense amount of R&D time that must go into a model like this. To speed up the assembly of the tracks, I made standard 10 link lengths and then clipped them together, adding the last five.  Strangely, for a set of this size and price, there is no spare link of track. Technic is a harsh mistress. Be careful opening the bags of parts and accidentally losing some. By the end of stage one, I had just five spare pieces and no spares of the small cogs or blue, 2L axle/peg connectors. By the end of the build, I had just over a dozen spares, including the 1×1 round transparent plates used as lights.

Stage 2 looks fast, with just three bags of parts. It builds the gearbox and includes four of the newer sliding gear change collars and a pair of the white, 24T, torque limiting clutch gears. There are also some of the new and very useful 1L collars. Once more, the complexity of the design reminded me of how much design and development time you’re paying for in a big Technic set. This also applies to the design and quality of the individual pieces. Just one L motor drives the all of the functions through this gearbox. That two functions can operate simultaneously, is a testament to the power of modern Lego motors. The end of this stage leaves very few spare parts again. I was actually a blue 2L connector peg short and had to nip upstairs and get one from my collection.

LEGO 42042 Review

By now I was 96 pages and 1 ¾ hours into the build. There were four more bags of parts left to go. Continue reading

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Nine-One-Nine

Lego Porsche 919 Hybrid Le Mans

Porsche have made it two wins in a row at the Le Mans 24 Hour race when this year Toyota’s TS050 suffered a heartbreaking mechanical failure with just one lap to go. All of the prototype class competitors are remarkable machines, with more diversity amongst the top three than in the whole Formula 1 grid, and it’s Porsche’s 919 Hybrid that is perhaps the most unusual. A tiny turbocharged V4 is mated to a suite of electric motors giving the car immense power, but also (and importantly for a 24 hour race) good fuel efficiency too.

This stunning replica of 2016’s Le Mans winning Porsche 919 comes from Charbel of Eurobricks, and it features a recreation of the 919’s turbo-four, plus a four-speed sequential gearbox, independent suspension, and working steering. It’s a true Technic Supercar and you can see all the images on Eurobricks at the link above.

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I Still Ain’t Afraid Of No Ghost

Lego Ghostbusters ECTO-1 2016 Movie

We’re not really sure that the Ghostbusters franchise was in need of a reboot for 2016, but you never know, it might be good. Whatever the outcome, it’s given TLCB regular Ralph Savelsberg aka Mad Physicist another movie car to recreate for his collection. You can see more of his 2016 ECTO-1 complete with characters from the latest Ghostbusters movie on Flickr at the link above.

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LEGO at Le Mans

Lego Ford GT Ecoboost Le Mans 2016

It’s 50 years since Ford famously finished the Le Mans 24 Hour race with a 1-2-3, thanks to their stunning Lola-developed GT40. Half a decade later and Ford returned to Le Mans with their new GT, aiming to prove to America that big inefficient V8s really have had their day, and the future is smaller, more efficient, and turbo-charged.

This astonishing creation is the work of professional model-maker Pascal Lenhard, who was commissioned by Ford to build a replica of their 2016 GTE-competing racing car. Three weeks and 40,000 bricks later and this is the incredible result.

A full gallery of images is available to view at the Autoweek website (thanks to one of our readers for the tip!), where there are also images of an original 1960s Ford GT40 model that Pascal built to accompany his recreation of Ford’s latest Le Mans challenger.

And 50 years on, did Ford manage a Le Mans comeback worthy of their original result? They sure did, with the new Ford GT winning the GTE class and taking third place. In fact the team were only denied repeating their remarkable 1966 1-2-3 finish by some cheating Italians.

It’s good to have you back Ford!

Lego Ford GT 2016

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Creator Volkswagen Beetle 10252 – Set Preview

Lego 10252 Volkswagen Beetle Set 2016

We find it a bit odd that Adolf Hitler’s car for the people became such a hit with peace loving hippy surfer types, but nevertheless if there’s one brand synonymous with surf culture, it’s Volkswagen. LEGO’s partnership with Volkswagen has been a fruitful one too, with the excellent T1 Camper and their previous 10187 Beetle being highlights of their licensing programme.

LEGO had decided to continue this affinity with Volkswagen with their newest Creator release, this superb surf-ready 1960s Beetle. Aimed at ages 16+ 10252 contains 1,167 pieces, including a printed VW logo brick, new fender parts and a new windshield, and features a detailed flat-4 engine, interior, surfboard and cool-box.

We expect the 10252 Volkswagen Beetle set to cost around $100/£70 when it reaches stores in August, and it looks like a sure fire hit!

New 10252 Volkswagen Beetle  Lego Creator

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Not A Review

Lego Technic Porsche 911 GT3RS Review

When the previews for the ‘Ultimate’ Technic 42056 Porsche were circulating, I was certain that I’d buy one, as a Lego fan and petrolhead; even though I’m not overly fond of the Volkswagen Beetle Sport…. a review was promised in short order.

Well, here it isn’t – for a couple of reasons.

First, LEGO pulled it from sale before it was even offered, to fix a packaging problem we were told. If by packaging problem they mean packaging an errata sheet in the instructions… We will see. It seems the massive weight of that doorstop  sized coffee table book was crushing the boxes around it.

Second, early reviews were not encouraging, highlighting a number of reasons why this isn’t really ‘Ultimate’ in anything but price.

Technically, the steering and suspension are identical to the 42039 Le Mans car. No fancy tricks, just the basics. I don’t really care about the colour of the springs if the geometry is nothing like the real car… The flat six engine is bog standard and completely hidden. There’s plenty of space back there to have a go at modelling camshafts, say, but no attempt was made at anything above the ordinary.

Likewise, no attempt was made at any kind of rear wheel steering, a notable feature of the real 911 GT3RS. The only technical aspect that shows any ambition is the gearbox, more on which in a bit… So, if you want the ultimate Lego Technic car, stick to your 8880.

What about that much heralded build experience? It’s an idea that’s appeared before, in the 8448, which does the modularity thing a whole lot better. Since I haven’t (and probably won’t unless 42056 appears at a steep discount) built the Porsche, the jury will have to stay out on that one.

Ultimate packaging maybe? It would be if the box had a strong plastic insert to sort the pieces into and lots of pictures of alternate builds. For that, you’ll need an 853. I do understand what they mean by the ‘premium experience’ of the Porsche but like a lot of things, the word ‘premium’ just means you pay more.

Ultimate looks?

LEGO Technic 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS

It is pretty, and the orange (close-but-no-cigar to the real Porsche’s ‘lava orange’ colour) does look good. But with its awkward gaps around the headlights and taillights, messy interior and clumsy rear end is it as pretty as the Creator Ferrari F40? Not to these eyes.

Now then, that gearbox, surely that must be the most impressive such thing in a Lego car?

If you like your changing up sequence to be 1-3-2-4 and lots of friction, then yes. A lot of said friction can apparently be blamed on this little fella:

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It’s a small bevel gear assembly built in the very early stages, and the problem is that pin joiner, used as a spacer. Change it for a couple of bushes and it’s fine. Expect that to be instruction errata number 1. According to Sariel’s review on Eurobricks, there are twenty gears engaged in first gear; so don’t expect that to completely solve the friction problem. Now we know why the white clutch gear was included in the powertrain…

As for the shift sequence, this can be corrected by swapping a 12T double bevel and a 16T spur gear on the back of the gearbox, which suggests a simple error in the instructions. Or it would if LEGO hadn’t tried to tell us it was ‘to reduce friction and enhance the premium experience’ or some such tosh. According to everyone who’s built one, the positions of these gears makes no difference to the friction. That’ll be errata number 2.

If these two problems are solved – and they should be when it becomes available again – this gearbox will be an impressive feat, for all that you can still change up from 4 back to 1 and have four reverse gears. That sounds like fun. Finally, it’s possible to drive a 911 as if its engine is in the right place. Backwards…

So it might actually be the ultimate gearbox. £250 is a lot to pay for a gearbox.

Hang on a sec, it’s got a handbag as well, so there’s that… it’d better be a Hermes…

Lego Technic 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Review

Sorry LEGO. I know you tried. The idea for an ‘Ultimate’ series of Technic models is a great one which should produce something fantastic that we’ll all love. It’s just that 42056 isn’t it. It feels like the product of two partners with conflicting priorities, rather like the McLaren-Mercedes SLR; when the 8880 felt like LEGO’s McLaren F1

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LEGO Technic 42056 – Porsche 911 GT3 RS Set Preview

Lego Technic 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Review

IT’S HERE! LEGO Technic’s incredible 1:8 Porsche 911 GT3 RS, scooped here earlier in the year, has been officially unveiled!

Officially licensed by Porsche, 42056 is one of the largest and most complex sets ever released by the Technic line, featuring over 2,700 pieces and aimed at ages 16+.

Unlike the first spy-shots of this set, the final production version drops its camouflage paint-work as we expected and now wears a gloriously bright orange hue. 42056 also debuts several new pieces not seen before, rides on unique replica Porsche wheels and wears authentic Porsche decals throughout.

Lego Technic 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Review

The building process has been designed to mirror the way the real car is manufactured, which is an interesting variation from the usual Technic construction process, and each model contains a collectors’ book and an individual serial number, which means we fully expect many of these sets will sit forever unopened in the hands of speculators (boo).

That’s a shame, because 42056 contains some fabulous engineering which has raised the bar in terms of what can be expected from an official LEGO product.

Alongside the usual working steering, suspension and piston engine there is a functioning double-clutch gearbox complete with steering-wheel mounted paddles, just like the PDK transmission used on the real car – something our in-house engineers cautiously hoped for when they dissected the very first teaser image of this set back in January. With four speeds operable from the steering wheel we’re expecting some rubberised or elasticated witchcraft from LEGO’s design department, and it could be the most inventive function added to an official LEGO set in decades.

Opening doors, engine lid, glovebox and trunk all feature, as does Porsche branded luggage and a fully detailed interior with racing seats.

Available from June this year, we’re already saving up to get our hands on 42056 (unless anyone at LEGO is willing to give us a copy!), and we anticipate an RRP of around $300/£250.

Lego 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Set

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