Tag Archives: 42056

Lego in Lock-Down

With less than a week to go in TLCB’s Lock-Down B-Model Competition we have three more alternate builds to share, each of which has made the shortlist to win an awesome SBrick Plus Pro Pack!

First up (above) is a B-Model from one of LEGO’s newest sets, the 42111 Fast & Furious Dom’s Dodge Charger. Built by Matt Walker aka cleansupgood, this excellent prototype endurance racer features working steering, a mid-mounted flat-8 engine driven by the rear wheels, front and rear suspension, and an opening engine cover. Matt let us know about his competition entry via Facebook and there’s more to see of his 42111 B-Model on Bricksafe via the link above or on Flickr here.

Today’s second competition entry comes from Kieran Gutteridge who is making his TLCB debut with his 42093 alternate off-roader. Using only the parts found within the official LEGO Technic Chevrolet Corvette ZR1 set, Kieran’s off-roader features a working inline-4 engine, rear suspension (cunningly using a flexible axle from the donor set), and working steering by both ‘Hand of God’ and the steering wheel. Head to Kieran’s photostream by clicking here to see more!

Today’s third and final entry is also the work of a newcomer, 13 year old Ondra Chlopcik, whose father let us know about his entry. Using the parts from the 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS set which has been chosen a few times in the competition so far, Ondra has crafted this brilliantly accurate Porsche 918 Cayman GTS, complete with opening doors, hood and trunk, a removable ‘convertible’ roof, a 6-cylinder engine and a two-speed gearbox.

There’s more to see of Ondra’s excellent 52056 alternate on his publicly available Google drive, and if you’d like to enter your own B-Model into the competition you have until June 30th to upload your creation. You can do so on Flickr, Eurobricks, or Brickshelf (or any other freely available platform if you let us know where we can find it!), and you can read the competition rules by clicking here.

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When 2 Become 1*

BMW’s stunning i8 is soon to be retired. A three-cylinder Mini Cooper engine and electric motors delivered kinda super car performance with kinda supermini economy. Except it didn’t really do either of those things. But it did look great.

Also looking great is James Tillson’s Technic version, built from the parts found within the 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS and the 42093 Chevrolet Corvette sets. James’ model features working steering and suspension, a three-cylinder engine, gearbox, and the option to add an electric motor to drive the front axle.

Whilst not qualifying for TLCB Lock-Down B-Model Competition as it’s made from two LEGO sets, James has already entered the contest with another build (also derived from 42056), and you can build a qualifying competition entry from two official LEGO sets, provided each set’s RRP was under $25 at launch.

There’s more to see of James’ excellent B-Model at the Eurobricks forum and on Flickr, the former of which where you can also find a video demonstrating the model’s features and a link to building instructions if you’d like to turn your own Porsche 911 GT3 RS and Chevrolet Corvette sets into a BMW i8 too.

*Today’s title song. We’re nothing if not diverse…

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My Others Car’s a Porsche 911 GT3 RS

After revealing the brand new LEGO 42115 Technic Lamborghini Sian FKP 37 (what?) set yesterday, and wishing it was a Lamborghini we’d actually heard of – like a Miura – Flickr’s James Tillson has risen to the challenge with extraordinary timing by uploading his entry into TLCB’s Lock-Down B-Model Competition which is… a Lamborghini Miura. And it’s orange!

Thanks to the 42056 Porcshe 911 GT3 RS brick source, James’ Lamborghini B-Model is as searingly orange as one of the Miura’s actual paint options, and it manages to replicate the real car’s swoopy bodywork rather well too. The model also includes working suspension, functioning steering, opening doors, engine cover and front clamshell, and there’s more to see of James’ excellent alternate on Flickr. Click here to head to James’ photostream, here to read how to enter your own B-Model into the competition, and here to see the prizes on offer!

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Buy a Porsche, Get a Datsun Free

Yup, because if you own the 42056 LEGO Technic Porcshe 911 GT3 RS set you could also own this lovely Datsun 240Z. Just not at the same time.

Builder pleasedontspammebro has created the classic Japanese sports car from the parts only found within the 42056 set, and has made instructions available so you can repurpose your own Porsche too. The Datsun features steering, a straight-6 engine, opening doors and bonnet, a 5-speed gearbox, independent suspension, and wheels that are – coming from the Porsche set – a little too large… but you can fix that.

Head to Flickr for the image above or ReBrickable to see the full specs and to get hold of the instructions.

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The Other Porsche 911 GT3 RS

Lego Porsche 911 GT3 RS

LEGO’s official Technic 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS didn’t exactly receive a rave review here at The Lego Car Blog, despite it being probably one of the most iconic LEGO sets of recent times. TLCB Master MOCer Firas Abu-Jaber aims to rectify this lack of a Lego model worthy of the badge, and has recreated Porsche’s famous special-edition 911 in spellbinding beauty in Model Team form.

Taking a month to complete Firas’ 911 GT3 RS uses some amazing techniques to replicate the 911’s famous – and fantastically difficult – bodywork, which includes opening doors, front-trunk and engine cover, whilst the interior is just as well thought out.

There’s much more to see of this incredible Porsche 911 GT3 RS at Firas Abu-Jaber’s photostream. Click here to make the jump to the full gallery of stunning images, and click here to read Firas’ interview as part of The Lego Car Blog’s Master MOCers series.

Lego Porsche 911 GT3 RS

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My Other Car’s a Porsche

Lego Technic Lancia Stratos

We were very excited when we previewed LEGO’s 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS set, and then a bit disappointed by it. Which is a shame, because it’ll still rightly go down as one of the greatest Technic sets released so far.

Nevertheless 42056 is a set that many builders can improve upon, and that’s arguably what newcomer pleasedontspammebro of Flickr has done with this excellent mid-’70s Lancia Stratos Stradale HF B-Model built entirely from the pieces found within the set.

Underneath the well-proportioned exterior which includes opening doors and front and rear clamshells is a working drivetrain consisting of a transversely mounted V6 engine, 5-speed gearbox, all-wheel suspension and functioning steering.

Suggested by a reader there’s more to see of the Lancia B-Model on Flickr via the link above, where you can also find a link to instructions so can build your very own Stratos from your 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS set.

Alternatively you can take a look at an Audi R8 B-Model featured here previously, but whichever you chose to repurpose your 42056 set for, make sure you dismantle it the right way…

Lego Technic 42056 B-Model Lancia Stratos

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Shifting Gears

Lego Technic V10 Supercar

This is the ‘Ultimatum GTR V10’, it was suggested to us by a reader, and it comes from Pvdb of Eurobricks. It is – as you can see – a very pretty thing, and draws upon a number of modern supercars for inspiration. However it’s what is underneath the sleek bodywork that’s of most note.

The usual Technic Supercar features are all present; steering, suspension, a piston engine (in this case a V10) and a gearbox. A really good gearbox…

LEGO’s official 42056 Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS set was exclusively revealed with a sequential paddle-shift gearbox here at The Lego Car Blog back in 2016, which made the anoraks in the office who spotted the feature very excited. The reality of this ground-breaking transmission however, was to be a colossal let-down. Bags of friction, only four gears, and they shifted in the wrong order. Not good.

Lego Technic Sequential Gearbox Instructions

Pvdb’s supercar aims to address the shortcomings of the 42056 set with his own sequential gearbox, with five accurately spaced ratios, plus neutral and reverse, a compact design, and control via a racing-style sequential gear lever.

The result looks miles better than LEGO’s own effort and you can check it out for yourself via Eurobricks at the link above, plus you can watch the transmission in action and build your own version of the Ultimatum GTR thanks to the instructions that have been made available on Rebrickable.

Lego Technic V10 Supercar

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My Other Car is a Porsche

Lego Technic Audi R8 V10 Plus

LEGO’s 42056 Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS set did not fair well here under the Reviewer’s gaze. Over-priced and under-engineered, 42056 is – in that regard at least – quite un-Porsche-like. However the Lego Community have been taking their hands to the GT3 RS to see if they can do better. This is the latest 42056 B-Model effort to come our way, and it looks tremendous.

Built by MOCpages’ Kasper Hansen, this Audi R8 V10 Plus almost exclusively uses parts from the Porsche 911 GT3 RS set, apart from the 3D-printed wheels (which are some of the most accurate replicas of the wheels from a real car that we’ve ever seen).

Kasper’s R8 also features a V10 engine, steering, suspension, paddle-shift gearbox (likely lifted straight from the official set),  plus opening doors, hood and engine cover. There’s more to see of Kasper’s creation over on MOCpages – click the link above to make the jump – and if you’d like to dismantle your own 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS to have a go at your own B-Model, here’s one fast way to do it…

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228mph Porsche 911 GT3 Crash

Lego Technic 42056 Porsche 911 GT3

Well, sort of. This is LEGO’s 1:8th scale 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS set, featuring a flat-6 engine, paddle-shift gearbox, independent suspension, and much orange.

And this is what happens when the German motoring organisation ADAC conducts one of its industry-leading crash tests on it…

Fired into a miniaturised deformable block at 46km/h, the 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 set was effectively put through a 228mph impact, at least by TLCB maths anyway.

The resultant devastation is absolute, however we’re not sure that the real Porsche 911 would have faired any better at that speed. Still, at least with a LEGO Porsche you can put it all back together afterwards…

Drive safe out there.

Lego Porsche 911 GT3 Crash Test

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Not a Porsche

Lego Technic 42056 B-Model Hot Rod

LEGO’s 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS set… we’re not really fans here at TLCB, and we’re also definitely not fans of the weird part of the online Lego community that seeks to buy sets like this and leave them unopened in a sealed box somewhere. By extension therefore, we are fans of this. Built exclusively from pieces found within the official Technic Porsche 911 GT3 RS set, Brickshelf’s marthart has not only opened his 42056 box but he’s used the pieces to not build the Porsche too. The hot rod pick-up he’s created from the Porsche’s parts includes a working piston engine, gearbox, independent suspension and adjustable ground clearance, it was suggested to us by a reader, and it can be found in more detail at the link above.

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Scorpion Supercar

Lego Technic Crowkillers Scorpion Supercar

We round off a busy day here at TLCB Towers with this, Crowkillers‘ stunning new supercar. Built from the pieces of the 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Technic set, Crowkillers’ latest creation goes back to the roots of the Technic Supercar franchise, without Power Functions, pneumatics, or a limited edition book.

Lego Technic Crowkillers Scorpion Supercar

Instead Crowkillers has focussed on mechanical functionality, and in doing so he’s created a wonderfully functional model. Suspension is independent on all wheels with an in-board pushrod set-up, there’s a mid-mounted V8 engine connected to a sequential 4-speed gearbox driving all four wheels, plus working steering, opening doors, engine cover and luggage space.

Lego Technic Crowkillers Scorpion Supercar

There’s more to see of Crowkillers’ ‘Scorpion’ Supercar via his Brickshelf gallery and the Eurobricks discussion forum, plus you can read our interview with Crowkillers as part of the Master MOCers series by clicking here.

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Build-Your-Own

Lego Porsche 911 Convertible

We were very excited when we first broke the news of LEGO’s brilliant-looking 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 set, especially when TLCB anoraks deciphered that it would feature a working paddle-shift gearbox. Unfortunately the reality of 42056 – especially that much hyped gearbox – hasn’t lived up to the sky-high expectations that preceded it, a fact made all to clear here at TLCB. So what if you’d like a Technic Porsche that doesn’t cost the earth and that works? Well handily we have two answers for you today…

First up (above) is paave’s fantastic 964 series 911 cabriolet. With working steering, a flat-6 engine, and opening doors, hood and engine cover, paave’s creation has everything you’d expect to find in a small Technic set, and to these eyes it looks better than the official 42056 product too. You can see more of this excellent build on both MOCpages and Eurobricks via these links.

Second (below) is Horcik Designs‘ effort, and it too looks a fine home-brewed attempt at bettering LEGO’s official 911 GT3 set. With working steering, a flat-6 engine, a functioning gearbox, all-wheel independent suspension, a working clutch, and a pneumatically adjustable rear spoiler Horcik’s creation is what LEGO’s could have been if they hadn’t spent so much money on a fancy booklet for collectors (who won’t open the box anyway so it’s wasted on them). There’s more to see of Horcik’s Porcshe 911 on Flickr at the link above, and you can check out a very disgruntled review rant of the official LEGO Technic 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 set by clicking here.

Lego Technic Porsche 911

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Not A Review

Lego Technic Porsche 911 GT3RS Review

When the previews for the ‘Ultimate’ Technic 42056 Porsche were circulating, I was certain that I’d buy one, as a Lego fan and petrolhead; even though I’m not overly fond of the Volkswagen Beetle Sport…. a review was promised in short order.

Well, here it isn’t – for a couple of reasons.

First, LEGO pulled it from sale before it was even offered, to fix a packaging problem we were told. If by packaging problem they mean packaging an errata sheet in the instructions… We will see. It seems the massive weight of that doorstop  sized coffee table book was crushing the boxes around it.

Second, early reviews were not encouraging, highlighting a number of reasons why this isn’t really ‘Ultimate’ in anything but price.

Technically, the steering and suspension are identical to the 42039 Le Mans car. No fancy tricks, just the basics. I don’t really care about the colour of the springs if the geometry is nothing like the real car… The flat six engine is bog standard and completely hidden. There’s plenty of space back there to have a go at modelling camshafts, say, but no attempt was made at anything above the ordinary.

Likewise, no attempt was made at any kind of rear wheel steering, a notable feature of the real 911 GT3RS. The only technical aspect that shows any ambition is the gearbox, more on which in a bit… So, if you want the ultimate Lego Technic car, stick to your 8880.

What about that much heralded build experience? It’s an idea that’s appeared before, in the 8448, which does the modularity thing a whole lot better. Since I haven’t (and probably won’t unless 42056 appears at a steep discount) built the Porsche, the jury will have to stay out on that one.

Ultimate packaging maybe? It would be if the box had a strong plastic insert to sort the pieces into and lots of pictures of alternate builds. For that, you’ll need an 853. I do understand what they mean by the ‘premium experience’ of the Porsche but like a lot of things, the word ‘premium’ just means you pay more.

Ultimate looks?

LEGO Technic 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS

It is pretty, and the orange (close-but-no-cigar to the real Porsche’s ‘lava orange’ colour) does look good. But with its awkward gaps around the headlights and taillights, messy interior and clumsy rear end is it as pretty as the Creator Ferrari F40? Not to these eyes.

Now then, that gearbox, surely that must be the most impressive such thing in a Lego car?

If you like your changing up sequence to be 1-3-2-4 and lots of friction, then yes. A lot of said friction can apparently be blamed on this little fella:

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It’s a small bevel gear assembly built in the very early stages, and the problem is that pin joiner, used as a spacer. Change it for a couple of bushes and it’s fine. Expect that to be instruction errata number 1. According to Sariel’s review on Eurobricks, there are twenty gears engaged in first gear; so don’t expect that to completely solve the friction problem. Now we know why the white clutch gear was included in the powertrain…

As for the shift sequence, this can be corrected by swapping a 12T double bevel and a 16T spur gear on the back of the gearbox, which suggests a simple error in the instructions. Or it would if LEGO hadn’t tried to tell us it was ‘to reduce friction and enhance the premium experience’ or some such tosh. According to everyone who’s built one, the positions of these gears makes no difference to the friction. That’ll be errata number 2.

If these two problems are solved – and they should be when it becomes available again – this gearbox will be an impressive feat, for all that you can still change up from 4 back to 1 and have four reverse gears. That sounds like fun. Finally, it’s possible to drive a 911 as if its engine is in the right place. Backwards…

So it might actually be the ultimate gearbox. £250 is a lot to pay for a gearbox.

Hang on a sec, it’s got a handbag as well, so there’s that… it’d better be a Hermes…

Lego Technic 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Review

Sorry LEGO. I know you tried. The idea for an ‘Ultimate’ series of Technic models is a great one which should produce something fantastic that we’ll all love. It’s just that 42056 isn’t it. It feels like the product of two partners with conflicting priorities, rather like the McLaren-Mercedes SLR; when the 8880 felt like LEGO’s McLaren F1

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LEGO Technic 42056 – Porsche 911 GT3 RS Set Preview

Lego Technic 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Review

IT’S HERE! LEGO Technic’s incredible 1:8 Porsche 911 GT3 RS, scooped here earlier in the year, has been officially unveiled!

Officially licensed by Porsche, 42056 is one of the largest and most complex sets ever released by the Technic line, featuring over 2,700 pieces and aimed at ages 16+.

Unlike the first spy-shots of this set, the final production version drops its camouflage paint-work as we expected and now wears a gloriously bright orange hue. 42056 also debuts several new pieces not seen before, rides on unique replica Porsche wheels and wears authentic Porsche decals throughout.

Lego Technic 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Review

The building process has been designed to mirror the way the real car is manufactured, which is an interesting variation from the usual Technic construction process, and each model contains a collectors’ book and an individual serial number, which means we fully expect many of these sets will sit forever unopened in the hands of speculators (boo).

That’s a shame, because 42056 contains some fabulous engineering which has raised the bar in terms of what can be expected from an official LEGO product.

Alongside the usual working steering, suspension and piston engine there is a functioning double-clutch gearbox complete with steering-wheel mounted paddles, just like the PDK transmission used on the real car – something our in-house engineers cautiously hoped for when they dissected the very first teaser image of this set back in January. With four speeds operable from the steering wheel we’re expecting some rubberised or elasticated witchcraft from LEGO’s design department, and it could be the most inventive function added to an official LEGO set in decades.

Opening doors, engine lid, glovebox and trunk all feature, as does Porsche branded luggage and a fully detailed interior with racing seats.

Available from June this year, we’re already saving up to get our hands on 42056 (unless anyone at LEGO is willing to give us a copy!), and we anticipate an RRP of around $300/£250.

Lego 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS Set

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Koenigsegg One:1 – Picture Special

Lego Koenigsegg One:1 Supercar

This breathtaking creation is a Koenigsegg One:1, Sweden’s twin-turbocharged, 1,300bhp, rumoured 270mph, 1:1 bhp:kg ultra-rare hypercar. It’s the work of Pvdb, and it’s one of the greatest Technic supercars that we’ve ever posted.

Pvdb has replicated the Koenigsegg One:1’s technical specifications beautifully, including its amazing dihedral doors, complex suspension and V8 engine, but the real work of art is his working paddle-shift gearbox.

Lego Technic Koenigsegg One:1

Pvdb has squeezed three ratios into his Technic paddle-shift, but even being four cogs short of the real One:1 it’s an accomplishment that has blown the collective minds of TLCB office. If we’re right about LEGO’s forthcoming 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS set also including a working paddle-shift gearbox it’ll be interesting to see how many ratios LEGO themselves have managed to engineer into their new flagship.

You can read further details of how Pvdb’s system works via the Eurobricks discussion forum here, where you can also see the dihedral doors in action and peruse an extensive gallery of images.

Lego Technic Koenigsegg One:1 Supercar

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