Tag Archives: Competition

Group of the ‘Month’ – Lego Speeder Bikes

Lego Speeder Bikes

Yes we know, the ‘month’ bit of this post’s title is ridiculous. We can’t even remember the last time we did one of these and we really don’t fancy stepping into the dark and foreboding Archives Hall to find out. There’s a long-lost band of Elves in there who have turned quite ferrel.

Anyway, today we are featuring a group from the online Lego Community because it’s a rather cool one. Flickr’s Lego Speeder Bikes (LSB) have been showcasing small sci-fi builds since 2009 and now number over 1,000 members. They’re currently running neat contest too, inviting you to design and build a speeder bike for the fictitious ‘District 18’, with four categories to choose from.

Prizes include the very cool-looking Dredd-inspired ‘Vice Hoverbike’ from _zenn above, as well as some official LEGO sets too. The closing date for entries is March 4th, and if you’ve never thought about entering a Lego competition before this could the perfect way to start – as piece count comes very much second to creativity.

Take a look at the Lego Speeder Bikes group on Flickr by clicking here, where you can also find all the details of the District 18 competition, and we may return at the end of the contest with a round-up of the best entries.

Lego Speeder Bikes

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And the Winner is…

The Lego Car Blog Competition

The Lego Car Blog’s Review My Set Competition drew to a close last week, and it’s added a whole host of reader-written LEGO set reviews to our burgeoning Set Review Library! Almost 100 individual LEGO sets and third-party products have now been reviewed in total, and we aim to keep this number climbing as the Set Review Library is the single highest viewed page here at TLCB.

We were seriously impressed by the standard of your review submissions, which ranged from LEGO’s most expensive flagships right down to pocket-money sets, and were written by experienced adults and young builders alike.

So how did you guys do? Well it was close. Really close. But we’re delighted to announce that the overall winners are…

Winner

Andrea Lattanzio  |  5591 Model Team Red Bird

 

Runner-Up

Rage Hobbit  |  8070 Technic Supercar

Yup, whilst we said there would only be one winner it really was too close to call, especially if you’re as indecisive as we are, so the assorted loot here at TLCB Towers will be shared amongst both winners!

Lego 5591 Mach II Red Bird

Andrea’s review of the classic 1995 Model Team flagship recorded one of the highest view counts in its first week, and also included bespoke images created by Andrea specifically for his review article.

Rage Hobbit’s entry reviewing the 2011 Technic Supercar flagship accrued the most views over the duration of the competition, and the writing was so in-keeping with our in-house reviewers we could probably have passed it off as our own.

Andrea and Rage weren’t alone at the top though, as many reviewers really impressed us with their writing ability (and subsequent view count), to the point where we’d like to have you on staff!

Congratulations to Andrea and Rage, to all of you who saw your Set Review/s successfully published here at The Lego Car Blog, and if you’d like to write a review for a set that is currently missing from the review archive we’d still love to receive it! Simply get in touch us letting us know the set you’d like to critique and you could see your writing appear here for over one million viewers a year!

Lego Set Reviews Prizes

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Halt the Hits!

Lego Review My Set Competition

The Lego Car Blog Review My Set Competition closed to entries on December 31st and there are just 24 hours for entrants to squeeze in a few more hits before we total up the views and go to the judges to determine a winner! You can see all of the Reader Reviews that were successful in being published in the Set Review Library, good luck to all the competition entrants, and remember that views received after today will not count!

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Review My Set Competition – Now Closed!

TLCB Review My Set

Running over the past 6 months or so we’ve been asking you, our readers, to submit your reviews of LEGO sets that you thought should be in the Set Review Library. We’ve published loads of your entries (which can read by clicking the link above) and we now have the tough job of shortlisting, via the view count figures, those who will go to the judges’ vote.

Some say we only embarked on this exercise to increase the Set Review Library’s stock without paying anyone. And they’d be right. But we do have prizes up for grabs, made up of the loot that we have acquired here in TLCB Towers over the past year.

We’ll be announcing the winner of the aforementioned swag in the New Year, in the meantime a huge thank you to all those who have entered the competition, and if you’d like to submit a review for the Set Review Library here at The Lego Car Blog you still can (only you won’t win anything). If you have good written English and creative writing skills then get in touch!

Lego Set Reviews Prizes

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Last Chance to Win!

TLCB LEGO Set Reviews

The Lego Car Blog Set Review Competition has just a few short weeks remaining! We’ve asked you, our readers, to join us to add even more LEGO sets to the Set Review Library, and those that made the grade have seen their words published here reaching over a million readers annually!

If you’d like to add your own set to our Set Reviews and be in with a chance of winning some awesome prizes then get in touch via the comments – but be quick as the competition closes December 31st!

Still up for grabs are several superb Lego books from the great guys at No Starch Press, including the 5-star rated Tiny Lego Wonders, and the brilliant Manner-Spielzeug Mad Max Interceptor set, making a prize pot worth over $130!

You can read all of the Set Reviews submitted so far, as well as those written by our in-house reviewers, by visiting The Lego Car Blog Set Review Library here, and we’ll announce the winner (based on a combination of views and a judges’ vote) in early 2017.

Lego Set Reviews Prizes

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TLCB Needs You!

Lego Set Reviews

Yes, we need help from you, our wonderful readers, to increase the population of the Set Review Library!

We’re looking new writers to review official LEGO sets for The Lego Car Blog, and in doing so you’ll be part of a site that reaches over a million people per year!

To add your Set Review to TLCB all you need to do is contact us, either here or via Flickr Message, and let us know the set that you think should be included in the Review Library. It can be a set you love, a set you hate, or one in the middle!

Prizes!

Lego Set Reviews Prizes

As if reviewing your chosen LEGO set for over million annual readers and becoming part of one of the best set review resources on the web wasn’t enough, you could also win some neat loot!

We’re sent lots of great stuff here at TLCB to review, and as we want your help to add content to the Review Library we’re going to pass on some of the items that we’ve, er… reviewed to one of you. Simple huh?

One reviewer will be chosen to receive a goodie bag full of the lovely stuff above, including the newly released and five star rated Tiny Lego Wonders book, the brilliant Manner-Spielzeug Mad Max Interceptor kit, and the stunning Art of Lego Scale Modeling book too. In all it’s a prize pot currently worth over $130!

To read the full details of how a winner will be selected click on the link below, and you can read some of the brilliant Reader Reviews that have been published so far by clicking here.

Click here for Competition Details!

Please note that we’ll be collating this next round of Review requests and thus it may take us some time to respond to you if you’d like to participate. Don’t worry, even if it takes a little while we will let you know about your application!

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42035 Mining Truck Review

Lego Technic 42035 Mining Truck Review

After prompting the wrath of pneumatics fans following his controversial Set Review last month (and meeting TLCB Elves, which can be just as perilous), Thirdwigg has returned to join us here at TLCB Towers to add another official LEGO set to the burgeoning Set Review Library. Over to Thirdwigg to explain…

Most of the sets I buy now happen after months of deliberation, intense community scrutinization, and reading every online review I can find. And usually during double VIP months at LEGO.com.

Not this one. I went to the local toy store in a moment of children-induced weakness, purchased this cute little dump truck, and went home and started building it right away.

The box of 42035 is smallish, but the weight of it conveys a $30 set more than the size does. Upon opening the box, you’ll find a couple of bags of parts, a small sticker sheet, and wrapped instructions for both the A and B model.

As I started sorting the contents I found some of the new or rare parts that attracted me to the set. First, the new panels are pretty fun. Basically, they are a 5×11 panel with a 9×2 triangle removed. They are robust, and have an empty center; both sides of the panel are flat and can be presented to the outside of a model. Second, are the newish tires. They were part of the reason I was interested in this set, as I wanted to try them out in some MOCs, as their size fills a nice hole in Technic wheels range. Third, there are a smattering of new unique and/or interesting parts, like a piston and cylinder and the 3L pin with 1L axle.

Lego Technic 42035 Review

The build starts with the chassis, and before you are 8 steps in, you ask yourself “why no differential?” I’ve stopped trying to answer questions that start with “why did LEGO not do_____?” Now I just change it myself when I am done. Continue reading

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8069 Backhoe Loader Review

Lego Technic 8069 Backhoe Review

PC or Mac? Ford or GM? Edward or Jacob? These are the questions that have dominated our age. However since 2008 a new and even more important choice has arisen, one that has conflicted the minds of academics and that has caused lifelong friends to stop talking. So… Linear Actuators or Pneumatics?

Thirdwigg, returning to TLCB for his second Reader Review (and risking ostracisation by half of the online Lego Community), is brave enough to make his case…

Bias alert: in the Linear Actuator vs. Pneumatics debate I am conclusively in the former group. Feel free to send your “dear idiot letters” to thirdwigg.com, I can handle it. After the release of the Large Linear Actuators (LA) from 8295 and 8294, it was clear to me they were an improvement over pneumatics. They had a simple design, better integration with Power Functions and manual controls, actual mid-range control, and no clunky hoses to connect and manage in your model. But I still felt like something was missing after the LAs. Something shorter, smaller. When we first got teasers images of 8069 I was excited. Did it have what I was looking for?

Like most sets, this one comes in a box. You have to open it. It has parts in it. 609. And it costs $60. The tyres, buckets and stickers are loose in the box, along with two loose instruction manuals for the A model. B model instructions are online. All you need to know about new parts in 8069 is that it is the first set that included Mini Linear Actuators (mLA). You get four of them. You also get two yellow panels (they are kind of rare, it turns out), the buckets, lots of gears, yellow parts, and the mLAs. They are great. Great.

The build starts with the chassis and the front steering, then quickly onto building a worm gear submodel. “What’s this” you think? It’s for the bucket tilt. We’ll come back to this. Two mLAs are used to provide the bucket lift. Then off to the rear, where you start building a complex structure of gears for the rear bucket. The design is good, and teaches many gear structures including worm and bevel gearing. It also offers a great lesson on how to build good cross supporting structures in Technic when the rear supports are added.

You then build the cabin, which has some nice details. Next all the rear backhoe controls placed on the top and the backhoe is added with a neat little design for the two stages of movement utilizing two of the mLAs. Finally the fenders are added, the front bucket is placed, you add the wheels, and you are done.

Lego Technic 8069 Backhoe Loader

The finished 8069 model has a lot of functions; steering, bucket lift, bucket tilt, backhoe slew, backhoe arm, backhoe bucket, and rear stabilizers. For a set of this size it’s an impressive list. How well do they work? Better than pneumatics (zing!). The steering is light, and the turning radius is stunning (Hurrah! Ed.), especially if you take out the ¾ pins in the steering. You might bump the hood a bit on full lock, but it’s worth it. The bucket lift is excellent – it’s strong, and the controls are easy to use. The range of motion is good; though a little more height would be welcome. Continue reading

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8081 Extreme Cruiser Review

Lego Technic 8081 Extreme Cruiser Set Review

The Lego Car Blog Set Review Library is packed with over seventy sets, but we want mooooah! This is where you come in, as we’re looking for TLCB readers to add their own sets to the Review Library, and in doing so you could even win some loot! You also get to become a TLCB writer for the day, with literally none of the privileges that you’d expect this to offer you. Still, this hasn’t put off friend of TLCB Thirdwigg, who has joined us here at TLCB Towers to add one of his favourite sets to the Review Library. Yes, we said favourite. We’ll let Thirdwigg explain…

8081 Extreme Cruiser gets a bad rap. It’s not extreme. It’s not a 4×4. It has a funny engine. It’s black. On and on it goes. Blah Blah Blah.

I love it.

But it took me some time. When I bought it for $60 through LEGO, I tagged it onto my 8110 order as an afterthought. I was decidedly more excited about 8110. After 8110, I got to work on 8081. Opening the box, you find a number of bags, wheels and tires, and a number of loose instructions books (ugh). There are a lot of black parts, and some red parts, but the set really has no new parts among the 590 included. However some interesting pieces include the newer frames, four pistons and cylinders, suspension parts, a bunch of black panels. There are also instructions included for a B Model. You’ll like A better.

The builds starts with the frame of the 4×4. LEGO uses red for the chassis, which seems silly at this point. You add the knob gears for the steering, and add the rear suspension. The suspension is a single pivot design like we saw in the car from 8042. But there is a differential (clap, clap), and the structure is solid. We can let it slide. You then build the engine and the front suspension. You build a V4?! What is this, a motorcycle? Then the front suspension. Independent setup with no drive?! On an Extreme Cruiser? Who named this set?

Yep, no four wheel drive, and an anemic engine.

The bodywork comes next with the second bag, and the model is finished with bag three. Redemption for 8081 is starting. The structure is solid and cohesive. The black works well, and the execution comes together as the Technic panels fill gaps and lead your eyes to a quite a pleasing overall shape. The hood is long, as is the roofline, and 8081’s stance looks great; balanced and not too heavy. The tires fill out the wheel wells appropriately. The doors, hood, and tailgate all open – simple, nice features to include. The blue seats are basic, yet they look good and compliment the aforementioned red, which highlights the chassis well.

Lego 8081 Extreme Cruiser

When it’s all done you cannot help but like the cute little SUV. Continue reading

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Nice Pair

Lego Technic Porsche 911

This glorious Porsche 911 wide-body racer is part of the current LEGO ReBrick competition. Built by previous bloggee jorgeopesi it’s true Technic supercar, featuring working suspension, a flat-6 engine, all-wheel-drive and all-wheel-steering, and it looks… well it looks like that. Bloody brilliant. There’s more to see at the jorgeopesi’s Rebrick page – click the link above to see more on ReBrick, or here for the Brickshelf gallery.

The second part of today’s Porsche pairing comes from newcomer Jacob Lockett and is also built for LEGO’s ReBrick Porsche competition. Jacob has chosen to recreate one of Porsche’s rarest and most interesting cars, the mid ’60s flat-4 engined 904. Despite only having four cylinders and a two litre capacity, the 904 made almost 200bhp, and that was way back in 1964! Even today that’s a good figure for a two litre 4-cylinder. Jacob’s Technic recreation features working suspension, functioning steering, and a replica flat-4 piston engine. There’s more to see via ReBrick – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Technic Porsche 904

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8845 Technic Dune Buggy Review

Lego Technic 8845

We’re great fans of free labour here at TLCB. It’s why we employ unpaid mythical creatures to scour the internet for the best Lego creations, and it’s also part of the reason for the The Lego Car Blog’s Set Review Competition! Yup, we want your opinions on some of the official LEGO sets not yet part of the Set Review Library! – Only not enough to pay you for them.

Anyhow, previous bloggee Nils O has decided that the lack of pay won’t stop him, and thus he joins us here at TLCB Towers to review something a little older than the sets we usually feature. Over to Nils…

The 8845 Dune Buggy was not one of the big Supercar sets, but for me in 1981 it was one of the coolest. It had “only” 174 parts, so with a few weeks of saving the pocket money it was even affordable for us kids. After the first more or less “brick built” Technic sets it was part of the 2nd generation which included some extremely cool parts.

8845 contained a completely new and more compact steering mechanism, a roll cage with new “ratchet” connectors, and – yes! – suspension struts for the rear suspension. The car was so cool with all those functions, I played with it for weeks.

As usual there were also instructions for an alternate model, in this case a more or less strange Dragster. Yes, it had a long wheelbase, a steering and a roll cage, but it had no suspension and was quite ugly, so the main model was rebuilt quite quickly. There were also instructions to motorise the main model, but also without rear suspension, so I didn’t build that version.

Lego 8845 Review

The best way for me to have fun was modifying the set. A HOG steering, for example, was easy to add. With a longer steering column, a second Cardan joint, an axle and a spare tire on the rear end it was done. Today I would add a third 16 teeth gear in the front to add a second, more or less hidden, steering column, but back in 1981 the two (then new) 16 teeth gears from the set were the only ones I had. Continue reading

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8070 Technic Supercar Review

Lego Technic 8070 Review

The Lego Car Blog Review My Set Competition is underway! Today we’re joined by MOCpages’ Rage Hobbit, who has donned TLCB Reviewing Anorak in order to pen a review of one of his favourite sets. Over to Rage…

The 8070 Supercar from 2011. This car had a lot to live up to.

As part of the Technic Supercar flagship series that started all the way back with the 8880, this set had to try and live up to high expectations and even higher hopes. Was it truly the successor to the acclaimed 8448 Super Street Sensation?

Mostly yes. Sort of.

Differences between this car and its predecessors become evident upon opening the box. This is no old-fashioned Technic set; there’s hardly a single studded beam to be found. I’m sure some people liked this change, others probably hated it, but no amount of pointless arguing will change the fact that this is the way Technic is going to stay.

This retinue of studless pieces is found in several unnumbered bags sprawled inside a rather empty box. Don’t ask me how many bags; they didn’t seem all that special and as such I threw them out moments after opening the set. The three instruction booklets – ranging from 50 to 80 pages – are packed neatly into a plastic bag, along with a cardboard plate so that the booklets don’t get beat up during transit. It’s a nice touch, and something that LEGO should revisit. As per the usual, no B-model instructions are to be found inside the box; they’re found exclusively online *sigh*. LEGO should get the point eventually.

The wheels and hubs are free-floating inside the box, with the electronic components – a Power Functions battery box and M-motor – packaged individually. Tear everything open, dump it all in a big pile, and you’re ready to build.

The build process is fairly engaging yet still pretty simple as compared to more recent Technic sets. Starting with the distribution transmission for the M-motor, you add the rear axle and chassis frame rails before moving on to booklet number 2 and all the other stuff. Some of the aesthetic portions can be a bit of a drag, but overall it’s a good build.

Lego Technic 8070 Supercar Review

Let’s start with the functions and features. The car rolls very nicely, with the rear wheels driving a V8 piston engine found under the front hood. At this point, supercar snobs will complain along the lines of “It needs a V10!” and “REAL supercars have V12s”, but the V8 suits the scale of the car well. Dual-wishbone independent suspension (a little bit too hard on the rear wheels, with decent travel all-around) is found on all wheels, with the front ones steered through a hand-of-god knob behind the cabin. Steering lock is only okay, but I won’t complain too much.

The 4 main functions of this car are controlled by a distribution transmission found in between the seats where it should be. The solitary M-motor in the set drives the transmission by way of a clutch gear so that you don’t break anything.

The first of the functions is the deployable rear wing. The function works fine, but the mechanism leaves an ugly gap in the rear aesthetics, and the wing looks a bit half-baked. Tip the switch to the other side, and the hood starts to open through a neat and effective linkage mechanism that emulates the kind of thing found in real supercars. The other two functions on the transmission are reserved for the doors, which is also my very favorite function. The doors open individually on a butterfly-ish hinge; a function which works flawlessly and doesn’t compromise the aesthetics. Overall, kudos to LEGO for the functions on this car. Continue reading

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Review Your Set for TLCB & Win!

Lego Set Reviews

Is The Lego Car Blog Set Review Library missing your favourite LEGO set? Or a set that you think really ought to be reviewed to warn prospective buyers? If so, The Lego Car Blog Set Review Library needs YOU!

We’re looking for funny, articulate writers to review LEGO sets for TLCB, and in doing so you’ll be part of a site that reaches over a million people per year!

To add your Set Review to TLCB all you need to do is contact us, either here or via Flickr Message, and let us know the set in question.

Prizes!

Lego Set Reviews Prizes

Yup! As if reviewing your set for over million annual readers and becoming part of the coolest Lego Blog there is* wasn’t enough, you could also win some awesome loot!

We’re sent lots of great stuff here at TLCB to review, and as we want your Reviews we’re going to pass on some of the items that we’ve, er… reviewed. Simple huh?

One Reviewer will be chosen to receive a goodie bag full of the lovely stuff above, including the newly released and five star rated Tiny Lego Wonders book, the brilliant Manner-Spielzeug Mad Max Interceptor kit, and the stunning Art of Lego Scale Modeling book too. In all it’s a prize pot currently worth over $130!

To read the full details of how a winner will be selected click on the link below, and we’ll be publishing the first Set Reviews submitted to us and cleared for publication soon!

Click here for Competition Details!

*We measured this by polling the Elves. So maybe not…

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One Hundred Ways To Win!

Lego LUGNuts Competition

Hello LEGO Car Blog readers! Lino Martins here. Aside from being the outspoken front man and taskmaster over at LUGNuts, I have been a lot of things in my day: wine enthusiast, chubby chaser, mob informant, Pulitzer Prize winner, True Belieber, drug mule, part-time figure drawing model, prison snitch, gun-nut, cheese monger, interim fluffer, Olympic gold medalist, and backup dancer…but I have never been a writer for The LEGO Car Blog. Which is why that, thanks to a serious lapse in someone’s judgement (probably the Elves), I am honored that they let me take over the blog for this one post.

Now it’s about to get a bit more lowbrow around here and they probably won’t get the damage deposit back on this rental blog-writing studio, but I can assure you this is all for good reason. For all of February, LUGNuts will be running our 100th challenge called “100 Ways To Win”…a challenge so epic, we went back in time to 1582 to convince astronomers to give us one more day in this otherwise very short month. It’s totally true. I wouldn’t just make that up. We have a physicist who does that kind of stuff.

Anyway, how this works is you go on over to LUGNuts, (read the rules and whatnot), choose a number from 1-100 and, based on your chosen number, we will assign you an automotive task from a list of ideas that we have under lock and key. You build accordingly, play your cards right, and you may take home a totally awesome prize.

Over at LUGNuts, in life, and sometimes in the bathroom, we live by one policy: go big or go home! An epic challenge calls for epic prizes so the third place winner gets the LEGO Technic 42050 Drag Racer. Second place winner; we up the ante with the Technic 42039 24 Hours LeMans Race Car. For the first place winner we pull out all the stops with the Technic 42030 Remote-Controlled Volvo L350F Wheel Loader. Also, all three winners will get an autographed copy of The Art of LEGO Modeling, courtesy of Dennis Glaasker, Dennis Bosman and No Starch Press. I’m pretty sure winning a totally epic prize from a LUGNuts challenge will get you laid. (Claim void if you happen to be a youngin, live in Idaho, or if your belly protrudes from under your billowing renaissance fair shirt.)

How do we afford such huge prizes? We had a little help from our sponsors and friends at The Brothers-Brick, Constructibles, and the LUGNuts admins. Plus the judge ruled in my favor during that whole cheese mongering fiasco so I don’t have to worry about posting bail. What, did you think my brief stint as a drug mule would get me busted? Oh, HELL NO!

So head on over to LUGNuts to see what we have in store this February! Thanks, LEGO Car Blog for letting me use your blog-writing studio. Oh, and if some Chinese dudes in a van tell you I sold them fake Viagra, don’t believe them. Also cool water and salt will take the wine stains out of the carpet. Just sayin’.

Sign up for your chance to win!

Lego Competition

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TLCB Summer Building Competition Round-Up

TLCB Summer Building Competition

TLCB Summer Building Competition prizes are on their way to the Winners this week, but before we say goodbye to our first building competition our partners at LUGnuts have written an amusing* round-up of the entries submitted via their Flickr group.

Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 09.36.37

You can check out LUGnuts’ assessment of the brilliant competition entries submitted via Flickr by clicking here.

LUGnuts

*Slightly adult content warning!

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