Tag Archives: Forklift

I’m Blue*

Is today’s post just so that we can link to that infernal Italian song so it gets stuck in your head too? Yes. Yes it is. But the model within it is also excellent. In fact, it’s five models, as not only has previous bloggee Arian Janssens constructed this ultra realistic DAF FAN CF 530 Space Cab truck, there’s a trailer, two swappable ‘canvas’ sided bodies with their own support legs, and a trailer-mounted forklift truck too

An extensive gallery of images is available via Flickr that shows all five components in more detail, and you can take a look at all the blue via the link above. Da-ba-dee da-ba-di. Dammit!

*Today’s title song. Of course.

Fork This

We all need a little lift now and again, and that’s what we have here. Built in ‘Miniland’ scale, newcomer Joey Klusnick‘s Hyster forklift captures the real deal brilliantly, alongside which it’s pictured too. Fork your way over to Flickr for all the photos.

Fork This

This a motorised forklift truck, it comes from previous bloggee Vladimir Drozd, and it is quite good at squashing Elves.

With a number of our smelly little workers distracted by something shiny, the Elven discoverer of this creation snuck up and dropped a box on them. Because it could.

Doubtless a victim of past smushings, it enjoyed being the perpetrator immensely, and is now happily eating an orange Smartie whilst we patch up the victims.

A pair of Power Functions motors raise and tilt the forklift boom (enabling a brick built box to tip smartly onto those underneath), whilst a further two motors drive and steer the truck itself, and there’s more to see at both Flickr, Eurobricks, and via the video below.

YouTube Video

 

What a Load…

Loading. Reloading. Unloading. All the loadings are excellent. At least according to mahjqa and his co-conspirators.

This is mahjqa’s lovely Model Team / Technic truck, and it is – as you’d expect from a TLCB Master MOCer and motion-making extraordinaire – fully remote controlled, right down to the ‘fifth wheel’ trailer hitch.

Of course mahjqa didn’t stop there though, devising a fiendishly tricky competition in which Lego trucks such as this one, plus trailers and ingenious little RC forklifts all operate to, well… move stuff about rather pointlessly.

In the words of the creator, it’s “ten minutes of bad manoeuvring, dropped cargo, and unprofessional commentary”, which definitely sounds like our kind of contest film.

Take a look via the video below, and you can see more of mahjqa’s entry at his Flickr album and at the Eurobricks discussion forum via these links.

YouTube Video

Forked from Behind

This is a Renault Magnum, famous for being the squarest object in the known universe. It comes from Damian Z (aka Thietmaier), and whilst it’s excellent, what’s more interesting is the dropside trailer and trailer-mounted forklift behind it.

Such set-ups are commonplace in Europe, with the forklift sometimes cleverly doubling as the rear lights, number plate holder, and bumper of the trailer.

Damian’s forklift is a Moffett M4, and it’s as beautifully built as both the trailer that it rides upon and the truck that pulls it.

There’s lots more to see of Damian’s superbly presented Magnum/Moffett combination at his ‘Renault Magnum AE’ album on Flickr, where further details (including the rather neat pallets and their patio tile cargo) can be found. Click the link above for a good rear forking.

Batlift Truck

Ever wondered how Batman moves all his stuff around the Batcave? No, us neither, but Pasq67 has.

Cue Batman’s Fenwick forklift truck, which – considering it only operates out of sight in the Batcave – has been unnecessarily restyled to make it more Batty.

It also appears to be used only to transport large quantities of brooms (Batbrooms?) for some reason, but we know very little about comic book superheroes so who are we to argue.

See more on Flickr via the link!

A Good Forking

It’s not all super cars and drag racers here at The Lego Car Blog. Mostly, but not all.

This is Shimon‘s remote control Technic forklift, and it’s excellent. A suite of Power Functions motors deliver drive, steering, lift raising/lowering, and tilt, with the latter two clutched to ensure smooth operation.

Half a kilogram can be lifted, which equates to about four TLCB Elves by our experiments, and there’s more of the model to see on Eurobricks. Get forked via the link above.

Stacking Votes

This is a Toyota Stacker, or ‘Forklift Truck’ as it’s known here at TLCB, and it’s been built rather brilliantly in Model Team form by recent previous bloggee Andre Pinto.

As the U.S Election hangs on the postal votes yet to be counted, the ballots inside the containers carried by this forklift are off to the counting centre, where they could well decide the outcome. Or they could be heading for a river if Donald Trump has anything to do with it, claiming first that postal Republican votes were dumped there, and now – ironically – that we should cease counting and dump the uncounted postal votes.

Whoever ends up in the White House we’re glad we’re far, far away here in TLCB Towers.

There’s more to see of Andre’s excellent Toyota Stacker at both Flickr and Eurobricks. Open the containers and start counting via the links above.

Zoom Lion

Well this is has the best name of any vehicle we’ve ever posted! The SNSC ‘Zoomlion’ is not an ultra fast lion, but instead a fairly slow forklift truck (props to SNSC’s marketing department), recreated here in fully remote controlled Technic form by Danifill of Eurobricks.

Controlled and powered by a third-party BuWizz bluetooth battery, Danifill’s Zoomlion features motorised drive, steering and forklift elevation, plus a pneumatically controlled forklift pitch via two pneumatic cylinders supplied by an on-board compressor.

Click here to make the jump to the Eurobricks discussion forum where further images and a video of the Zoomlion zooming can be found.

Nice Cans*

Today’s model is a bit front heavy, what with those two heavy cans out front and a see-through top as well, but it sure looks good. Now that we’ve messed with the search engines and there are probably people viewing this who expected to see something rather different we can link you to builder de-marco‘s Flickr page. Click his name for more, including a link to instructions should you wish to build this Town forklift for yourself.

*Secret link.

Get Fork-D

The LEGO Technic 42082 Rough Terrain Crane has the highest piece count of any Technic model so far (although check back here later to see what’s about to eclipse it…) including multiple motors, linear actuators and gearbox parts, making it the perfect set for repurposing into something new. LEGO offer this themselves via the ‘B-Models’ that can be built from most Technic sets, and TLCB Master MOCer Nico71 has gone two steps further by designing both ‘C’ and ‘D’ Models from the parts found within the 42082 inventory.

Nico’s 42082 ‘C-Model’ appeared here last year and he’s now designed a further ‘D-Model’ that can be built solely from the parts found within the Rough Terrain Crane set.

Nico’s heavy duty forklift includes as many functions as the set from which its parts are taken, including a motorised tilting and raising/lowering fork, powered adjustable fork width, a tilting cabin, V6 piston engine, pendular suspension and working steering.

It’s a brilliant build, made even more so by the parts restriction inherent with being built from an existing set, and you can see full details, the complete gallery of images, and find building instructions at Nico71’s website by clicking here.

YouTube Video

Call out the Instigators

Lego Hover Forklift

Because there’s something in the air.
It’s got no wheels but a forklift.
And a mini-fig in the chair, and you know it’s right.

We’ve butchered one of the greatest classics of music there, but no matter – because what a neat creation we’ve done it with! Built by TLCB regular de-marco this hover forklift and hover loading bay work a treat, and we hope this combo foretells of more hovery creations to come. The revolution’s here.

Lego Hover Forklift

LEGO Technic H2 2018 | Set Previews

Lego Technic 42081 Volvo Concept

It’s that time of year again! With LEGO’s H2 Technic sets on the horizon the survivors from our crack team of Elves – sent to infiltrate The LEGO Company’s HQ – have returned to TLCB Towers with this summer’s bounty. So without further ado, here are the brand new Technic sets due to reach stores on August 1st!

42081 Volvo Autonomous Loader

OK, let’s get the weird one out of the way first. This is a Volvo autonomous loader concept and it is, frankly, one of the oddest Technic sets to appear in recent times. Continuing LEGO’s successful line of officially-licensed vehicles the new concept loader joins the previous (and excellent) Volvo Technic sets, but differs in that it isn’t a replica of a real-life Volvo at all. This makes it – in our eyes at least – utterly pointless.

Like many of LEGO’s recent Technic sets 42081 straddles the Model Team and Technic themes, bringing increased visual realism to functional models (only 42081 can’t be visually realistic because there is no real-world equivalent). All-wheel-steering, a mechanically raising and tipping bucket, and – for reasons we simply don’t understand – a model of a quadcopter drone are all included.

Expected to cost around $140 there are probably better ways to obtain 1,167 yellow and black pieces for your collection…

Lego Technic 42080 Forester

42080 Forest Harvester

This is more like it. Aimed at ages 10+ LEGO’s new 1,000-peice 42080 Forest Harvester set is the first to include Power Functions 2.0 (which may also mean the possibility of App control). We’ll have to wait until we get our hands on the new components to test out the upgrades, but the fact that the set also includes new pneumatics is cause for celebration!

We expect 42080 to use the new system to drive a pneumatic compressor that powers both the raising/lowering of the arm and the grabby/rolly/cutty thingumy on the end of it (which also looks to feature some new spiky round bricks). Mechanical functions are likely to include centre articulation and working steering, plus a little workbench and brick-built chainsaw are thrown in (somewhat unnecessarily) for good measure too.

We expect the brightly-coloured 42080 Forest Harvester set to cost around $150 when it reaches shelves later this year, which makes it $150 better value than that Volvo…

Lego Technic 42079 Forklift

42079 Forklift Truck

A staple feature throughout Technic’s long history, we’ve lost count of the number of forklift trucks in LEGO’s back-catalogue. The new set does appear to be one of the best though, and it could very well be the sweet-spot in the H2 Technic range. With Hand-of-God rear-wheel steering, a tilting fork, and an interesting-looking rope-activated lift mechanism, 42079 includes just enough mechanically-operated functionality to be interesting.

We think it looks rather nice too, with well-judged Model Team detailing, a few stickers teamed with a nice colour choice, and a bonus mystery barrel containing something dangerous. Aimed at ages 9+ 42079 is constructed from just under 600 pieces and is expected to cost around $70 when it reaches stores in August 2018.

https://thelegocarblog.com/2014/03/04/fork-off/

42082 Rough Terrain Crane

Now for the big one. This is 42082, LEGO’s 4,000+ piece, $300 flagship, and it’s massive. With the highest piece-count of any Technic set to date, plus Power Functions, 42082 is set to lift (hah!) the top tier of LEGO Technic even further towards engineering for adults.

An enormous extending boom (and it really is huge – the picture above shows it in its most compact setting), superstructure slew, boom raising/lowering and winch control are all driven electronically by LEGO’s Power Functions system, plus there are working outriggers, steering, and a V8 piston engine.

As with all of the new Technic sets 42082 will include instructions for a B-model, and it also features a wealth of stickers (each new set seems to include decals denoting the set no.) as part of a trend towards increasing the visual realism of Technic.

So there you have it, LEGO’s new-for-H2 2018 Technic sets. It’s quite a construction-heavy line-up, and one that we think is largely a decent effort. Apart from that pointless Volvo. Of course, the Volvo isn’t LEGO’s only officially-licensed new Technic set due for release later this year…

Little Forker

Lego Technic Forklift and Truck

A phrase often heard directed at a TLCB Elf by a member of the team, today the context is far more positive! This superb pairing of a forklift and pallet truck comes from Anto of Eurobricks, and they’re everything small-scale Technic models should be.

With Hand-of-God steering on both models, and Hand-of-God forklifting too, each model uses gears, levers and worm-drives in wonderful simplicity.

Anto’s builds are also reminiscent of the magnificent 8872 Technic set from 1993 which is reason enough to like them. We think they’d make great Technic starter sets and there’s more to see of each model at the Eurobricks forum via the link above.

Pallet Pushers

Lego Forkilfts

The Lego Car Blog Elves are not impressed today. Firstly because we’re blogging your finds via the Feedback and Submission Suggestions page, which means they don’t get fed, and secondly because this post features the most mundane vehicles known to man. The Mitsubishi Carisma excepted of course.

Mundane they may be, but material handlers like the ones built here by Flickr’s Andrea Lattanzio aka Norton74 are the backbone of modern society. Everything in your home, including that ‘hand carved’ wooden sculpture you bought from that stall you passed on holiday, will have been moved by one of these at some point in its journey from Indonesian sweatshop to you.

Norton’s neat mini-figure scale material handlers span everything from hand-operated trolly jacks to high-lift forklift stackers and were built as a commissioned piece for the German manufacturer of their real-life counterparts.

There are more scenes to see at Norton’s Flickr photostream – click the link above and step inside the warehouse.

Lego Forkilfts