Tag Archives: Forklift

Little Forker

Lego Technic Forklift and Truck

A phrase often heard directed at a TLCB Elf by a member of the team, today the context is far more positive! This superb pairing of a forklift and pallet truck comes from Anto of Eurobricks, and they’re everything small-scale Technic models should be.

With Hand-of-God steering on both models, and Hand-of-God forklifting too, each model uses gears, levers and worm-drives in wonderful simplicity.

Anto’s builds are also reminiscent of the magnificent 8872 Technic set from 1993 which is reason enough to like them. We think they’d make great Technic starter sets and there’s more to see of each model at the Eurobricks forum via the link above.

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Pallet Pushers

Lego Forkilfts

The Lego Car Blog Elves are not impressed today. Firstly because we’re blogging your finds via the Feedback and Submission Suggestions page, which means they don’t get fed, and secondly because this post features the most mundane vehicles known to man. The Mitsubishi Carisma excepted of course.

Mundane they may be, but material handlers like the ones built here by Flickr’s Andrea Lattanzio aka Norton74 are the backbone of modern society. Everything in your home, including that ‘hand carved’ wooden sculpture you bought from that stall you passed on holiday, will have been moved by one of these at some point in its journey from Indonesian sweatshop to you.

Norton’s neat mini-figure scale material handlers span everything from hand-operated trolly jacks to high-lift forklift stackers and were built as a commissioned piece for the German manufacturer of their real-life counterparts.

There are more scenes to see at Norton’s Flickr photostream – click the link above and step inside the warehouse.

Lego Forkilfts

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Big Forker

Lego Valmet TD 28-12 Forklift Truck

This blue behemoth is a Valmet TD 28-12 heavy-duty forklift, and it comes from probably the biggest company you’ve never heard of. Trading for over 200 years, Valmet are a Finnish manufacturer of, well… pretty much anything. Trains, trams, clocks, weaponry, aircraft, paper mills, cars, sauna thermometers, and – as here – tractors, are just some of the various products that the company has produced at one time or another. This huge forklift comes from Flickr’s Havoc, and it’s a fully operational engineering marvel. Forgoing the usual Power Functions motors, Havoc’s creation utilises pneumatics to power the forklift tilt, elevation and even variable fork-span. There are also working LED lights and Hand-of-God steering, and there’s more to see of this impressive machine on Flickr via the link above.

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Stack ‘Em High

Lego Technic Reach Stacker

We like featuring the unsung heroes of the automotive world here at TLCB. Today’s post is one of them, the humble reach stacker, used to retrieve and pile containers in thousands of depots the world over. The chances are that something you’re using or looking at right now was moved by one of these, and that makes it a more important vehicle than the Bugatti Veyron.

This neat Technic version of the humble automotive sherpa comes from previous bloggee Anto of Eurobricks, and it features rear-wheel steering, a lifting and extending arm complete with functioning clamp, and a working piston engine. There’s more to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum, and you can see LEGO’s own soon-to-be released reach stacker set as part of our 2017 Technic Preview by clicking here.

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Boxing Clever

Lego Warehouse

We’re used to featuring far more glamorous vehicles here at The Lego Car Blog, but the humble forklift and pallet trolley really do deserve your appreciation.

The vehicular backbone of modern society, everything in your possession – from the chair you’re sitting on to the device with which you’re reading these words – will have at some stage been lifted, lowered or moved by one of these little mechanised workhorses.

Entitled ‘Warehouse Life’, this superb recreation of the most humdrum of scenes comes from previous bloggee and TLCB Master MOCer Norton74, it was suggested to us by a reader, and you can see more of the build in detail by clicking here.

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31041 Construction Vehicles – Set Review

31041

Come with us on a journey as we review the cheapest set that The Lego Car Blog has ever examined. We thought that we’d have a change from the big Technic sets that usually feature here. At £3.49 (30% off) from amazon will our purchase prove to be value for money? How will it rate for fun and playability? Will the Elves eat most of the 64 pieces before we can use them? Read on…

Packaged in LEGO’s usual bright and attractive box, 31041 scores over a large Technic set by only requiring a strong thumb to open its cardboard tab. None of that cutting or ripping sticky tabs here. Collectors will obviously want to cut the packaging open with a sharp knife in order to preserve its collectability, in a manner similar to this video.  A recurring theme of our reviews is the need for parts to come in numbered bags in order to reduce confusion & sorting and to help make building more pleasurable. Sadly the bag of parts is not numbered, possible as there is only one.  On the up side, a quick flick through the 32 page instruction book reveals that it contains instructions for all three models. As we’ve mentioned in other reviews, it would be great it if LEGO did this for their big, expensive Technic sets too. At the moment, builders having to traipse off to Lego.com and download PDF files.

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Moving on to the build, the headline model is rapidly built in 14 pages. The construction is the conventional, studs up type. There’s nice use of commonplace bricks, such as 1×1 round bricks and headlight bricks with 1×1 round plates to give the detailing. There’s also the neat use of a 1×2 tile, at the centre of the model, which will make it easier for children to take apart and re-build (which is what LEGO is supposed to be for!). The backhoe is a conventional bit of building too but the front bucket and its arms, are a good example of economical use of parts to good effect.

Builders young and old can learn quite a bit from this tiny model. As with short stories when compared with novels, micro-scale builds force modellers to consider each and every brick carefully. With model completed, you’re left with a spare 1×1 trans-orange round plate, a dark grey clip arm and three 1×1 light grey round plates to shovel around.

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In terms of functionality, this is a strong build, which rolls well across a floor or table. Sadly it suffers from the usual problem in LEGO vehicles of having poor Ackerman steering geometry. This is probably due to it having no steering but let’s skate over that one. Both buckets are firmly attached to the body of the tractor and have good ranges of movement. It’s a bit tricky to keep the grey plates on the front bucket, though this can be improved by swapping the corner pieces from the backhoe with on of the 1×2 edge pieces. Overall the model is fun and nice proportioned. It would be great if it had different diameter tyres, fore & aft, like a JCB but that would reduce the flexibility for making other models.

The other two vehicles are strong and fun to build and play with too. The dumper is a particularly nice little model. The way that the rear skip hinges is neatly and interestingly done.

This set is a great little parts pack, with most of the pieces in standard LEGO colours such as black, yellow and grey. There are four, yellow 1×2 curved bricks amongst other useful stuff. It’s also a brilliant, cheap bit of fun for the younger builder in your household: a great addition to that order for the 42055 that you’re buying for yourself (yes, we know, those big yellow rings are essential for your next MOC and it’s the only way to get hold of them). At this price, you could buy three 31041s and build one of each vehicle to use together in a diorama (obviously you wouldn’t be playing with them). Go on, make that investment!

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Forking Brilliant

Lego Technic RC Forklift

We like the unsung heroes of the automotive world here at TLCB. These are the vehicles without which daily life would grind to a halt, but which spend their days unseen and unappreciated, working around the clock to keep the wheels of society turning. The greatest of these is perhaps the forklift, and Flickr’s Mahjqa has decided to give this humble automotive ant its time in the sun.

Lego Remote Control Technic Forklift

This is his ‘Muravi’ forklift, and it is – and we’re not overstating this – probably the best piece of Lego engineering that you will have seen this year. Brilliantly packaged within it are remotely controlled drive, rear-steer, and forklift raising, lowering and tilting mechanisms, all of which are operable via a bluetooth  device courtesy of the neat third-party SBrick.

Lego Remote Control Forklift SBrick

Mahjqa’s system works as beautifully and flawlessly as any real forklift, and to demonstrate its abilities Mahjqa has created a simply enthralling video of his creation at work. It’s one of the the coolest Lego videos we’ve ever seen, and it’s making us think very carefully about whether we need Elves to work in TLCB Archives when a couple of these will do the job so much more efficiently. And without any fights.

There’s lots more to see at Mahjqa’s Flickr photostream, and you can watch the Muravi forklift in action via the superb video below.

YouTube Video:

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Get Forked

Lego technic RC Forklift

We’ve been quite pleased with TLCB Elves recently. Not only have they found lots of tasty Lego creations for us to feature, they’ve beaten the proper blogs to a few of them by days. We’re not always as rubbish as we think we are here!

Sadly the Elves, being violent little turds, can consistently be relied upon to balance out any of their good deeds with something awful.

In today’s awful event, two Elves were found pinned against the office cactus by a (brilliant) remote controlled Technic fork lift, its wheels still spinning furiously as the Elf at the controls tried to drive its colleagues deeper into their spiny green hell.

Upon discovery the demented driving Elf abandoned its find and escaped cackling into the night, leaving us to extract the assaulted Elves and – borrowing an office intern’s eyebrow tweezers – spend an evening removing cactus spines from various Elven body parts. Sometimes we hate working at The Lego Car Blog.

Back to the creation, and it’s almost worth all of tonight’s fuss. Built by Eurobricks’ Kevin Moo it features five Power Functions motors for a variety of functions, and you can see more at the Eurobricks forum via the link above.

Lego Technic Forklift

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Little Forker

Lego Forklift

You don’t need a million bricks to appear here – sometimes the simplest models are the best. David VII‘s little Town-scale forklift is simple playable goodness, and you can go and fork yourself at the link above.

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Tugs in Space

Lego Space Tug

If you have a spaceship like this one, parking it might be tricky. Luckily Billyburg‘s classic space heavy lifting tug is here to help. You can see more of his beautifully creative ‘4 K-Lifter’ at the link above.

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Forking Good

Lego RC SBrick Forklift

This might be the best Technic creation we’ve seen so far this year. It’s a Hyster forklift truck and it’s been built by friend of TLCB, published author, and Technic genius Paul Kmiec – better known as Sariel.

Sariel is famous for his functioning Technic models and his latest takes the genre to a new level of engineering accuracy. Underneath the smooth yellow bodywork there are several Power Functions motors powering the drive, steering, and raising, lowering and tilting of the front-mounted lift.

Sariel has then incorporated the newly-designed ‘SBrick‘ into the build, meaning that all the functions can be controlled via Bluetooth through a mobile device. It’s a very clever piece of kit and something we’d love to explore further here at TLCB Towers.

Lego Technic Sariel Forklift SBrick

The forklift can also be fitted with a range of interchangeable attachments, some of which feature pneumatics controlled by an in-built compressor, including a grab and an excavating bucket. LEGO, hire this man please!

You can see more of Sariel’s incredible creation on MOCpages and via the excellent video below, and if you’d like to understand how creations such as this are designed and built we highly recommend Sariel’s ‘Incredible Lego Technic’ book – click this link for a preview.

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A Forking Good Time

Lego Technic Forklift

One of our favourite builders, the Technic genius Nick Barrett, is back with two beautifully engineered forklift trucks. Each is loaded with Technic functionality, which Nick has used to hoist a rival, and most excellent, Lego blog’s logo. You can see Nick’s latest work on both MOCpages and Flickr.

We’re also delighted to announce that some of our Elves cornered Nick Barrett last week, and the result is that he joins The Lego Car Blog’s Master MOCers Series as our 8th Master MOCer!

Click here to read Nick’s Master MOCer interview!

Lego Technic Forklift

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Fork-Off

Not just an excuse for a slightly rude title, but a comparison of Technic fork lift trucks….

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We’ll start with set 850, just as Technic itself did, way back when the summers were warm and everybody was on strike. In 1977, this was the very first ‘Expert Builder’ set. In common with the other early sets, there were instructions for 3 models and a wealth of further ideas on the box. The model itself is very cute, if somewhat basic. A quick build, it uses the limited palette of pieces then available to good effect. The first technic model is still the one with the best steering system, for instance. Exceptionally smooth in operation, sensibly geared and with a generous lock; a system that simply hasn’t been bettered since. Ally that to the very short wheelbase and you have an amazingly manoevreable model.

Moving frontwards, things are less happy. The forks are too long and too close together, they don’t rise very far and the system to move them is very basic. Tilting them is but the fevered dream of a madman… as for loading them – you’ll need to put something heavy under the seat first. So, 850 the model is probably a 5/10. 850 the set is more like a 9. There’s a perfect mix of bricks and the new technic parts here to make all kinds of yellow building site stuff. The perfect starter kit.

Moving on to 1984, and a demonstration that original style pneumatics can actually work, in the form of the slightly unhappy looking 8843. Maybe it should just be red or yellow, rather than both… This time at least, the forks will tilt, and there’s even an additional hand-of-god steering control to supplement the one in the cab, which (praise be!) is still connected. It’s rather a pity, therefore, that the steering feels very stiff, because the system incorporates 8 bevel gears (4 of which are in the roof!) and these are the older, flat 14 tooth gears which seem to have more friction than the newer design. It doesn’t help that the cab’s wheel rubs against some of the pneumatic tubing as it turns.

Whilst it does feel somewhat churlish to criticize a feature that I’m always begging to see brought back, this would actually be better without it. Don’t think for a moment that this will stop me nagging to see its return on new models…. capricious, moi?

At the front, things are better. The pneumatic installation is quite neat, there’s an extra long piston (not as illustrated; the one pictured is assembled from my collection, with period pneumatics from 8040) to facilitate a good range of movement, and the forks are linked to it via short lengths of chain. Operate the pump and they whizz up and down very happily, and will do so with a reasonable load, as well. To achieve this, millimetre perfect lining up of the chain is necessary – it uses tread link pieces wedged in holes and some of the clearances are very tight – but do that and it’ll work fine.

8843 is a good effort; in some ways a useful improvement on 850, but it’s lost that model’s best features – the B model here is a sketchy looking tow truck and the varied colour palette means there’s not enough pieces of one colour in this small set to make convincing alternatives. 6/10.

Fast forward to 1989; it’s goodbye Berlin Wall and, somewhat less momentously, hello 8835. Much better looking than its predecessor, it also benefits from a lifting mechanism that closely mirrors the solution on real forklifts. Smoother steering too, although wouldn’t it be nice if there was a wheel in the cab….? (yes, yes, I know…)

The only demerit with this model concerns the jerky movement of the forks. The brick-built carrier that wraps around the spars is too tight-fitting to move smoothly, as if the designers had forgotten the far more elegant solution to this problem found on 8843. At least they hadn’t forgotten about the tilt function.

Although 8835 is just as multi-coloured as its predecessor, the colours are much more harmonious and this is a handsome model. The B model suffers in the same way as 8843’s, though. It’s a less-than-convincing tractor. Stick to the forklift though and this is a good set, with only one major flaw. 8/10

Still with me? You’re doing well, don’t give up now… Continue reading

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Fork Me

Lego Forklift Truck

Everyone likes a good forking. Brickshelf’s legosamigos certainly does, and although his Crawler Forklift is a type of vehicle we’ve not seen before here at TLCB Towers, when you need to fork in a muddy field there’s probably nothing better suited to the job. You can see all the photos of the Power Functions controlled creation at the link above.

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