Author Archives: Dr Asp Menace

Febrovery Mash Ups

The fun festival of all things Lego, sci-fi and car-like that is Febrovery has started over on Flickr. These mash-ups of parts and stickers from LEGO’s Disney “Cars” license and old space themes from Frost really caught our eye. The pair of bonnets (hoods for American readers), wrapped around the rocket on the M:Tron design, are particularly good bit of NPU.

The group is already filling up with a wide variety of eccentric and sometimes useful looking vehicles from a wide variety of builders, many of whom are TLCB regulars. Click this link to the group to find out what’s going on.

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Mega Micro Space

Rat Dude has built this tiny version of the classic 6989 Mega Core Magnetizer. It comes complete with a telescopic grab arm and little rover, just like the original. There’s also a very neat helicopter, featuring some ice-lolly NPU. Being a food item, it was instantly spotted by the TLCB Elves. Click the link at the start of the post and see if you can spot it too.

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Traditional Caravans

Letranger Absurde has made this lovely pair of Gypsy caravans. Nicely decorated in traditional style, we particularly liked the rounded roof of the right most of the two. Being proper petrolheads at TLCB, we all love a good caravaning trip. Click the links in the text to go caravaning too.

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Vital Vittles

After a hard day at work, subduing rampant rampaging Elves and occasionally writing a bit of copy, there’s nothing TLCB’s editors enjoy more than relaxing with a tin of chilled beverage. Because of this, DOGOD Brick Design’s can shaped truck instantly caught our eye on Flickr. Vitali is a popular drink in Taiwan, with a fleet of delivery vehicle shaped liked its tins of drink. Disappointingly for us, it turned out that Vitali is non-alcoholic but we still enjoyed the nicely filled interior and custom stickers.

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42062 Container Yard Review

Scrolling through the Brick Badger website can be a dangerous business, especially if you haven’t bought any new bricks for a while. It was a dull Sunday afternoon at TLCB Towers. The Elves had decided to find out which colour of 32009 Technic beam could do the most damage when beaten against a colleague’s head (medium lilac apparently). We were wandering the interweb and spotted the 42062 Container Yard was nearly 40% off on the famous riverine retailer.

The set contains 631 pieces, including a selection of beams in LEGO’s standard blue and orange colours, plus eight, grey 64782 flat panels. Not owning the 42056 Porsche 911, a source of orange Technic pieces is always welcome and the grey panels looked like they’d come in handy for making neat bases for MOCs.  There’s also one of the new worm gears and a good number of 18654 (15, plus spares). LEGO insists on calling these 1×1 beams, despite the pieces obvious inability to perform this engineering function. The most obvious new pieces in the set are the 18942 and 18940 Gear Rack & Housing. It will be interesting to see what use MOCers come up with for these parts. The set continues Technic’s trend of axles coming in a variety of colours: red, yellow and brown in this case.

Building the models is the usual, enjoyable adventure with Lego. There is a very nicely produced instruction book for both the main build and the B-model. The different colours are well differentiated and the days of dark grey and black getting confused are long gone. The parts come in numbered bags; building the tractor unit, the trailer and finally the telehandler. It took us a couple of hours of building and tea-drinking to complete the build. Builders at the youngest end of the suggested age range might find this quite a marathon of building and concentrating. Perhaps an advantage of this set is that you can build the lorry (and pause to play with it), build the trailer (and pause to play with it) and finish off with the telehandler. We certainly did!

As you would hope from a set with two different models, there are a good variety of mechanisms for young (and old!) engineers to build and play with in this set. Each vehicle has a different steering mechanism, plus the four-bar linkage that raises the arm on the telehandler, which also uses that new worm gear. Purists might be annoyed that the A model doesn’t use the gear rack to extend the telehandler’s arm. However, the B model does and the A model uses an interesting camming mechanism similar to the locking mechanism found in early repeater rifles. The container grabbing claw is another very neatly implemented version of a locking knuckle. For a set with a relatively small number of pieces there’s a lot here to inspire amateur engineers to experiment and build their own machines.

Sadly, the one thing that this otherwise excellent and exciting looking set doesn’t do so well on is its playability.  Compromises have had to been made to keep the set within a certain price range, which is understandable. Continue reading

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Little & Large

Fortunately not a Monday night in front of the tele with eighties’ comedy duo Syd and Eddie but a ravishingly beautiful, small-scale version of Lego’s 42056 Porsche 911 GT3 RS. Master interpreter of the Porsche in Lego form, Malte Dorowski is the creator of this 42056 in a smaller scale. Stay tuned to TLCB for another small version of 42056 tomorrow…

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Tipping Obligatory

Our Elven workforce couldn’t resist this nicely detailed mining lorry from Flickr’s LEGO 7. As well the detailing, the “Giant Dump Truck” has some nice play features, including an opening cab & tipping function.  Depending on how you choose to read its name, it could also be a bit rude. Perfect for our Elves and sadly perfect for us too.  Click the link in the text for more photos.

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Fendt F231 GT

This charming little tractor was spotted by the Elves in the LUGNuts group on Flickr. Stefan‘s Fendt F231 GT is the type of machine that is gradually vanishing from farms as people invest in bigger, heavier more capable vehicles. We couldn’t find out much about this particular model and wondered if its “GT” designation actually meant that it was aimed at the Grand Tour of Europe’s roads, given its 35PS/bhp, 3 cylinder engine. Click this link to see more of Stefan’s models and click this link to see more Fendt F231 photos, including one with a caravan in tow.

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Fight for Your Right

The current run of nostalgia and the run of aeroplane builds continues here at The Lego Car Blog towers. During this writer’s late teens it was quite normal to see Volkswagens bereft of their iconic badges and the cause was the Beastie Boys. Brick Flag has created the crumpled tail end of a Boeing 727 that featured on the group’s classic album “Licensed to Ill“. Click here to see unedited photos of the model, including the neat rock-work on the red cliff the ‘plane has hit or here to travel back to the 1980s again.

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Memory Lane

For builders of a certain generation Dennis Bosman has performed a miracle of Lego reconstruction. The 8889 Technic Ideas book was published in 1984, just four years after the original 8888 book. 8889 showed just how quickly the parts available and building techniques for the Technic part of the Lego System had moved on. As well as step-by-step instructions for some builds (this writer’s favourite was the strange 6-wheeled vehicle) there were photos of additional models. Across two double-page spreads was a massive truck. How to build it though? This is what Dennis Bosman has done, using only contemporary parts. Click this link to travel back in time…

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Hairpin

Things have become a bit slack at TLCB towers recently. The Elf-Wrangler-in-Chief is away and we must admit to having been rather lenient with the Elves. We’ve left top off the Smarties jar on more than one occasion. We’ve enjoyed the abundance of Lego aeroplanes that they’ve brought us, though the little monsters must realise that these aren’t cars! This morning, two of the Elves staggered in looking a bit soggy. They’d swum home from Amsterdam carrying Ralph Savelsberg’s EA-1F Skyraider and tried to tempt us with it.

Fortunately, we’d read The Brothers Brick and spotted this beautiful scene by Simon Pickard on Flickr. Simon’s model of this famous part of a famous F1 circuit must have involved a great deal of patience. He has wedged hundreds of tiles, edge-on, to create a smooth and flowing tarmac curve. Topped off with two cars from different ages of racing and a nice crane, this model is well worth a further look.

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Highway to the Danger Zone

The art of Air Combat Manoeuvring (ACM) came to the attention of the general public with Tony Scott’s 1986 film, Top Gun. Whilst this concentrated on the US Navy’s school the US Marine Corps and Air Force have similar units. With the advent of high-tech missiles, guns and dog-fighting were deemed to be obsolete. Pilots would be able to destroy their enemies using radar, way before they were close enough to see them.

Vietnam was to become the testing ground for the technology. However, the Rules of Engagement often dictated that the identity of opponents had to be visually confirmed first. This could lead the heavy American aircraft (often with no guns) into tight, close-in, turning fights with lighter, cannon armed MiGs. Analysis showed that US airmen needed new aircraft, leading to the F-15 & F-16 programmes and new skills, which lead to the creation of the USAF’s Aggressor squadrons. These squadrons flew lightweight aircraft, often of types not used by the US, which could simulate the tactics and manoeuvres used by enemies.

Evan M‘s excellent F-16C comes from the 16th Weapons Squadron, based at Nellis AFB. The model does a very good job of capturing the smooth curves of the F-16’s blended fuselage and wing in angular Lego. The tan & brown colours from Lego also represent one of the various colours scheme used by the squadron. Click here to see more images and click here to take the Highway to the Danger Zone.

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Ambulance!

Yesterday’s belated birthday celebrations have left a trail of bashed and battered Elves across the Axminster in the The Lego Car Blog offices. The effects of jelly and ice-cream on our mythological workforce was quite startling, following their meagre diet of meal tokens and Smarties.

What better way to clear up the bodies than this lovely 5-wide ambulance from the prolific de-marco? Click this link to see more views.

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Flight of Fantasy

Jon Hall‘s fantasy aeroplanes have featured several times before on TLCB. His Fe-47 Rapier is just as impressive and creative as his previous ‘planes. The aircraft has Jon’s trademark custom decals and a smoothly streamlined fuselage. Streamlined that is apart from the giant cannon that is this model’s most prominent feature. Click the link in the text to see more views of the aeroplane, as Jon releases them over the next few days.

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Not A Car

Well, actually, yes it is a car. Confusingly, most people in TLCB’s home country call kayaks “canoes” and canoes “kayaks”. Even more confusingly, this kayak is actually a car. Yet more perplexingly, this combination of boat and car isn’t amphibious. We are now highly befuddled and are going to lie down in a dark room.

If you’re not feeling too confused, go and view images of this monocoque machine on Jme Wheeler’s Photostream.

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