Tag Archives: Peugeot

La Goutte Grise

Lego Peugeot 607

France has built many fine luxury cars. This is not one of them.

Launched at the end of the millennium, the Peugeot 607 was an anonymous grey blob of a car that sold like anthrax cupcakes. Built at the height of Peugeot’s reliabilities issues, the last thing anyone wanted was a French car loaded with extra equipment which would inevitably and immediately go wrong.

This meant that like Renault’s (admittedly very adventurous) luxury offerings at the time, the Peugeot 607 was destined to be used almost exclusively as a tool for French Government officials, and then later – after the free-fall depreciation had kicked-in – as a taxi at Portuguese airports.

Lego Peugeot 607

This Lego homage to one of the world’s least good luxury cars is the work of Rolands Kirpis of Flickr, and it is quite simply an exceptional build. Everything that makes the real Peugeot 607 look like a part dissolved dishwasher tablet makes it one hell of a tricky car to reconstruct from right-angled Danish plastic, however Rolands has done a remarkably effective job of capturing the 607’s, er… blobby-ness? Blobicity? Blobery? Whatever.

Featuring a detailed interior, an opening hood with a neat and recognisable engine underneath, an opening boot, and four opening doors with some of the most intricate window frames we’ve ever seen, Roland’s Lego 607 is definitely worth a closer look. You can see the fully gallery of images at his photostream by clicking on the link above, and we’ll leave you with one more shot capturing an inevitable moment in mid-2000s Peugeot ownership…

Lego Peugeot 607

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Plan B

Lego Peugeot 205 Turbo 16

We rarely feature digital creations here at TLCB. Today though we’re going to break our own rule, because this virtual Peugeot 205 Turbo 16 Group B rally car is an absolute delight.

Built in the mid-1980s to race in the World Rally Championship, Peugeot’s monster mid-engined all-wheel-drive 205s won the final two Group B World Championships in ’85 and ’86, before the formula was banned.

This wonderful recreation of one of the most fearsome WRC cars ever is the work of newcomer Fabrice Larcheveque, who has replicated Peugeot Sport’s famous 1980s livery brilliantly in digital form, and has absolutely nailed the car that wears it too.

Fabrice has built several other iconic cars in LEGO’s Speed Champions style and you can see more of these, plus the Peugeot 205 Turbo 16 featured here, via MOCpages, plus you can also vote for the Peugeot to become the next officially-licensed car in the Speed Champions range via LEGO Ideas.

Lego Peugeot 205 Turbo 16

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UMM…

Lego UMM Alter II

This slightly sad looking vehicle is an UMM Alter II, built from ’86 until ’96 by Portuguese metal-works União Metalo-Mecânica, primarily for use in utilities and military applications.

Based on a design bought from France and mostly fitted with Peugeot engines the UMM Alter was a surprisingly tough and capable machine, with 10,000 finding a home in UMMs markets around the Mediterranean and Africa.

This perfectly recreated Model Team replica of the UMM Alter II is the work of Flick’s Biczzz and it features working steering, rear suspension and opening doors and hood. There a large gallery of images available and you can see more via the link above.

Lego UMM Alter II 4x4 Biczzz

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Turbeot

Lego Peugeot 205 Turbo 16

TLCB has a long-standing apathy for Peugeot, but it hasn’t always made unreliable, ugly euroboxes. Back in the 1980s Peugeot made some seriously cool cars, and this is one of their highlights; the insane Group B Peugeot 205 Turbo 16.

Flickr’s _zux_ has recreated one of the finest cars of the ’80s in both WRC and Pikes Peak specification, each with all-wheel-drive, steering, suspension, and the mighty mid-mounted four-cylinder turbocharged engine. There’s lots more to see on Flickr – click the link above to make the jump.

Lego Technic Peugeot 205 Turbo Group B

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Pretty Peugeot

Lego Peugeot Concept

Iconic French manufacturer Peugeot haven’t had much exposure here at TLCB. This is mostly because the Lego community haven’t been building many Peugeots, and that’s probably because most of the brand’s recent offerings have been… well, crap.

However, the future is looking brighter for Peugeot fans. There’s a 270bhp GTI on the way, the company’s recent run of new products has been fairly well received by the motoring press, and their styling direction is no longer modelled on a deep sea fish that’s washed up on the shore and been left in the sun for a few days. It’s could even be called even pretty.

There’s reason to be optimistic then, and it’s nice to see this reflected in an unusual Peugeot build from previous bloggee F@bz, whose ‘Lanius’ concept car uses some clever techniques to create its swoopy shape. There’s more to see at F@bz’ photstream on Flickr – click the above to make the jump.

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French Knickers

Lego peugeot 403

Peugeot have – at last – got their act together and started to make cars that we wouldn’t mind owning again. After the horrible 2000s (307 anyone?) we’d pretty much given up hope for the French brand, but currently things are looking up, and we wish them all the best.

We quite like Peugeot because, despite the awfulness of the last 15 years, they do actually have a back-catalogue of some rather desirable (and even reliable) cars. One such model was this; the pretty 403 cabriolet, one of the nicest topless models to come out of France since Brigitte Bardot. This Town-scale version was built by Flickr’s mijasper, and you can see more of it via the link above.

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Tonight on Top Gear… Picture Special

Lego TopGear Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond James May

 …Jeremy will be mildly offensive, James will wear a wooly jumper, and Hammond will indulge in some bad acting. But we’ll still love it.

BBC’s Top Gear began way back in 1977 as a fairly straight-laced motoring magazine, updating the great unwashed on the latest new cars and motoring news (remember; no internet in 1977!). The original show helped to launch the careers of many TV motoring journalists, including the brilliant Tiff Needell and Quentin Wilson, and of course a certain Mr. Clarkson and Mr. May.

Lego Top Gear Studio Jeremy Clarkson

Top Gear evolved during these first decades becoming more humorous and politically incorrect, helped largely by the arrival of Quentin and Jeremy whose reviewing style could make-or-break a new car. After a one particularly damning review Peugeot famously declared that they were removing all of their adverts from the BBC – but of course due to the unique way the BBC is funded, Top Gear and everything else broadcast contains no advertising at all anyway. Take that Peugeot!

Lego Top Gear Richard Hammond

In 2000 however, the BBC canned Top Gear and sold the production (but not the name) to Channel 5, and Fifth Gear was born. Most of the presenters moved across to the new show and we’ve had to read uninformed ‘This is Fifth Gear you dumb %$@£!’ comments on YouTube (when a video correctly shows old Top Gear) ever since.

The BBC held onto the name for good reason though. In 2002 Top Gear returned, with a new format, new presenters, and – for the first time – an actual studio! Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond and Jason Dawe fronted this first season, before Jason was replaced by James to give us the genius line-up that has been in place ever since.

Top Gear’s new format has proved wildly successful, with over 350million viewers from 170 countries tuning in every week. And that’s not counting the re-runs showing every hour on Dave.

Lego TopGear Jeremy Clarkson

Such success has led to mistakes though, as Top Gear has become less genuine and more scripted over the years in a quest to recreate past (naturally occurring) glories. It’s also given the presenters an opportunity to make other programmes, and ‘Richard Hammond’s 5 O’Clock Show’ is an abomination that will be forever etched into a dark corner of the televisual hall-of-shame. Thankfully it only lasted a month, and James May’s independent presenting more than makes up for Hammond’s. James even built a house out of LEGO.

Lego James May TopGear

So what next for Top Gear? Well there are now live arena shows once a year, spin-offs for Australia, Russia, Korea, America and others, a new DVD each Christmas, and there’s a whole world of slightly crap merchandising. Andy Wilman (Top Gear’s producer) admits the show – at least in its current format – is probably nearer to the end of its life than the start, but we expect to keep watching for little a while yet. Onwards to season 22!

All of the photos in this post were produced by the exceptionally talented Stephan Sander, who has lovingly recreated Jeremy, James and Richard in brick form.  He’s also constructed superb Lego models of Jeremy’s Citroen Motorhome, a trio of Jaguar E-Types, three Ferraris, three Lotuses and the famous Top Gear studio – complete with a wonderfully diverse audience! We highly recommend a trip to Stephan’s MOCpage to see all the photos. Back to the studio…

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