Tag Archives: missile launcher

Russian Rubezh

The Cold War. A fantastically pointless game between two megalomaniacal superpowers that very nearly destroyed half the planet. Still, at least we won’t repeat that mistake again. What’s that? We are?!… Sigh. Better start storing tinned food.

Anyway, this hulk of Soviet terror is a ‘Rubezh’ coastal missile launcher, shown here in East German specification where it was deployed up until the fall of the Soviet Union and Germany’s reunification in 1990.

This expertly recreated mini-figure scale version comes from Ralph Savelsberg (also aptly known as Mad Physicist) of Flickr and there’s more to see of this Cold War monstrosity at his photostream via the link above.

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Trump This

Lego MM1 Teracruzer Missile Carrier

Today is the inauguration of the 45th President of the United States of America, and here at The Lego Car Blog we’re commemorating this milestone event with something old, dangerous, and orange.

Built to scare the Soviets in the late 1950s this is a MM1 Teracruzer eight-wheel-drive missile carrier, complete with a Martin Mace nuclear missile, and despite its murderous (and completely futile) purpose, it’s a magnificent looking thing. It’s as if Thunderbirds were run by a maniacal doom-monger.

Anyhow, whilst we settle in for an afternoon of pointless pickering over the state of U.S. politics you can check out more of this absolutely brilliant mini-figure replica of the Teracruzer courtesy of Brian Williams of Flickr by clicking here, or alternatively you can watch something just as old, dangerous and orange at the inauguration ceremony…

Lego MM1 Teracruzer Missile Carrier

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Cold War

Lego F4-B Phantom

The news is making for pretty grim reading at the moment. Russia is on the war path again (yay…), albeit covertly and surrounded by furious Kremlin denials, and America is too, although this time they have the support of forty countries including some unlikely middle-eastern allies (even Iran).

Unlike the era from which today’s models originated, the two great nuclear powers are currently fighting on different fronts, and merely throwing testosterone fuelled political doctrine at one another in regards to their respective conflicts. Of course during the Cold War it was only strong words that were exchanged too, but it could have been so very different.

The awesome F4-B Phantom was the cornerstone of America’s air attack in the 1960s-’80s, and this incredible recreation of the multi-role fighter is the work of the brilliant Bricktrix on Flickr. Featuring custom decals, working flaps, air-brakes, tail rudder, tail hook, folding wing tips, retractable landing gear and flashing nav lights, you can see the Phantom’s full gallery via the link above.

To defend the Soviet Union from the likes of the Phantom the Soviets responded with this, the Tunguska 9K22/2S6 Tracked Self-Propelled Anti-Aircraft System. D-Town Cracka‘s perfectly recreated Lego version is detailed right down to the eight 9M311 surface-to-air missiles that would have been used to defend the motherland’s air-space.

Thankfully the two giant (and moronic) superpowers never exchanged fire. Just two decades earlier they had stood shoulder-to-shoulder in the Second World War to defeat Nazism too. How quickly we forget the lessons of history…

Lego Cold War Soviet Missile-Launcher

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Road Warrior

Lego Road Warrior

This mean looking Technic supercar found it’s way to TLCB Towers via the Feedback and Submission Suggestions page, having generated a very positive response over on MOCpages. Relative newcomer Ryan Evens‘ ‘Road Warrior’ features all of the usual Technic supercar toys, including a working engine, gearbox, steering and Power Functions remote control, and also a few extras you wouldn’t normally expect to find. We’ll let you head over to his MOCpage to uncover what they are. The nosiest of our Elves got a surprise when they snuck out to investigate…

 

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Russian Monster

Lego Maz 7907This incredible vehicle is a MAZ 7907, built in the 1980s to transport Russian missiles. It was propelled by over 1200bhp, had 24 wheels (all driven), and was more than 28 meters long. Only two were ever built, and thankfully never used for their intended purpose. Only one of the two remains, with the other machine cannibalised to supply parts for the first.

The spectacular recreation of the MAZ 7907 in the picture above is the work of Polish builder Patryk Walerzak. Weighing in at 5.3 KG and at nearly 1.5 meters long,  Patryk’s version is one of the largest Technic creations we’ve ever seen. Inside the monster chassis are 6 Power Functions motors and over 100 gearwheels. Because this awesome machine really works. To find out more visit the Eurobricks discussion page or the Brickshelf gallery.

YouTube Video:

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It’s the end of the world as we know it…

Lego Missile Launcher

21/12/12. The date the Mayan’s reached on their calendar before they got bored and went down the pub.

Is this our last post ever? Probably not. But if it were, it’s good to go out with a bang. Even better to go out with four really big bangs! D-Town Cracka is the megalomaniac behind this ridiculous Soviet SA-3 Goa Rocket launcher. Whilst he sounds like an early-’90s rapper, Mr Cracka is properly handy with a LEGO brick; there are over 300 pieces in each missile alone. View the full gallery on Flickr.

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