Tag Archives: BMC

Metropolitan Revolution

Cities can be wonderfully diverse places, where different cultures, races, and even languages mix together to create a greater whole. The automotive industry is rather similar, although these days certain quarters see this as some kind of evil globalisation, rather than countries making what they’re best at to, again, create a greater whole.

However back in the 1950s sharing production between countries wasn’t really a thing yet, until Nash came along with their design for a new sort of car (in the U.S. at least), railing against ‘bigger is better’ by making something… smaller. Their revolutionary mindset continued to production, which wouldn’t have been profitable in the U.S.

Instead Nash turned to Austin/Rover in England, who were selected to produce the car on behalf of Nash and fitted it with their own B-Series engine. The car became the ‘Metropolitan’ upon it’s return to the U.S where, in yet more revolutionary thinking, it became the first post-war American car marketed specifically to women.

The Nash Metropolitan received mixed reviews from an American motoring press rather unwilling to try anything that wasn’t sixteen feet long, but these proved to be rather different when people bought the Metropolitan and actually used it, whereupon it surpassed expectations.

It wouldn’t be until the oil crisis of the 1970s that America really took small cars seriously though, and marketing to women was probably further behind that even, yet Nash and Austin’s collaboration had proved the concept some two decades earlier.

Fast forward to today and we seem to be in some sort of ‘Tenet’ style inversion, as ’50s style ‘bigger is better’ and ‘not foreign’ are climbing America’s agenda once again. We’ll stick with the little ’50s Nash Metropolitan though, a revolution ahead, and now perhaps behind, the times…

Oh yeah, Lego… This beautiful little 4-wide recreation of the Metropolitan comes from previous bloggee 1saac W., and there’s more to see at his photostream. Click the link to join the revolution.

Do It Yourself Mr Bean

Some TV shows are famous for their cars. Knight Rider has KITT, The Saint has the Volvo P1800, Dukes of Hazard the Dodge Charger, Starsky and Hutch the Ford Gran Torino, and Mr. Bean… a Mini with an armchair strapped to the roof.

There was a very good reason for the armchair to be on the roof, which Flickr’s Lasse Deleuran has recreated perfectly with this wonderful 5-wide homage to Mr. Bean’s trip back from the DIY store.

Head to Lasse’s photostream via the link above to see more. Just make sure the head of your broom doesn’t fall off…

Happiness is Mini shaped

Lego Technic Mini

A Mini Mini

This Mini, recently posted to MOCpages by the incredibly talented Nick Barrett, is so lifelike it’ll probably start rusting soon. Underneath the remarkably accurate bodywork sits a real working model of the famous BMC A-Series engine, driving the fully suspended front wheels via a working gearbox. It has working lights, brakes, hand brake, door locks, tilting seats… in fact we’re fairly confident in saying this is the most accurate vehicle we’ve ever featured. Join us in awe on MOCpages.

A-Team

BMC A-Series

Raw power! Ok, maybe not raw power. Er… Reasonable economy!

Another ‘not a car’ post, but this time it is car-related, honest. This little plastic thingumy is a 1:6 scale BMC A-Series engine, as fitted to all manner of dinky British cars for over 50 years. This wasn’t because it was the world’s greatest engine by any means, rather because the British were too lazy to bother replacing it. Still, they now have a thriving car industry, proving that such thriftiness is well judged and commendable. Is our sarcasm filter on? It is? Oh good. Anyway, this little power-plant did do sterling service in some well loved vehicles, including the Austin/Morris Mini, Morris Minor, Morris Marina/Austin Allegro… wait, maybe not that last one. Nick Barrett, a TLCB regular, is the mechanic behind it. See more, including a video of the engine working, on MOCpages.

A ’70s Topless Model…

MGB Lego

Rubber on the bottom, nothing on the top – let’s see the hits rack up!

Put simply, this is the best car we’ve seen all year. The Elf who found it would’ve got a hug if we could bring ourselves to. Still, we thought about it. Anyway, this absurdly brilliant creation is a ’70s MGB, and is as accurate in its Technical functions as it is aesthetically. View it on Nick Barrett’s MOCpage – it’ll be the best click you’ve made all year.