Tag Archives: Classic Car

Backbone

Interchangeable bodywork is something that every LEGO vehicle is capable of, by virtue of them being, well… LEGO. However it’s particularly cool if you can swap the whole bodywork out in one piece. Even LEGO themselves tried this back in 1996 with their 8244 Technic set, although the results were a bit weird.

Not so Angka Utama’s attempt, which is properly cool. Entitled ‘Backbone’, Angka has designed three different bodies that can be mounted on his chassis design, and with reversible seats and a moveable engine it can switch between being front, rear or mid-engined in seconds. Take a look on either Flickr or MOCpages to see how it’s done!

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My Fair Lady

This is a Datsun 240Z, or ‘Fairlady’ as it was known in some markets, and it’s surely in contention for the the title of prettiest Japanese car of all time. This Model Team example comes from 5eno of Flickr and there’s more to see at the link.

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Ferrari Testrossa | Picture Special

We’re rounding out the weekend with something rather special. This bewitchingly beautiful Ferrari Testarossa is the work of car-building legend Firas Abu-Jaber, and it is – as you can see here – astonishingly good.

Firas’ spectacularly presented creation is 100% LEGO (those excellent rims are genuine LEGO pieces that have been custom chromed) and includes a superbly detailed engine and interior inside the opening engine cover and doors.

There’s much more of Firas’ Ferrari to see at his Testarossa Flickr album by clicking here, and you can read our interview with the man behind the model by clicking here.

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The Answer’s Always Golf

Whilst in the U.S the answer to every car based question seems to be ‘Miata’ (and rightly so), in Europe it seems to be ‘Golf’. Well, it used to be – now it might be more ‘bland crossover SUV’ – but there are about fifteen Golf-based versions of those so in a way the answer is still ‘Golf’.

It’s mostly decades of clever marketing as the Golf isn’t really any better than a myriad of other hatchbacks, but somehow it’s still the default choice.

Back in the mid-’70s though, the Golf really was way ahead of the competition, thanks to sharp styling by Giorgetto Giugiaro, front-wheel-drive, and the fact that it didn’t fall apart like every other car of the era.

This near-perfect Model Team replica of the Volkswagen Golf Mark 1 comes from Serge S who has captured the classic hatchback brilliantly. There’s a realistic interior and engine bay, opening hood, doors and boot, and there are even instructions available too. Click the link above to get to the default answer c1976.

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Moar Mustang!

We know we’ve posted about four hundred Mustang models recently, but thanks to a recent LEGO Ideas competition they’re popping up all over the place. Plus this one’s yellow and it’s got a supercharger and racing stripes. This modified Mach 1 Mustang comes from TLCB favourite Pixel Junkie and is pictured in his previously featured (and utterly glorious) workshop. Head to Flickr to see more.

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Herd of Horses

Lego Ford Mustang

We have a herd of horses for you today, thanks to LEGO Ideas‘ current Ford Mustang competition celebrating the new Creator 10265 Ford Mustang set. Unusually for a contest the entries will be judged on their scenery as well the car, which has led to some wonderfully inventive designs. Flickr’s JS_Ninjerd is certainly one of them with his brilliant canyon-top build, featuring a Boss Mustang and possibly the coolest mini-figure we’ve ever seen. TLCB Master MOCer Andrea Lattanzio (aka Norton74) has entered two scenes, each featuring a neat classic Mustang in a building setting, from barn find* to specialist workshop, complete with tools and a ubiquitous American flag. There’s more to see of all the builds on Flickr – take a look via the links in the text.

*Add some dust and dirt Andrea!

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Movie Bricks

Lego Mustang Movie Set

Movie making causes probably more vehicular destruction than teenagers, the elderly, and NASCAR combined. It seems no car is off-limits, no matter how awful the movie*. It’s not just the cars that make the final cut either, as often different angles, test shots and failed attempts multiply the kill-count far beyond what you see on screen.

TLCB favourite Pixel Junkie gives us a glimpse into the carefully choreographed world of cinematic car killing with this superbly-shot scene involving a mini-figure film crew, two 70’s Ford Mustangs, and one big accident. Being Lego though, Pixel can rebuild his cars and send them in for the wide-angle shot after the crew’s coffee break. Head over to Flickr via the link above to see more of Take 6.

*Yes that really is a real Porsche Carrera GT getting smashed. How they managed to make it look so fake is beyond us…

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The Best 4x4xFar

Lego Land Rover Series 2A Pick-Up

This lovely land Rover Series 2A pick-up comes from November Juliett of Flickr, who has captured the classic 4×4 beautifully in small-scale Lego form. It’s even got suspension. Head to November’s Land Rover Flickr album via the link above to see more.

Lego Land Rover Series 2A Pick-Up

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Pony Car Pin-Up

Lego 10265 Ford Mustang Poster

It’s been a Mustang heavy couple of days here at The Lego Car Blog, but we can squeeze one more in! This awesome brick-built poster featuring LEGO’s official new Creator 42065 Ford Mustang* set comes from Yu Chris of Flickr, and it looks spectacular!

Yu Chris has made his design available on LEGO Ideas too, so if like us you’d love to hang this on your wall click the link above to see more and cast your vote!

*Well, 3/4 of one. Take a look here to see how it’s done!

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Cobra Jet

Lego Ford Mustang Mach 1 Cobra Jet

Featured here just yesterday with his amazing 2020 Ford Mustang GT500, Firas Abu-Jaber today reminds us that killing yourself and everyone waiting at the bus stop you’ve plowed sideways through has been a Mustang achievement for some time.

This is a Mustang Mach 1 Cobra Jet, which surely counts amongst the most ridiculously overly-masculine car names in vehicular history. Powered by a 335bhp 7litre V8, but still with shocking steering, brakes and suspension, the Cobra Jet was all about straight-line speed, setting multiple Bonneville speed records in the hands of Mickey Thompson in 1969.

Lego Ford Mustang Mach 1 Cobra Jet

This gloriously orange homage to Ford’s mighty late-’60s muscle car looks every bit as good as the real thing, but is considerably less dangerous, with a top speed of whatever you can push it to. The handling and brakes are probably on par with the actual car though.

Built by Firas Abu-Jaber alongside his previously-featured 2020 GT500, there’s much more to see of this stunningly presented creation at his Ford Mustang Mach 1 Cobra Jet Flickr album, and if you’d like to get your hands on your very own classic Mustang you can read our preview of LEGO’s own superb-looking 10265 Creator Ford Mustang set by clicking here.

Lego Ford Mustang Mach 1 Cobra Jet

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How to Build Dream Cars | Book Review

How to Build Dream Cars with LEGO Bricks

There’s one question we get here at The Lego Car Blog more than any other; ‘Can I have instructions?’. Mattia Zamboni, author of the previously reviewed ‘Tiny LEGO Wonders‘ and previous bloggee ZetoVince have decided to respond to the call, and recently sent us their latest book that claims to provide the answers…

Thunderbay Press’s ‘How to Build Dream Cars with LEGO Bricks‘ aims “to deliver accurate car models of epic cars”, and it really does feature some epic cars. From legendary American classics like the Ford GT40, Dodge Charger and Corvette Stingray, through European supercars such as the Lamborghini Countach and Porsche 911, to modern-day exotic hypercars like the Pagani Zonda.

Lego Porsche 911 Instructions

Epicocity achieved then, but how about accuracy? Well Mattia is so confident in the realism of the builds within ‘How to Build Dream Cars’ that the contents page doesn’t name them, or even feature colour, instead showing simply black and white renders of each of the models featured. It works too, creating a beautifully clean look that is maintained throughout the book.

The models are indeed instantly recognisable, at least for car fans which we suspect you’ll be if you’re reading this. LEGO’s own Speed Champions sets are too of course, and we’ve loved seeing each new release in this line-up as LEGO create more partnerships with real-world car manufacturers. However there are many brands that LEGO have not yet partnered with (and may never), and often the sets can be quite sticker-heavy, making recreation from spare parts at home impossible.

‘How to Build Dream Cars’ manages to accurately recreate some of the world’s best known cars without a single sticker, whilst using more advanced techniques to achieve greater realism than LEGO’s Speed Champions sets. Let’s take a look at how!

How to Build Dream Cars

Each model starts with a description and image of the real car, including the all-important fact sheet that all car fans require. The instructions continue the black and white theme and add colour simply via the bricks used in the build. Like Mattia’s ‘Tiny LEGO Wonders’ book, these are slightly more complicated than those found in an official LEGO set, both because the techniques themselves are, and because LEGO have simplified their own steps, sometimes to the point of adding just one piece at a time.

‘How to Build Dream Cars’ feels more like LEGO instructions did a decade or so ago, being noticeably more advanced, and using more monochrome piece colours. This means that there are few contrasting-colour pieces in hidden places (as LEGO now use to make them easier to find/identify), which is appropriate given most builders will be creating these models from their own parts and black/grey is a safe bet.

How to Build Dream Cars with LEGO Bricks

Ingeniously the book also contains a complete parts list (which can be dropped straight into Bricklink should you need to buy them) and video instructions for each model, accessible via the QR Codes printed inside. This makes creating the models in ‘How to Build Dream Cars with LEGO Bricks’ a properly interactive experience should you wish it to be, and makes us wonder why LEGO haven’t done this themselves.

Graphics are excellent, and whilst black-on-black isn’t quite as easy to follow as LEGO’s white-pages the instructions are well laid out, clear, and printed in high quality, with good visuals for sub-assemblies and piece positioning. Most importantly the results are superb, successfully mixing System and Technic parts to recreate the iconic shapes of some of the world’s most famous dream cars, such as the AC Cobra pictured below.

Lego AC Cobra

LEGO are a roll right now with their ever-expanding line-up of officially licensed vehicles. However there are many more amazing cars out there not yet licensed to become official LEGO sets.

If you’d like to expand your own car collection by building some stunning real-world replicas that LEGO haven’t yet created themselves (and that are more detailed and more advanced to build to boot), ‘How to Build Dream Cars with LEGO Bricks’ fulfils the brief brilliantly. From vintage classics to modern supercars, Mattia and Vince have created an excellent instructional guide to building your own dream cars at home, with enough technical specs and vehicle history to keep car fans happy too.

That the book also contains complete parts lists, video instructions, and looks beautiful is the icing on the cake. Highly recommended.

Visit Brick Passion to buy your copy.

Lego Ford GT40

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Dragula

Lego Munsters Dragula Hot Rod

Some vehicles are metaphorically coffins-on-wheels (this, this and this for example), but today we can go one better! Designed by Hot Rod building legend George Barris, this amazing machine is the Dragula, as constructed for the 1960s TV comedy ‘The Munsters’. This marvellous Model Team recreation of the scary sportster is the work of Tim Inman (aka rabidnovaracer), and comes complete with side-stack exhausts, lantern head and tail lights, and Grandpa Munster himself. Head over to Tim’s photostream via the link above for a spooky good time.

Lego Munsters Dragula Hot Rod

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Maranello Magnum

Lego Ferarri 308 GTS

This is a Ferrari 308 GTS, made (more) famous by its continued appearance in 1980s Hawaii-based drama ‘Magnum PI’, and built from 1975 in Maranello Italy before being replaced a decade later by the 328.

Designed by Pininfarina the 308 also has the claim of being the slowest Ferrari ever made, as a 2 litre version (known as the 208) was produced to dodge a tax in Italy that applied to cars over 2000cc. Strangely the 208 was still a V8, just a pointlessly small one, and thankfully ‘Magnum PI’s Thomas Magnum got the proper 2.9 litre 240bhp version.

This excellent recreation of Magnum’s mid-’80s Ferrari 308 GTS comes from Flickr’s Peter Blackert aka Lego911 and there’s more to see at his photostream via the link.

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The Last Lancia

Lego lancia Delta S4 Integrale EVO

This is the last Lancia World Rally Car, and therefore it may as well be the last Lancia, because embarrassments like this, this and this really don’t count. Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, Lancia’s owners, should probably just let the brand die (although to be fair they’re doing a damn good job of trying to kill it), however there was a time when Lancia were on top of the world.

This isn’t actually a car from that time, as the brand was in decline even in the early 1990s, but they could still really build a rally car. This glorious creation is a near-perfect replica of the mighty Lancia Delta HF Intergrale EVO, the car that gave Lancia their sixth (and final) consecutive World Rally Championship in 1992 – a record still unbeaten today – and which wore one of the greatest racing liveries of all time courtesy of Martini.

Built in Tour de Corse specification where the Delta Integrale EVO won in the hands of Didier Auriol, this amazing model is the work of Master MOCer Dennis Glaasker aka Bricksonwheels, who spent four months and 1,700 LEGO pieces to create this astonishing replica of Lancia’s final championship winning car.

Lego lancia Delta S4 Integrale EVO

With a fully detailed interior (complete with roll cage) behind the four opening doors and hatchback, a beautifully replicated engine bay underneath the opening hood, and some of the finest custom decals we’ve ever seen applied to a Lego model, Dennis’ Lancia Delta HF Integrale EVO is one of the most realistic rally cars that this site has featured yet.

A huge gallery of imagery is available to view at Bricksonwheels’ photostream, including some ingenious ‘x-ray’ style cutaways revealing the details within, and you can do just that by clicking here. Join us in amazement at the link.

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More Mustang

Lego Ford Mustang GT Fastback

LEGO’s brilliant new 10265 Creator Expert Ford Mustang set is getting all the attention right now, but there are still builders creating their own stunning renditions of America’s most famous pony car. One such builder is Flickr’s Dornbi, who has spent the last few months creating this beautiful replica of a ’65 GT Fastback. The doors and trunk open, as does the hood under which is a nicely recreated V8 engine, and there’s more to see of Dornbi’s excellent Mustang GT via the link above.

Lego Ford Mustang GT Fastback

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