Tag Archives: RAF

Remembrance Sunday

Lego Great War Dogfight, Fokker Vs Airco

Today is Remembrance Sunday in The Lego Car Blog’s home nation, and never has a Lego image seemed more beautifully suited.

Henrik Jensen‘s wonderful dogfight between a German Fokker Eindecker EIII and his previously featured British Airco DH2 reminds us that the First World War claimed an enormous amount of life on both sides, and was the first war where conflict rather than disease caused the majority of the loss.

The war itself was pretty pointless, yet around 6 million Allied and 4 million Axis Powers servicemen lost their lives, along with an estimated 2 million civilians. We remember them all, including those our forebears fought against.

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The Spinning Incinerator

Lego Airco DH.2 Fighter

This odd contraption is an Airco DH.2, an early First World War fighter aircraft designed by legendary aeronautical pioneer Sir Geoffrey de Havilland.

The early years of flight were dangerous ones, with poor pilot training and machines pushing the boundaries of aeronautics almost continuously. This meant a huge incident rate (and the Airco DH.2 gaining the nickname in today’s title), but once the Royal Flying Corps were familiar with the design the DH.2 proved to be more than a match for its German counterparts, being highly manoeuvrable and relatively easy to fly.

The single Lewis machine gun mounted up front originally swung from side to side, but as pilots found it easier to aim  with their aircraft than the gun it became fixed to the cockpit. Behind the pilot was a French 100bhp Gnome Monosoupape nine-cylinder radial engine, mounted there in ‘pusher’ configuration as unlike the Germans the British hadn’t yet developed a synchronisation system to allow a gun to fire between spinning propeller blades.

The Airco DH.2 had a ridiculously short yet successful career, destroying 44 enemy aircraft in The Battle of the Somme. Such was the pace of development in the First World War that just a year later the arrival of new German fighters meant DH.2 was outclassed and replaced by the DH.5, which itself only lasted a single year in combat operation before the S.E.5 arrived to see out the conflict, by this time looking far more like a plane we would recognise today.

This neat mini-figure scale recreation of the Airco DH.2 comes from Henrik Jensen, and it captures the aircraft’s weirdness rather well. With such a short life-span there are no surviving original DH.2s today, so this may be as close as we’ll get to seeing one – take a look at Henrik’s photostream via the link above, or at MOCpages here.

Lego Airco DH.2 Fighter

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Not a Car

Lego Supermarine Spitfire

But, in this writer’s opinion, the most beautiful aircraft of the Second World War. This gorgeous Supermarine Spitfire comes from Mike Fifer of MOCpages, and it contains some of the most brilliantly-built colouring of any model we’ve found. It’s not just the superb camouflage you can see in these pictures either, as the underside is rather special too. Click the link above to find out why.

Lego Supermarine Spitfire

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Tornado

 Lego Tornado IDS Marineflieger

British warplanes have the best names. Names such as Vampire, Hurricane, Typhoon, Lightning, and this, the awesome Panavia Tornado. Still a mainstay of the RAF and Luftwaffe, the Tornado has been in service since the late ’70s with nearly 1,000 produced during a twenty year production run. This outstanding Lego version of the iconic variable-sweep wing multi-role combat aircraft has been built by Flickr’s Kenneth Vaessen, and is resplendent in German Naval strike specification, complete with Kormoran anti-ship missiles. There’s lots more to see at Kenneth’s photostream and it’s well worth your click – Go supersonic via the link above.

Lego Panavia Tornado

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Three Little Birds

Lego Grumman F4F Wildcat

It’s been a while since we posted a historic warplane here at The Lego Car Blog, so in rectification today we’ve got three! First up (above) is JBIronWorks’ beautiful blue Grumman F4F Wildcat and accompanying diorama. There’s more to see on Flickr by clicking here.

Lego Supermarine Spitfire

The second of today’s trio of Word War 2 fighters comes from Daniel Siskind, who has constructed a brilliant mini-figure scale replica of the legendary Supermarine Spitfire. Daniel’s version pictured here is a Mark V in desert camouflage and there’s lots more too see at his photostream – click the link above to make the trip.

Lego Messerschmitt BF-109

The final creation in today’s threesome, representing the Axis Powers – and the nemesis of the Spitfire above, is the formidable Messerschmitt BF-109. This stunning recreation of the famous fighter has been built by Flickr’s Lennart C, and you can see more of his model by clicking here.

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888,246

Lego Sopwith Camel

Enough of vegetable carving and creepy kids, it’s time for a creation with a bit more meaning. This beautiful mini-figure scale World War 1 Sopwith Camel has been created by Flickr’s Daniel Siskind, and it has a special importance at the moment.

It’s 100 years since Great Britain joined the Great War, with a sacrifice of 888,246 military lives. Of course many more died on both sides of what was a pretty pointless conflict, and even more from disease and starvation. Mankind may have invented fairly sophisticated instruments of death during the war (the Sopwith Camel included), but instruments of preserving life were a long way behind.

You can see more of Daniel’s build here, and you can see the incredible memorial to the 888,264 that the UK is currently undertaking here.

Lego Sopwith Camel Aircraft

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Typhoon

Lego Hawker Typhoon

The RAF like aircraft named after tropical storms and their current BAE Systems Eurofighter Typhoon is one of the world’s finest fighter planes. 70 years earlier the Eurofighter’s grandfather was too. The Hawker Typhoon evolved from the Hurricane as a high altitude fighter, but teething problems meant it never fulfilled this role quite as was intended.

However, the monstrous 2000bhp engine meant that the Typhoon found a new role as a ground attack aircraft (in addition to its job shooting down the BMW-engined Focke-Wulf Fw 190), and it could carry a payload close to that of a dedicated light bomber.

Sadly only one Hawker Typhoon survives today, but K Wigboldy aka Thirdwigg has recreated the legendary World War 2 aircraft so well there might as well be two. His 1:13 Lego replica features the huge 24 cylinder engine that made the Typhoon such an effective weapon, plus an electrically powered variable pitch propellor, working landing gear, flaps, ailerons, elevator and rudder.

More photos can be found on MOCpages via the link above, and you can see all the details plus a video of the working functions by visiting Thirdwigg’s excellent website – find it in the Directory in the main menu.

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Supermarine Spitfire

Lego Supermarine Spitfire

We’ve not posted a plane for a while, so here’s one of our favourites; the beautiful Supermarine Spitfire, built here in Mk. IX form by Henrik Jensen on MOCpages. See all the photos at Henrik’s MOCpage.

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Supermarine

Lego Supermarine Spitfire

This wonderful little Supermarine Spitfire MkV comes from Dornbi on Flickr. Surely one of the most beautiful, and important, aircraft ever built, the Spitfire and its comrade the Hurricane saved British skies from German invasion. And therefore possibly saved Europe too.

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Flying Camel

Lego Sopwith Camel

Sopwith Camel Fighter

This gorgeous mini-figure scale Sopwith Camel fighter plane was discovered on Flickr. Built by TheBrickAvenger, the Camel helped turn the tables in the Allies favour in the skies over France during the First World War. The Avenger’s version is complete with twin Vickers 303 machine guns, support wires and authentic RAF livery. See more here.

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Biplane Battle

Lego Sopwith Camel

Allied Sopwith Camel

A very excited Elf returned to TLCB Towers today. Excited because it was carrying two creations, and two creations means two meal tokens. So now we have a deservedly swollen Elf waddling round the building, and can bring you this pair of wonderful Great War airplanes designed and built by mrutek on Flickr. Handily for the unbiased nature of this post, each represents a side of the First World War; the Allies with an RAF Sopwith Camel and the Axis Powers with a Bomber Biplane, from the days when bombing involved dropping the explosive by hand out of the side of the plane. To see more of these fantastic creations click the link above.

Lego German Bomber

Axis Bomber

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Digging for Spitfires

Spitfire

The most beautiful fighter plane ever?

This incredible Supermarine Spitfire is the work of K Wigboldy aka Thirdwigg on MOCpages. Probably the the most beautiful plane ever designed, and one of the saviors of European, Australian and Soviet skies during World War II, the Supermarine fought throughout the war for the Allied Forces before retiring from RAF service in 1961. Powered by monstrous supercharged Rolls Royce engines the Supermarine nearly went supersonic in dives and paved the way for the supersonic fighters that followed the war.

Today only 40-odd airworthy planes remain from the 20,000 produced – but all that could change in 2013. A long rumored cache of buried Spitfires in Burma is due to be excavated this year, with up to 60 of the planes hidden neatly in unopened packing crates for 60 years. The Supermarines were shipped to Burma to equip the Allies in the war in the Pacific. However the war finished before they could be built, and the MOD deemed it more economical to bury them than ship them back to the UK. Now that’s a rumor worth buying a metal detector for.

K Wigboldy’s Lego version of the famous fighter is more than a beautiful sculpture. Inside the full-stud body he’s packed in Power Functions control for the Rolls Royce engine, variable-pitch propellor and landing gear, as well as complete cockpit control for the flaps, elevators and rudder. To see more of this amazing creation click the link at the top of the post for MOCpages, or view it on Flickr here.

YouTube Video:

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