Tag Archives: Lowrider

Get Low*

Built (mostly) from the LEGO 10271 Fiat 500 set, Flickr’s Orion Pax has decided to use his primrose yellow pieces for something far more American.

This is a 1960s Chevrolet Impala convertible, complete with custom chrome bricks, and no less than four Power Functions motors. However they don’t do what you might expect…

Instead of the driving the wheels, Orion’s Impala deploys each motor for fully adjustable suspension, with each wheel able to do its own thing independent of the rest. Servos bounce the front wheels up and down, whilst the rears are adjustable thanks to a pair of motor-driven linear actuators.

It’s an ingeniously simple piece of engineering, and one we’d love to see fitted to a MOC of an old Citroen. Because we’re so un-street here at TLCB that we find old Citroens more interesting than pimped American barges.

Until then you can check out Orion’s brilliant Chevy lowrider album on Flickr by clicking here, which includes a video of the remotely controlled suspension in action.

*Today’s title song. Obviously.

Pink Bits

If you’re new to this site and were expecting to see something else based on the title, sorry; here’s a Lego van instead. But it is built from pink bits.

Two shades of pink in fact, which recent previous bloggee Brick Flag has used in the creation of this rather excellent 1960s Dodge A100 van.

The Dodge A100’s story is a similar one to the Ford Econoline that appeared here earlier in the week, being designed to combat the influx of imported Volkswagen Type 2s. Like the Ford, the Dodge was available in pick-up and van body styles, featured a three speed gearbox (three!), and an inline 6-cylinder engine. A V8 was also available, although we have no idea why.

Brick Flag has taken the hot rod route with his superb A100 van, fitting his creation with lowrider suspension and a custom pink paint job, and there are further images available to view on Flickr. Click this link to see more pink bits.

Stripy Bottoms

You don’t need four million bricks to appear here at The Lego Car Blog. A few dozen will do, but admittedly it does help if some of them afford you the ability to build racing stripes. Previous bloggee Tim Henderson has done just that with classic Lowrider compete with Elf-pleasing stripes. See more on Flickr.

King of the Road

Dennis Glaasker aka Bricksonwheels is a firm favourite here at The Lego Car Blog. He’s been building spectacularly detailed Lego creations over a decade now, with the most recent ten years demonstrating how retro-chroming bricks can take the realism of a model to a whole new level.

To celebrate a decade of chrome Dennis has built very possibly the shiniest bike we’ve ever seen, this glorious 1:10 scale Harley Davidson Road King Lowrider complete with, you guessed it, a lot of chromed pieces.

Dennis’ chromed Harley can be seen at his Flickr album by clicking here, you can read his Master MOCers interview here at TLCB via the first link, and you can check out our preview of LEGO’s new officially licensed Harley Davidson Fatboy set by clicking here. Dennis thinks it just needs some chrome…

Fleetwood Mac

Lego Cadillac Fleetwood Lowrider

This utterly glorious Cadillac Fleetwood Le Cabriolet* low rider is possibly the shiniest, most detailed, most perfect model we’ve featured this year.

Built by TLCB Master MOCer Dennis Glaasker (aka BricksonWheels) the Caddy shows how far LEGO can be taken as a model-making medium. Really really far.

There’s lots more to see at Dennis’ Flickr photostream, which is where we’re going to be for quite some time. Bounce over there with us by clicking these words.

Lego Cadillac Fleetwood Le Cabriolet Low Rider

*Yup, they really did call it that.

Bounce

Lego Lowrider

Bounce bounce bouncy bounce. Mahjqa has created a Technic lowrider – and it really works! Check it out at the link above, and watch it in action below.

YouTube Video:

Vanilla (Choc) Ice

Lego Lowrider

We’ll take both please

Time for a beautiful metaphor highlighting the fruitlessness of racism. These equally brilliant Lowriders come courtesy of Orion Pax over on Flickr. Different they may be, but they’re both spectacularly well built, and also seem to be held up by magic. Check them out at Orion’s Flickr photostream, where you can find a link to his rather superb website.