Tag Archives: Lego

Batlift Truck

Ever wondered how Batman moves all his stuff around the Batcave? No, us neither, but Pasq67 has.

Cue Batman’s Fenwick forklift truck, which – considering it only operates out of sight in the Batcave – has been unnecessarily restyled to make it more Batty.

It also appears to be used only to transport large quantities of brooms (Batbrooms?) for some reason, but we know very little about comic book superheroes so who are we to argue.

See more on Flickr via the link!

My Other Car’s a Jeep

LEGO’s new 42122 Technic Jeep Wrangler Rubicon set, revealed here last month, has only been released for a week or two, yet previous bloggee Eric Trax has already managed to turn it into something awesome.

Using 557 of the 665 available parts, Eric has transformed his Wrangler Rubicon into this rather excellent off-road buggy, which – like the Jeep upon which it’s derived – features working steering and rear suspension.

Building instructions are available and there’s more to see at the Eurobricks discussion forum via the link above.

Pre-SUV

With the world’s luxury auto makers seemingly in competition to produce the most hideous, obnoxious, and enormous SUV (see here, here, here, and here), we’re going back to a time when a fast family car didn’t need to be the size of Belgium.

This is the Lamborghini Espada, a four-seat grand tourer powered by a 3.9 litre V12, and produced from 1968 to ’78. It was successful too, being Lamborghini’s best selling model until they decided to keep making the Countach for three decades.

This brilliant Speed Champions version of the Espada comes from regular bloggee Jonathan Elliott, who has recreated Lamborghini’s ’70s family car beautifully in 7-wide form.

There’s more of the build to see at his photostream, along with a host of other excellent Speed Champions cars – click the link above to make the jump.

What’s in a Roundel?

This TLCB writer has learned something today; the Royal Australian Navy uses little red kangaroos in place of the red dot more usually found in the centre of the RAF roundel! Kangaroos!

Entering the rabbit hole he has now learned that South Africa’s insignia features an eagle, Trinidad and Tobago a hummingbird, Papua New Guinea the mythical phoenix, and Luxembourg an extravagant lion.

If we ever start a military campaign against The Brothers Brick perhaps we should outline an Elf for the centre of ours?

Following that somewhat tangental start to this post, the aircraft depicted here that features the kangaroo-in-a-circle markings is a Hawker Sea Fury, in this case flown by the Royal Australian Navy.

Based on the Hawker Tempest, the Sea Fury entered service at the end of the second world war and flew until the early ’60s, operating first a pure fighter and then as a fighter-bomber as its suitability for multi-role use became apparent.

This particular Sea Fury is a F.B.11 that operated with Squadron 724 from the H.M.A.S. Albatross, most notably serving in the Korean War, and it’s been recreated beautifully by John C. Lamarck, complete with folding wing-tips, retractable landing gear, an opening cockpit, and – of course – accurate Royal Australian Navy markings including kangaroo roundels.

There’s much more to see of John’s superb Hawker Sea Fury F.B.11 on Flickr – hop on over via the link above!

My Other Other Car’s a Fiat…

The Fiat 500 has been a runaway success across Europe. Over two million have been sold to date, despite the design remaining virtually unchanged in fourteen years of production.

Fiat, unused to building a car that people actually like, subsequently decided that literally everything they make should be a 500[something]. This has unfortunately led to hideous monstrosities like thiswhich have been about as successful as storming the U.S. Capitol building in the hope of overturning a legitimate election.

However unlike Fiat, LEGO’s ace 10271 Creator Fiat 500 set is proving not only a hit, but also one that can be used to create a range of other vehicles that don’t just look like a regular 500 has died at sea and washed up on a beach months later.

Cases in point are these two brilliant B-Models, each built only from the parts found within the 10271 Fiat 500 set, and each managing to successfully create something new and excellent from the recycled parts.

First up (above) is monstermatou‘s marvellous 1920s Citroen 5HP Trefle, which captures the real car so well you’d be hard pushed to know it’s an alternate (which explains why monstermatou very nearly won TLCB Lock-Down B-Model Competition with one of his past builds). Building instructions are available and there’s more to see on Flickr via the link above.

Today’s second 10271 alternate comes from a past official LEGO set designer no less, the incredibly talented Nathanael Kuipers, who has turned the little classic Fiat into a 1950s pick-up truck.

Cleverly using the Fiat’s interior pieces to make up for the shortfall in available bodywork bricks, Nathanael’s B-Model includes opening doors, hood and tailgate, and building instructions are available too.

Click the link above to check out more of Nathanael’s B-Model at his photostream, and if you own a 10271 Creator Fiat 500 set, perhaps see what you can create from it! You’ll easily do a better job than Fiat have managed with the real thing…

#vanlife

Ergh, #vanlife.

Once the preserve of smelly hippies and families who liked to sleep in a field, the humble camper van has transformed into some kind of sustainable-living fashion statement, despite the fact that the occupants are literally burning oil with every unnecessary YouTube video uploaded following their drive to the nearest Starbucks. But if they only eat ethically-sourced all-natural vegan peace-crisps then it’s all OK…

This cheery mini-figure enjoying #vanlife has himself a 6-wide Volkswagen T3 Westfalia camper, complete with a brilliant pop-up roof, sliding door, and a fully fitted interior. Built by PalBenglat of Flickr it could only be more realistic if said mini-figure had a beard and a top-knot.

Join him trying to access the free WiFi at the nearest Starbucks via the link above!

Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA | Picture Special

This is an Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA, and we don’t think we’ve ever wanted a car more.

Built by Zeta Racing, this incredible recreation of Alfa Romeo’s brilliant ’60s sports saloon has jumped right to the top of the list for Best Creation of 2021, with a depth of engineering that is amongst the most advanced that this site has ever featured.

Inside the fantastically well-executed exterior, which captures the Giulia Sprint GTA in Technic form with almost unbelievable realism, is one of the finest Technic Supercar chassis yet built.

Alongside all-wheel suspension and a working 4-cylinder engine, Zeta’s model includes a Power Functions drivetrain that not only delivers remote control drive and steering, but also a motorised sequential gearbox and – amazingly – working brakes with callipers that genuinely squeeze the discs when activated via an on-board pneumatic compressor.

It’s a phenomenal piece of engineering, wrapped in one of the most brilliant Technic bodies we’ve ever seen, which also includes beautifully accurate period-correct decals, and a wonderfully detailed interior too.

There’s much more to see of Zeta’s jaw-dropping Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA at his photostream via the link above, were a wealth of stunning imagery is available to view. Click the link above to join us viewing perhaps the best Technic creation of the last few years.

Intergalactic Escapism

Sometimes this TLCB writer wishes he could be a Classic Spaceman. Permanently happy, the mini-figures of Classic Space don’t have to deal with lockdowns due to deadly disease, Keeping up with the Kardashians, and – in newly depressing events – the greatest undermining of democracy in American history.

It turns out, to the surprise of absolutely no-one, that if you drip feed lie after lie to people in order to inflate your own ego, said people will eventually believe your falsehoods with such fanatical fervour that they will rise up in an attempt to realise the fantasy.

Still, it’s not like America has exported democracy (both successfully and with disastrous consequences) to multiple countries around the world, who are now looking upon the same terrifying images as this writer…

Donald Trump’s new low, and the actions of those undermining the very country they purport to stand for, is of no consequence to the Classic Spaceman however, who continues his business with a smile upon his face and and giant 10×10 ‘Space Utility Truck’ in his control.

This enormous (and marvellous) creation comes from previous bloggee The G Brix, who has unwittingly been brought into this writer’s rant about the worst moment in U.S. electoral history, and it’s packed with ace play functions.

Featuring a working crane, functioning steering, a detailed cockpit, control room, and living space for longer missions, G Brix’s build looks the perfect place to escape the appalling mess the world seems to be in at the moment. Join this writer and host of happy mini-figures in Classic Space via the link above, where there’s no Coronavirus, no Kardashians, and no Donald Trump.

Pottinger Ploughs

This is a Claas Arion 650 with Pottinger Ploughs. We have no idea what a Pottinger Plough is, but it sounds like either a British sandwich or something you might find in the karma sutra. Whatever it is, it looks great here, as built by previous bloggee Keko007, and there’s more to see at his ‘Claas Arion 650 with Pottinger Plows’ album.

Circuit of Speed Champions | Picture Special

We’ve all dreamed of building our own racing circuit from LEGO bricks, with tyre barriers, grandstands, food stands, a pit lane, maybe even a Dunlop bridge…

Well SpaceMan Nathan has actually gone and done it, taking fourteen official LEGO Speed Champions sets and creating this wonderful race track diorama, complete with of all the above and more!

Measuring 144 by 112 studs, Nathan’s Circuit of Speed Champions includes everything a race track should, with a crowd of cheering race fans present to watch to the on-track battle.

There’s loads more to see of Nathan’s beautifully presented circuit diorama at his photostream on Flickr – join the action trackside via the link above!

BrickNerd’s Back!

Good news for the online Lego community! BrickNerd, one of the Lego sites that used to do this whole blogging thing properly (unlike this smoking hole in the ground) is back, and under new management!

After spending several months as silent as Donald Trump’s conscience, a band of illustrious fans of Lego have resuscitated the dead website. We think BrickNerd’s return is good for the whole Lego community, and particularly for the team here at TLCB as it enables us to take the piss out of them constantly again for their almost fanatical devotion to a certain sci-fi movie franchise.

Here at TLCB we wish BrickNerd’s new management the best of luck, which – coming from this shower of ineptitude – means absolutely nothing. Go and and check them out via the link above, and then come back here for more pointless bickering, incompetent writing, and occasional political slurs.

Now if only someone could do the same with MOCpages

Tipping Tatra

Something remarkable appeared to be occurring today. Following the Elves’ peaceful trundle around the office in the back of an RC flatbed truck a few days ago, one of their number returned with this – Martin Nespor‘s excellent remote control Tatra Phoenix 8×4 truck.

Like the aforementioned flatbed, Martin’s Tatra is too slow to run down any Elves, and thus the Elf at the controls instead offered rides to its compatriots, in a moment of apparent Elven generosity never witnessed before.

Could this be a turning point for Elf-on-Elf relations? Well, no. You see the Elf at the controls had worked out that Martin’s Tatra not only drove and steered via Power Functions motors, but that the container on the back could be tipped too, and had placed thumb-tacks in the corner of the corridor in preparation. Sigh.

A gaggle of Elves was duly driven to the awaiting push-pins and tipped on top of them, before the Elf at the controls ran off in delight.

We now have an enraged mob of Elves prowling the office looking for revenge, which often means another completely innocent Elf will be selected at random to replace the missing perpetrator. Whilst we consider whether Mr. Airhorn will be brought out for his first Elven clearance of the year, you can check out more of Martin’s Tatra Phoenix 8×4 tipper truck on Flickr – click the link above to take the trip.

Cop Classic

Christmas is over, the decorations are down, and work begins tomorrow. Versteinert‘s previously featured classic station wagon, as driven by Santa himself, has now been repurposed as a police car, and represents this slightly depressing return to normality in Lego form.

Of course ‘return to normality’ is a relative term, as our emergency workers face probably the most difficult January in living memory, thanks to COVID-19’s decision to become even more transmissible. Yay.

So it’s Christmas hats off to our emergency service readers; you are the heroes we need right now, and there’s more to see of Versteinert’s ’50s police car at via the link above.

Flat Share

The Lego Car Blog Elves have been busy since their re-release after the Christmas break, so it was only a matter of time before one of them found a remotely controlled creation. Those you expecting a tale of mass Elven squashings will be disappointed though, as – excellent though this model is – it’s too slow to cause any Elven casualties, much to the annoyance of the Elf that discovered it.

However, now that we have the controls, it can be used to trundle a great multitude of Elves around TLCB Towers, which they’re enjoying very much.

Eurobricks’ damjan97PL (aka damianPLE) is the builder responsible for this rare moment of Elven calm, thanks to his fully RC 50cm long flatbed truck. An L motor provides the drive, a Servo the steering, and an M motor operates the third axle lift system via a clutch.

It’s an excellent build and one that you can create for yourself as building instructions are available, although you probably don’t have any Elves to transport. Head to the Eurobricks discussion forum for all the details.

Mechanical ‘Mog

LEGO’s enormous official 8110 Technic Mercedes-Benz Unimog is a wondrous thing, with an array of motorised functions alongside pneumatics. However, Technic models can be just as engaging even at the smaller, non-motorised end of the scale. Cue TLCB favourite Thirdwigg, who has created this ace Unimog U500 and packed it with functions, despite not a single motor being used in its construction.

Working steering, four wheel drive, suspension, and a four-cylinder engine all feature, as do a front and rear PTO (selectable via a pneumatic switch and turned when the model is pushed along), a front winch, a tilting cab, and a three-way tipping bed, all powered by hand.

There’s more to see of Thirdwigg’s excellent fully mechanical Unimog at his ‘Unimog U500′ album, where a link to a video of the model in action can also be found. Click the link above to take a look!