Tag Archives: skip

Skippy

No, not that usefully nosey kangaroo (which was effectively a two-legged knock-off of Lassie), but this marvellous Scania P220, known to The LEGO Company as a ‘container truck’. Which of course it isn’t, because it’s a ‘skip lorry’.

Said skip lorry comes from Oliver 79 of Euroricks, who has recreated a Scania P220 truck with a skip hoist mounted on the rear. A pair of manually controlled linear actuators raise the mechanism just like the real thing, there’s a working 6-cylinder engine underneath the detailed tilting cab, functioning steering and suspension, plus working stabiliser legs too.

It’s a superb blend of Technic functionality and Model Team detail, finished with a perfectly recreated yellow skip. Well nearly; it is missing an old lady’s bathroom as all skip lorry models seem to be. Despite this omission it’s a stellar build and one that’s definitely worth a closer look. Skip over to Eurobricks via the link above to do just that.

Skip This

Trucks such as this one always seem to have fancy names when LEGO produce them. Not at this blog though, where they are simply known as a ‘skip lorry’, seeing as they’re a lorry with an, er… skip. Said skip is usually full of an old bathroom, ripped out of an old lady’s bungalow when the new owners moved in, and all the junk from the neighbourhood lobbed into it by every house within walking distance whilst it was on the road.

Previous bloggee Damjan97PL/damianPLE’s fully RC Technic skip lorry is so realistic we’re surprised it doesn’t come with an old lady’s bathroom in the skip on the back to be honest, but besides that rather glaring omission he’s nailed it.

An SBrick provides bluetooth control for the motorised drive, four-wheel steering, raising/lowering rear axle (with automatic steering detachment when raised), and the skip loading arm, whilst there’s also a working six-cylinder engine underneath the tilting cabin, manually operated stabiliser legs and functioning suspension too.

There’s more of Damain’s remote control skip lorry to see at both the Eurobricks forum and at his Bricksafe gallery – click the links to chuck your rubbish on top of an old lady’s bathroom.

Three-Way

This is a Hako Multicar, a common sight on European city streets, and with a fairly rubbish name until you realise how literal it is. The only surviving nameplate from the East German IFA, Multicar have been building small versatile platforms for over eighty years, with everything from floor buffers to armoured military vehicles emerging from their German factory.

However, even a single Multicar model can be multiple, er… cars, as proven here by this superb Technic Multicar 4×4 built by Sthrom (aka Blaz62). Like Multicar’s real vehicles, Sthrom’s creation is capable of switching between several purposes, with a single chassis and cab able to be equipped with multiple attachments.

Sthrom’s Multicar chassis is filled with proper Technic functionality, including all-wheel-steering, all-wheel-suspension, and all-wheel-drive with locking differentials, hooked up to an in-line 4-cylinder engine underneath the tilting cab. The front of the cab is fitted with a multi-purpose mount, allowing a range of equipment to be attached, whilst at the rear and even broader range of machinery can be added.

Sthrom’s model can be deployed to three different uses, with a mobile crane/cherry picker (often seen deployed for street light repair), a container truck/skip lorry, and a snowplough with grit spreader. Each attachment includes a wealth of realistic functionality, all operating mechanically via hand-operated linear actuators, levers, and bevel gears.

It all adds up to being one of our favourite Technic creations of the year, and there’s loads more to see of the Sthrom’s Hako Multicar, including the chassis and each attachment separately, at Bricksafe, the Eurobricks forum, and via the excellent demonstration video below.

YouTube Video

Iveco for Idle Thumbs

LEGO’s excellent Power Functions motors are found in a pretty much every Technic creation that this site features these days. There’s nothing wrong that of course, they add great play value and the Elves can use creations equipped with them to run one another over.

However we do still like good old-fashioned mechanical functions, and not just because it means we don’t have to clean TLCB Towers of squashed Elves.

This is Thirdwigg‘s Iveco skip truck, a neat mid-size Technic creation packed with working functions, all of which are powered by the human finger. Working steering, a piston engine under the tilting cab, rear stabilising legs, and a linear actuator operated skip hoist are all present, and you can see more on Flickr via the link above.

6×5(Wide) II

Lego Town Skip Lorry

Flickr’s de-marco is becoming a regular here at The Lego Car Blog with his ever-growing garage of superb 5-wide Town vehicles. Here are no less than six of our favourites from his latest batch, all of which are available to view at de-marco’s photostream and many include building instructions too!

Lego Fire Truck and Ice Truck

As well as brilliant 5-wide cars and SUVs de-marco has built some of society’s more unusual vehicles, which are of course the ones we’re featuring here. Yes, we know we’re a bit odd. From a functioning skip lorry (top), to a fire engine (above left), freezer-truck (above right), and airport step truck (below) all de-marco’s builds are wonderfully creative, instantly recognisable and – most importantly – playable miniaturisations of their life-size counterparts.

Lego Town Airport Step Truck

All of de-marco’s builds include a few neat working features and they’re also packed with the related paraphernalia associated with their task, including traffic cones and roadsigns in the rear of the highway maintenance truck (below left) and a hand-truck for delivering water-cooler bottles attached to the water delivery truck (below right). Which as everyone knows is a pointless tool, because water-carrying trucks are always annihilated by passing car chases

There’s more to see of each truck at de-marco’s Flickr photostream by clicking here, where you can also find links to building instructions so you can build these for yourself. Click the link above to take a look!

Skip That – Technic 42024 Alternative

Lego Technic 42024 Alternative

LEGO’s 42024 Technic Container Truck set received a fairly average review from our experts earlier in the year. Plenty of scope for improvement then. One builder to give improving the model a go is TLCB debutant Henry Quarmby, who has repurposed the pieces found within the official set for his excellent truck and trailer combo.

Featuring working steering, a linear-actuator operated load bed, a working crane, plus a tilting cab with opening doors, Henry’s 42024 alternative has play value galore. The trailer doesn’t miss out either, with a folding jockey wheel and an opening cover.

All the photos of Henry’s 42024 ‘C-Model’ can be found on MOCpages, plus you can read the aforementioned review of the original Technic Container Truck (or Skip Lorry as decreed by our reviewer) set by clicking on the link above. Which model do you prefer?

Lego 42024 C-Model

Skippy

Lego Skip Lorry

This neat looking ERF skip lorry, or ‘container truck’ if you’re from The LEGO Group, was discovered on Flickr. Built by Makorol it features full remote control drive and a host of other working functions. You can check out all the photos via Flickr here, watch Makorol explain all in his excellent video below, and you can read our review of LEGO’s own 42024 container tr… sorry skip lorry set by clicking here.

Lego Container Truck

Red Lorry, Yellow Lorry

And they’re the same lorry…

Lego Technic 42024

This is Technic set 42024, ‘Container Truck’ which will henceforth be referred to as a ‘Skip Lorry’ since I write this in the UK and that’s what it is. It’s a mid-market set that sits in the not-too-extravagant £60 sweet spot, so let’s see what it offers…

Firstly, Technic boxes these days look pretty good; a clear image of what’s inside and simple, elegant graphics. Shame you have to rip it to get into it. Now to empty the (un-numbered) bags into my customary unsortable heap and get building…. you may wonder at this point if a rainbow has vomited on your work surface…. Time will tell if all those colours work well (8860) or not (8865)…

It’s a fairly standard build that starts with a gearbox. This seems like an unnecessary complication, since it’s only switching between two functions and there’ll still be two controls, but there is a perfectly good reason for this. Be patient. There’s nothing too difficult here and the two instruction books give you completely clear guidance. What is refreshing is that it seems like there’s a few more pieces per build step than in many recent kits – a possible reflection of it’s intended age group (10-43 since you ask…)

After a leisurely hour or two you’ll have a skip lorry that looks quite nice, and your earlier fears over it’s colour co-ordination will prove unfounded. This is an attractive model. Although the feature count is quite modest, and nowhere near the let’s-stuff-everything-in 42008, what it does, it does well.

Even the stabilizers do a good job… they are linked to a connector that engages with a bar on the skip when left up. This enables it to tip the container, which is something I’ve never seen a skip lorry do; perhaps I’m just not paying attention. It’s an effective, well thought out system.

With the stabilizers down, two linear actuators move the skip in a graceful arc onto the surface behind, accompanied by much furious wheel twirling. As standard, this is a manual control model but said manual control is the usual black gear, when an old fashioned pulley and pin would be more ergonomic given the lowish gearing here.

Or better still, stuff a motor in. It’ll take a PF M motor and battery box with the greatest of ease – so much so I suspect that it was intended to be motorized all along (hence the gearbox). The only reason it’s not being that it didn’t hit it’s price point so equipped. Allegedly. This would be a much better set at £80 with the motor included, but I can see why Lego wouldn’t want it troubling 42008’s market position.

Now let’s talk about styling…

Lego Technic 42024 and 42008

It does look good, and I think the colours help here, although it might be time for Lego to make a bit more effort in the cab area. There’s nothing bad here, but it’s a bit same-again. Detailing is a tad sketchy and ill-thought-out (if the doors had glass, the mirrors would go through it when they open, for instance). Presumably, it couldn’t be seen to out-shine the more expensive 42008. I prefer the grille treatment on 42024, though – those silvered grille tiles always look a little flat. Maybe I’m just pining for the 8292 Cherry Picker from a few years ago – an otherwise unremarkable set with a very attractive cab design. Or you can simply treat it as a blank canvas to put your own ideas on – it’s Lego after all!

One piece (or rather six pieces) of very good news is the tyres – new for this set (and the digger in 42023), they’re proper square-shouldered, not-too-wide truck *ahem* lorry tyres that greatly enhance this model compared to the smaller, wider items on 42008.

They enhance the B-model too – another grader! It looks pretty good though – at least as good as the 57,000 grader B-models that have preceded it… one of these days there’ll be a grader A model but I won’t hold my breath. You have to go online to build it, however, and that’s always a faff….

So, what have we learned? 42024 is quite stylish, in its multi-coloured, unadorned way, and it works quite well (if you add a proper handwheel) or very well if you put a motor in. 8/10 – if you’ve already got a motor. 6/10 if you haven’t.

I’ve just realized that I’ve done an entire Technic vehicle review without moaning about the steering. This lorry has a good system. It really does.

To see all the official LEGO sets reviewed by The Lego Car Blog, including 42008, visit the LEGO Set Review Library here.