Tag Archives: Town

Enter Sandman*

We’re not really sure what’s going on here but we expect the cement mixer truck won’t be the same shape by the end. Built by hachiroku24, there’s more to see of ‘Spiderman vs. Sandman’ via the link, where building instructions can also be found!

*Today’s awesome title song.

Holidays Are Com… Wait, What?

It’s the time of year when our TVs are filled with a brightly-lit truck, travelling slowly through American towns distributing soft drinks to happy citizens, and it makes everyone feel a bit more magical.

This is not that truck.

Flickr’s Keko007 has chosen to mark the start of the festive season by resolutely not building the famous Coca Cola Christmas truck, instead building an unadorned trailer for Coke’s rival, pulled by the blandest and most generic European truck that there is, the DAF XF.

Which is not magical at all.

It is a great build though, with one of the best brick-built logos we’ve seen in ages, and there’s more of Keko’s excellent Not-The-Coca-Cola-Christmas-Truck to see at the link above.

Salt Shaker

At this time of year TLCB Team regularly drive on salt. Monotonous November roads and yet more rust eating the office’s Rover 200 are probably not what you had in mind though. Fortunately Flickr’s Faber’s Flickr’s Faber Mandragore has created a far more interesting salty journey, recreating the Utaharian landscape of the world famous Bonneville Salt Flats and a mini-figure scale salt-flat hot rod in which to tackle them. It definitely beats a grimy motorway in November, so we’ll be at Faber’s photostream imagining we’re in Utah. Join us there via the link.

To Walmart!

It’s Black Friday! Which means the entire office are off to Walmart to fight middle aged women for discounted electricals. Not really, we’re very much remaining here and very much buying nothing, because a) we’re in another COVID-19 lockdown, and b) most importantly, Black Friday can suck it.

Still, if you must venture out to storm your local Walmart, have we got the vehicle for you! This is Ivan Martynov‘s ‘PanzerVVagen Heavy Terrestrial Assault Vehicle’, and it’s the perfect transport for the annual shopocalypse. Martin’s even racked up some old lady kills which are displayed proudly on the side.

Take the PanzerVVagen to Walmart and add your own old lady stamp (Carol from across the street isn’t going to get that last half-price TV alive!) via the link above!

Little Red Wagon

It’s a busy day here at TLCB, with several Elves vying for a meal token. The first lucky recipient returned to TLCB Towers with this, Tim Henderson‘s ‘Little Red Wagon’ mid-engined wheel-standing dragster. There’s not much room for stuff in the bed, and even if there was it would probably tip out anyway, but who cares when you can wheelie on the way to work. Head to Flickr via the link above for more!

Going Cottaging

This is a walking cottage, designed to survive the spider apocalypse. Because of course it is. Letranger Absurde owns the mind behind it and there’s more to see at his photostream on Flickr. Click here to go cottaging. Sorry, we mean here. We’re nothing if not educational!

Yellow Off-Road**

You really don’t need a billion bricks and a friend at The Brothers Brick to be blogged*. It does help if some of your bricks are yellow though…

This is de-marco‘s 4-wide ‘Yellow Off-Roader’, it’s excellent, there are building instructions available, and there’s more to see at the link.

*Unless you want to be blogged by The Brothers Brick of course.

**Another excuse for us to link to this. Sorry, we’ve had a lot of sugar today.

Banned from McDonald’s

A burn-out in the car park is as sure a way to get banned from your local McDonald’s as bringing TLCB Elves in for a Happy Meal. Not that that’s ever happened. Moving on, the mini-figure at the wheel of Faber Madragore‘s ‘Drag Rod’ is about to strike another fast food outlet off the list, spinning the tyres in a brick-built cloud of smoke that’s only surpassed – oddly – by the brilliance of the brick-built car park. Join Faber in the McDonald’s parking lot via the link above!

Flying Food

In Ninjago City and need some food on the go? Then fly on over to Parvel Artemov’s floating food stand! Visit Eurobricks or Flickr to place your order.

From Land to Landfill

The Earth is undergoing a considerable change. Of course it has always changed, thanks to a variable climate and the evolution borne from it, however until recently it’s been in a period of beautiful stability that lasted tens of thousands of years. And then mankind started chopping everything down, digging everything up, and burning it…

The result is a climate changing at a rate that is way beyond the pace that life can adapt to survive, and once the permafrost melts and releases the methane trapped within it, we’re on a one-way train to doomsville.

It’s not too late though, as nature has a remarkable ability to heal itself if given the chance. One way we can limit the damage is to consume less, whether that’s energy, material things, or food. Food production, particularly meat, is the single largest contributor to the destruction of our wilderness. Buying local, and not eating the meat from intensively-farmed, chemical-filled, miserable animals, is both better for us and the planet upon which we live.

Cue Chris Elliott‘s Japanese mobile greengrocer, bringing locally grown produce to your door in a converted minibus. Chris’s beautifully detailed creation includes a range of brick-built veg, breads and pastries, a burst of pink flowers down the side, and even LED lighting. Plus there’s not a battery-farmed chicken in sight.

Reducing consumption doesn’t necessarily mean buying less, as at present an average of 219lbs of food is wasted annually by every American, equating to over a third of all U.S. food production.

Throwing less away, and recycling it when we do (even food), means less chopping down, less digging up, and less burning. Cue Jonathan Elliott‘s excellent Dennis Eagle garbage truck/bin lorry, which is where what we discard usually ends up. Jonathan’s bin lorry captures the real thing superbly, and there’s even a working lift mechanism at the back.

Sadly it only has black and grey bins, but change them for green and blue (or whatever the recycling colours are where you live), and we might just avert the looming catastrophe yet. Click the links above to follow the food from land to landfill, and ask yourself if there’s a better way…

Hungry Passenger

1saac W.’s brilliant 6-wide Jeep Wrangler first appeared here last week, but if you’re going to build a Jeep Wrangler, there’s only one we’re really interested in…

With a quick update to turn the model to an earlier ‘YJ’ series and the addition of some red stripes, 1saac can now imagine an overweight nerd being eaten alive by a juvenile Dilophosaurus in the passenger set.

Join the fun on Flickr via the link!

Cream Wrangler

Today’s title might sound like some sort of dairy-based burglar, but we’re actually referring to this most excellent 6-wide Jeep Wrangler TJ by regular bloggee 1saac W, which comes coloured in an unusual cream and light brown combo.

Cunning parts usage including mini-figure hands for mirror brackets, half of a Lego lever for wiper arms, and a whole lot of sideways clear 1×2 plates make this one of the most realistic small scale Wranglers we’ve seen, and there’s more to see of 1saac’s cream 4×4 on Flickr via the link.

Competition Coupe

Inspired by a drag racing shop local to him, Tim Henderson has recreated this vintage dragster that competed in the ‘Competition Coupe’ class. It’s inspired by the real dragster Lil’ Honker and there’s more to see on Flickr via the link.

Silver Snail

Small cars are different depending on where you live. Today’s other small car, a revolution in gas-guzzling America, had an engine more than three times the size of France’s equivalent.

France was in a rather different place after the Second World War though. Well, it was in the same place as it is now, but economically and infrastructurally it couldn’t have been more different from America, thanks to seeing the worst of the conflict.

The country therefore needed a small, cheap, reliable car that used the minimum of materials and ‘could cross a ploughed field’, or – we suspect more relevantly – a road network blown to bits by years of war.

With a two-cylinder engine around half a litre or less, easy maintenance, and minimal material costs, Citroen produced nearly 4 million 2CVs over a forty year production run, and – effectively – remobilised France.

This brilliant Town-scale replica of the ‘tin snail’ captures the iconic peoples’ car superbly, and it comes form previous bloggee Jonathan Elliott of Flickr. A myriad of curved plates has been deployed to capture a shape that was easy to make in metal, but fiendishly difficult to create in bricks, and bar the inappropriate tyres (get yourself some ’80s Town tyres Jonathan!) the result is about as good as it’s possible to get at this scale.

There’s more to see of Jonathan’s Citroen 2CV on Flickr, where this build and a host of other brilliant Town vehicles can be found. Click the link above to make the jump.

Metropolitan Revolution

Cities can be wonderfully diverse places, where different cultures, races, and even languages mix together to create a greater whole. The automotive industry is rather similar, although these days certain quarters see this as some kind of evil globalisation, rather than countries making what they’re best at to, again, create a greater whole.

However back in the 1950s sharing production between countries wasn’t really a thing yet, until Nash came along with their design for a new sort of car (in the U.S. at least), railing against ‘bigger is better’ by making something… smaller. Their revolutionary mindset continued to production, which wouldn’t have been profitable in the U.S.

Instead Nash turned to Austin/Rover in England, who were selected to produce the car on behalf of Nash and fitted it with their own B-Series engine. The car became the ‘Metropolitan’ upon it’s return to the U.S where, in yet more revolutionary thinking, it became the first post-war American car marketed specifically to women.

The Nash Metropolitan received mixed reviews from an American motoring press rather unwilling to try anything that wasn’t sixteen feet long, but these proved to be rather different when people bought the Metropolitan and actually used it, whereupon it surpassed expectations.

It wouldn’t be until the oil crisis of the 1970s that America really took small cars seriously though, and marketing to women was probably further behind that even, yet Nash and Austin’s collaboration had proved the concept some two decades earlier.

Fast forward to today and we seem to be in some sort of ‘Tenet’ style inversion, as ’50s style ‘bigger is better’ and ‘not foreign’ are climbing America’s agenda once again. We’ll stick with the little ’50s Nash Metropolitan though, a revolution ahead, and now perhaps behind, the times…

Oh yeah, Lego… This beautiful little 4-wide recreation of the Metropolitan comes from previous bloggee 1saac W., and there’s more to see at his photostream. Click the link to join the revolution.